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Question Running Cat 6a in existing plasterboard wall cable runs

sfulleruk

Novice Member
Hi,

A bit if a novice question.

I want to run two ethernet cables from the living room to the main bedroom.

I live in a newish build (10 years old) ground floor flat with plasterboard walls.

I would like to run two cat6a cables between the living room to the main bedroom where there is a single plasterboard wall separating the rooms.

in the living room, there is a faceplate with two blank covers and adapter plates for sat tv, tv and radio.

the bedroom has a faceplate with just 2 two connections.

Would it be possible to remove the faceplates and run the Ethernet cables using rods to each face plates and changing the face plate to accommodate the new cables?
 
D

Deleted member 24354

Guest
Maybe is the answer. It depends if the two faceplates are back to back or offset. Back to back should be fine, offset there maybe a wooden stud in between locations. This being the case you will need to either notch or drill the stud to get the cable through or around it.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
Yes, we do i all the time. The faceplates, including "modular" systems, are usually design to fit into standard 85mm patresses (or double sockets as appropriate) the same as used for light switches, mains plugs, tv sockets. etc. The only real "gotcha" to watch out for is the depth. Things like TV sockets may not have back boxes deep enough to accommodate IDC punch down blocks. Worse case, you could perhaps install some surface mount back boxes if space and aesthetics permit.

Strictly speaking, to actually "be" cat6a, you should be installing into proper containment, but that doesn't mean it won't work for ethernet usage unless you do a spectacularly bad job of installing it - poor termination is the biggest culprit.
 

sfulleruk

Novice Member
Maybe is the answer. It depends if the two faceplates are back to back or offset. Back to back should be fine, offset there maybe a wooden stud in between locations. This being the case you will need to either notch or drill the stud to get the cable through or around it.

Hi, the faceplates are offset and about 2-3m between them
 

sfulleruk

Novice Member
Yes, we do i all the time. The faceplates, including "modular" systems, are usually design to fit into standard 85mm patresses (or double sockets as appropriate) the same as used for light switches, mains plugs, tv sockets. etc. The only real "gotcha" to watch out for is the depth. Things like TV sockets may not have back boxes deep enough to accommodate IDC punch down blocks. Worse case, you could perhaps install some surface mount back boxes if space and aesthetics permit.

Strictly speaking, to actually "be" cat6a, you should be installing into proper containment, but that doesn't mean it won't work for ethernet usage unless you do a spectacularly bad job of installing it - poor termination is the biggest culprit.
Hi,

Thankyou so buying arod should do the trick for n my case?

when you say containment do you mean it’s isolated from other cabling? I am hoping to run faster than gigabit speeds but if that’s all I can guarantee it would be better than now
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
Mostly I'm making the point that to actually be cat whatever, there's more to it that just buying the appropriate cabling and connectors, (though of course, that is a factor) for the higher cats. There are lots of installation stipulations that become more stringent as the cats get higher and it needs to be "certified" with some very expensive equipment that subjects it to a battery of tests (you get lots of pretty graphs out of it,) however such equipment is well beyond the means of your typical DIY, (it costs thousands.)

So, don't think you've actually got a cat6a install just because you bought cat6a cable. You may have, but it's not guaranteed. You might find it's fine for gigabit ethernet, but at some future date, may fall down when you try to put (say) 40Gig ethernet down it and leave you scratching you head thinking "why's it not working - I bought cat6a cable. all those years ago..?"

The "containment" means "proper" conduits, trackways, trays and so forth. Earlier cat versions were much less specific about such things (if they specified it at all) so in all the worlds offices etc. you'll find lots of cat5/5e strung up in ceiling voids, under suspended floors and clipped/lashed to anything that was "handy."

For cat6 and upwards their installation stipulations get more prescriptive. For example, there are "rules" about maximum number of cables in a bundle, recommendations to "cross" them every so often, use only loosely tied "velcro" cable ties (instead of plastic zip-locks,) "rules" that cable should be "layed" in and not "pulled" in. So poking a cable down a wall and "fishing" (as my sparkies call it) for it through the back boxes with coat hanger and pulling though possibly instantly "fails" cat6a certification simply because of the way it was installed. But that doesn't mean it won't work for gigabit ethernet which is well within the performance headroom of even cat5e.

Personally, (in my day job when I had one) if I needed better than gigabit performance, I'd be using fiber optic for speed and mechanisms like Link Aggregation (binding multiple physical links into a single logical link) for bandwidth and not trying to make single runs of copper cable go ever faster. But of course, I'm spending other peoples money doing so in buiding "designed for" data networking (have the risers and so forth in situ.) Even then, in some instances there's no other option but to try and get more out of copper.

Given how much incumbent cat5e UTP there is in all the worlds office blocks, there's a big incentive to find ways to deliver faster speeds over what already exists rather than require users to rip and replace it all. Over the next few years, my money's on "half" and "quarter" clocked 10Gig (yielding 5Gig and 2.5Gig respectively) over cat5/5e for those "desktop" drops that are too long (or crap) to support 10Gig. It's going to be interesting to see how it plays out.
 
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