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SAGEM AXIUM HD-D45 – to buy or not to buy ?

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by J80FAB, Jun 27, 2005.

  1. J80FAB

    J80FAB
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    I’ve been reading the postings in the forum for a couple of weeks now & am still undecided if to go ahead with buying this DLP, and if so where I should buy it.

    I paid a visit to Comet today to see what sort of prices they would give if you bought the HD-D45 together with an extended warranty & stand for example.

    The guy just basically said that the set is £1799, extended 5 year warranty £270, delivery £15.95 and that the Kenmark stand they have for £199 would be half-price if bought with the Sagem. I mentioned John Lewis selling the set for £1995 with 5 year warranty & delivery & he just said that they weren’t able to ‘price match’. :thumbsdow

    One thing that struck me when I saw the Kenmark stand Comet sell for £199 is that the same stand appears in the Index catalogue for £99.99 !!! :eek: An extra £100 for what exactly ??? :lesson: Obviously some sort of pricing strategy to make people buy a stand because they think they are saving money. :lesson: If someone wants one of these stands I guess it’s worth checking to see if Index still have any in stock as they may be selling them dirt cheap now to get shot of them. :thumbsup:

    Anyway basically the Comet price comes to £90 more than John Lewis, but then apparently Comet cover the lamp for the whole 5 years (see my other posting). And if the set cannot be repaired during the 5 years then they give you vouchers to the full amount for which the set was purchased. :D

    Aside from the above I would also appreciate any comments about viewing 4:3 transmissions on the Sagem. The set would also be used to watch satellite transmissions (not Sky Digital) which do not seem to have a 16:9 transmission element to them. Does the Sagem’s ‘enlargement’ format suitably enlarge the picture without distortion ?

    One more thing. I played about with the picture format of the HD feed they had in Comet. Reviews I’ve read about the Sagem so far state that geometry is spot on. However, the vertices of the picture to the left & right of the black bars on the screen in 4:3 mode were not straight at all & slightly concave ! I’ve also seen some slanting of the upper black bar on some other demonstrator models.
     
  2. sprattgraham

    sprattgraham
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    Why would you want to watch HD in 4:3 Mode, checked it on mine and I have the same problem

    When you talk about "slanting of the upper black bar" do you mean when something is being watch is wide screen? If so I don't have that problem.

    I've watched some 4:3 satellite through my PC and I set the mode on the TV to Stretch and that worked fine.
     
  3. Caimbeul

    Caimbeul
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    John Lewis in Bluewater have it for £1799 (all there large screen have the 5yr warranty but doesnt cover bulb)
     
  4. J80FAB

    J80FAB
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    Slight misunderstanding. I was checking to see what the picture looked like in the modes provided by the Sagem & noticed how the geometry had been set on that particular set in 4:3 mode. This is not a 'problem' as such.

    The slanting was visible when the transmission was in a 'letterbox' with black bar top & bottom. The geometry must have been set in such a way that the upper bar was slanting. Don't tell me that you've never ever noticed this on some CRT sets ! Next time in Currys compare & contrast :D

    Though I'm not sure if plasmas or LCDs are susceptible to displaying the above mentioned as I've never ever seen slanting, etc on a plasma or LCD tv screen. :confused:

    Yeah, but I mentioned the picture modes on the Sagem & you've commented about your PC screen..... !
     
  5. J80FAB

    J80FAB
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    Interesting, I wonder if JL's instore-price has been reduced while on-line it is still £1995.

    For the £1799 do they still include the 5 year extended warranty & delivery ?
     
  6. LV426

    LV426
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    I have seen examples of bad geometry on DLP RPs. And I don't know why they should suffer this. It must be bad optical alignment (quite unlike CRTs with the same problem) or poor lenses, even. I doubt it is (or, rather should be) an electronic adjustment.
     
  7. J80FAB

    J80FAB
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    I just always assumed that it must be down to an electronic adjustment. :confused:

    One of our previous CRT tv sets was a Finlux & it suffered from dry joints on one occasion & the picture went. The guy who fixed it did not check the geometry of the picture after the repair. When he brought the tv back & turned it on the picture was egg-shaped vertically !!! Consequently he had to take it back & call Finlux. :rolleyes:

    I also remember that the same guy repaired the Finlux on a previous occasion & managed to stand on the curtains in the sitting room pulling them down together with the whole curtain rail.... life is always complicated ! :rolleyes: :laugh:

    Though I guess that the adjustment to put the picture right in the above case is an electronic one where the horizontal & vertical values are adjusted, a bit like the option on CRT computer monitors I think.

    As you say 'slanty' pictures may be down to something else (on both RPs & CRTs), though it doesn't look very impressive if they are present on very expensive sets on display at your local electrical store..... oh well.

    Out of interest I did read once somewhere something about magnetic fields affecting the orientation of a tv picture in CRT televisions & that some tv sets (I've never seen any !) have options in their settings to adjust & compensate for this..... beats me !
     
  8. sprattgraham

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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sprattgraham
    I've watched some 4:3 satellite through my PC and I set the mode on the TV to Stretch and that worked fine.


    I have my HTPC Connected to the Sagem too watch HD & SD Satellite
     
  9. LV426

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    At the risk of straying too far off-topic:

    The image on a direct view CRT is produced by firing three streams of electrons from three points at the back of the tube towards the front. If they weren't deflected, they'd all land at a single point in the centre of the tube face. So, as they go, the streams are deflected by electromagnets around the tube neck and hence scan across the face of the tube. The shape of the picture is wholly determined by the behaviour of these electromagnets which in turn is controlled by electronics. So, on a CRT, any geometry issues are wholly electronic in nature.

    On a panel projector (LCD or DLP or D-iLA (etc), front or rear) the image is produced on one or three small image chips (LCD or DMD) and at this point is - must be - correctly shaped. The chip is illuminated and the projected image produced wholly optically, in much the same way as a slide projector does.

    Hence, properly designed optics must necessarily produce a properly shaped image. Whilst I've no doubt that optical flaws could be corrected electronically (by using only part of the chip to produce a pre-distorted image; keystone adjustment on front projectors is an example) this should not be the case especially in a self-contained unit.
     

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