Samsung HT X30R- lip sync problem

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Buying & Building' started by shane84, Jan 24, 2008.

  1. shane84

    shane84
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    Hello,
    I purchased the Samsung HT X30R and Samsung LE52M86BD 52" HD Ready 1080p digital LCD TV
    I connect my sound system to my tv and when i watch sky HD i get lip sync (very annoying )
    I got to keep switching sound outputs every 10 min,
    Anyways I phoned Samsung and they said it will be my optical output on my TV and a firmware upgrade will fix this, is this true? I heard on this forum its a known problem, if not is there a fix.

    shane
     
  2. kentish_lad

    kentish_lad
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    How is the sky connected to X30r??


    You should have,

    SKY>> hdmi >> TV
    SKY>> OPTICAL >> X30R
    X30R >> hdmi >> TV



    If you are coming from the TV's 'optical out' you will not get 5.1 and lip sync problems
     
  3. Nexsen

    Nexsen
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    I have to comment on this statement:

    "If you are coming from the TV's 'optical out' you will not get 5.1 and lip sync problems." NOT MY STATEMENT BUT COPIED FOR REFERENCE

    I'm not sure what was meant but you will "always have lip-sync error" to some degree unless you tweak an audio delay like the Felston DD740 or Primare Delay Box or Alchemy2 Delay Line until it is perfect and that must be done for every program and every DVD.

    The reason is that lip-sync starts getting off at image capture and tiny lip-sync errors creep in at numerous points throughout post production and broadcast. Since they are cumulative they often add up to more lip-sync error than your display's video delay will add.

    So, even if what was meant by that statement was that the s/pdif audio on the optical output is delayed by the TV's fixed video delay to keep it from contributing to lip-sync error - you will still see whatever lip-sync error was in the arriving signals.

    In my case my arriving signals range from audio already delayed by 39 ms to audio ahead of video by 71 ms. That doesn't count my display's video delay of 60 ms.

    I apply delays from my Felston DD740 ranging from 21 ms (the 39 ms delayed audio case) to 131 ms (the 71 ms leading audio case) and achieve perfect lip-sync on every program but if I left it set at 60 ms to only offset my display's video delay the lip-sync error would still be intolerable and would definitely have the negative impact on viewer perception documented statistically by research at Stanford University..

    There are no watermarks in the video and audio signals to define when they were ever in-sync so "automatic lip-sync correction" is impossible". That HDMI 1.3 claim simply means the TV will tell the receiver what "fixed" video delay it will cause. It definitely can not correct lip-sync that varies from program to program or DVD to DVD.

    Consider my case: An HDMI 1.3 TV would tell an HDMI 1.3 receiver to add 60 ms of audio delay so I would see the incoming 39 ms delayed audio whereas with no correction at all I would only have seen 21 ms of lip-sync error so it that case it actually causes a larger lip-sync error than would have existed if left uncorrected.

    Instead I get perfect lip-sync for that case by setting my DD740 at 21 ms and my display's 60 ms video delay offsets the 39 ms already delayed audio leaving only 21 ms of video delay to be cancelled by the DD740's 21 ms audio delay.

    That subjective fine-tuning of an audio delay while watching the program you are correcting is the ONLY way to eliminate lip-sync error completely.

    Unfortunately I've never seen an a/v receiver that would allow tweaking the audio delay while watching without disrupting the image and that is an essential feature for lip-sync correction which the Felston DD 740 and Primare Delay Box as well as the Alchemy2 delay lines all have. All these dedicated lip-sync correction units also offer over 600 ms delay which overcomes another deficiency of a/v receivers in this area as some have as little as 68 ms delay and few offer over 200 ms.

    While 200 ms is usually enough for regular TV it will fall to 100 ms for 96 KHz audio and that is often too little to correct HDTV's larger lip-sync errors.

    My DD740 has 680 ms at 48 KHz but will still be 340 ms at 96 KHz which is more than enough delay even for HDTV.
     

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