Running Multiple Ethernet Cables outside of house

Grove55

Novice Member
Our router is currently in the lounge at the middle of the house and our walls seem to be made of lead as wifi is near non-existent in the rest of the house. I've persevered for some time with wifi extenders but these are pretty unreliable so am finally looking to hard wire 3 rooms of the house via ethernet cables. I'd ideally like to be able to take 3 cables from the router in the lounge, take these outside the house and around to our front room, office and kitchen. I plan to install wall sockets in each of the 3 rooms and then use switches to connect to our devices (Or may add a router bridge in each room). In order to get all 3 cables external, are there any alternatives other than simply feeding all 3 directly through the wall and out (as this won't look the tidiest). I'd originally considered adding a wall socket in the lounge to take the cables out however i understand that the socket can only have 1 output, so i'd need 3 individual sockets next to the router? I'm very new to this kind of setup so please go easy on me. Any ideas/advice would be appreciated.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
"RJ45" type faceplates/sockets are available in 1, 2, 3 or 4 port densities in a standard 85mm backbox, (though 1 or 2 is most common) and basically double that in a "double size" backbox.

I've never done it myself, but the resident sparkies at one place I worked would run cables through attic spaces and drop them down cavity walls and "fish" the cables through new holes chased out the walls. I guess much depends on the structure of your premises and what/where you can access.

Some of the profession cabling guys that contribute here will doubtless have some other ideas.
 

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
You can use external grade cat 5, but I have had 20m of cheap and cheerful basic install grade tacked along the north wall of my house for 15 years now without issue.

I would agree that an access point in each room, possibly coupled with a switch if more parts are required should work.

Brush plates are another option to face plates and reduce the number of connections, which can improve speed and error correction / packet drops.
 

chukwe

Well-known Member
Have you tried using homeplugs? I'm in the same situation as you. Homeplugs have been my saviour.
 

Grove55

Novice Member
Thanks for the additional tips. In terms of the RJ45 sockets with multiple plugs, do these require multiple inputs or does the socket "Split" a single input (i.e. does each individual plug on the socket have it's own ethernet cable connected "behind" the socket). Trying to determine if i can have 3 patch cables from the router to a triple socket, which then feeds out the back of the socket externally to 3 separate rooms in the house via 3 ethernet cables?

Thanks for the tip on the homeplug/powerline extenders, i've tried these previously but our house is pretty old and we have (at least) 3 separate circuit mains through the house)
 

chukwe

Well-known Member
This is the one I'm currently using Amazon product
If it doesn't work nor pair, you can return it back to Amazon.

My house is old but as long as the wiring system is fine, I don't see any issues.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
Thanks for the additional tips. In terms of the RJ45 sockets with multiple plugs, do these require multiple inputs or does the socket "Split" a single input (i.e. does each individual plug on the socket have it's own ethernet cable connected "behind" the socket). Trying to determine if i can have 3 patch cables from the router to a triple socket, which then feeds out the back of the socket externally to 3 separate rooms in the house via 3 ethernet cables?

Thanks for the tip on the homeplug/powerline extenders, i've tried these previously but our house is pretty old and we have (at least) 3 separate circuit mains through the house)

For ethernet usage, each cable lobe can only have one active "thing" at either end, so the cable cannot be "split" ever. (You can for UK analogue phones, but that's a different story.)

So it's as you say - 3 patch cables from router LAN ports to each port on the front of the faceplate/socket, each port on the socket has it's own distinct set of IDC "punch down" blocks on the back, thence 3 cable runs from the back side to whatever is next down the line. They are not (and must not be) in any way electrically "spliced" or inter-connected.

I've never used a 3-way (though I've had plenty "done for me" by my subbies) but I can't help thinking a triple socket in a standard 85mm form might be a bit "tight" for space round the back, so I'd want to take a look at picture to ensure I could get in there with a standard IDC "punch down" tool and didn't need anything special, but one of the bona-fida cabling guy in these parts will doubtless idiot check me on that.

If not and you have space for a "double socket" back box, you could easily make a 3 port version from a "modular" faceplate socket range (whereby you make up whatever you want from a mix of snap in sockets and blanking plates) or buy a four way a just not wire up one of the ports.

There's a few ways to skin this particular cat.
 

spile

Active Member
I run cat5e cable in plastic trunking outside the house. Invest in a decent crimping tool and some metal feed-through plugs.
Homplugs may also be a suitable option for you.
I can also recommend repurposing an old router as a wireless access point.
 

Grove55

Novice Member
Thanks for all the assistance/guidance all - i'll hopefully get this up and running sometime in the next fortnight. Thanks!
 

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