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Running Cat 5e/6 on outer wall of house - do I need special cable?

FlexiPack

Standard Member
I've been trying to figure out the best way to get a reliable and fast network connection from downstairs (router location) to upstairs (future HTPC). I've considered Homeplugs but discounted because of expense and the fact we have old wiring so I doubt i'd get decent speeds. MoCa might be an option but I would still need to lay some cable for that and the boxes are expensive. Wireless is out as I want to stream HD content.

So it's Cat5e/6. I can't route it through the house so my only option is to route it outside of the house.

Are there any special considerations I should take note of when doing this? I've read you can get UV sheilded cable for outdoor use but I've also read this isn't likely to be necessary for home installations. I live in the north of england so it does get pretty cold but it will be out of direct rain (apart from when it comes down sideways!). I'm trying to keep the costs down so I don't want to be buying specialist cable unless necessary.

Can the cable be run alongside satellite and regular coax cables? Any intereference issues there?

I was initially going to go with Cat 6 because it is higher graded for not much more money but I read that you have to be careful when bending it whereas Cat 5e isn't quite so finicky, is that right? Reason I ask is that after running the cable along the wall I will need to bend it at a fairly sharp angle in order to get it in through the wall. Does Cat 5e have any issues with bending?

Thanks!
 

Deadringers

Distinguished Member
personally if it was me and i had cat 6 i would just use that. network cable is quite robust really never had a cable fail on me and im playing with routers and switches all day at uni :)

as for shielded or not...again never had any prolems even when the network cables are running next to powercables for computers etc.

see what others say but i think cat 6 would be fine.

Josh
 

Michael

Prominent Member
They're not nearly as expensive as they used to be...
And less unsightly than running a patch cable down the wall.

85Mb/s : Extra Value 85Mbps Powerline Adapter - Twin Pack
200Mb/s: Extra Value 200Mbps Powerline Adapter - Twin Pack

The age of the wireing is usually not a problem: I'm on ring-mains and my 85mbps ones stream at 75+Mb/s from teh other side of the house.
HD can only be < 100 mbps anyways, so a 200Mbps should cover you (well, unless you feel the urge to superbit HD :D)

As for using cat5/6 outside: As long as there are no joins/gaps in the outside length, you should have no problems. Use a good brand, and it'l be fine.

Interferance shouldn't be a problem with a digital signal, but you never can tell with bees...
 

FlexiPack

Standard Member
personally if it was me and i had cat 6 i would just use that. network cable is quite robust really never had a cable fail on me and im playing with routers and switches all day at uni :)

as for shielded or not...again never had any prolems even when the network cables are running next to powercables for computers etc.

see what others say but i think cat 6 would be fine.

Josh

I think if I go down the Cat6 route I'll give regular cable a try first. UV shielded is a fair bit more expensive I believe.

Thanks Josh, and for the welcome too :thumbsup:


They're not nearly as expensive as they used to be...
And less unsightly than running a patch cable down the wall.

85Mb/s : Extra Value 85Mbps Powerline Adapter - Twin Pack
200Mb/s: Extra Value 200Mbps Powerline Adapter - Twin Pack

The age of the wireing is usually not a problem: I'm on ring-mains and my 85mbps ones stream at 75+Mb/s from teh other side of the house.
HD can only be < 100 mbps anyways, so a 200Mbps should cover you (well, unless you feel the urge to superbit HD :D)

As for using cat5/6 outside: As long as there are no joins/gaps in the outside length, you should have no problems. Use a good brand, and it'l be fine.

Interferance shouldn't be a problem with a digital signal, but you never can tell with bees...

They're not a bad price are they! Get good reviews too. Though one reviewer said he only got 4mbs in his 40 year old wiring. I've read reports like this before. It does seem very hit and miss. I wonder what sort of returns policy Ebuyer has on them. I presume the 7 day DSR would apply?

It's an awkward one because the units may not be fault but if someone can't get speeds quick enough for their desire purpose then they'd be no use to them. If I could return them no quibbles then I'd give these a go first. A lot less hassle than the cat 6 cabling.

Cheers :smashin:
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
Cat6 doesn't stop working because (say) you've put to tight a bend in it (presuming you don't bend it so much you break it.) It just means it may fail cat6 "certification" and (say) only be capable of cat5e performance.
 

Michael

Prominent Member
At £50, I'm sure if they didn't work fast enough, and you couldn't return them, plenty of people would be willing to pay £40 2nd hand.

Also, do you know what sort of wireing your house has?

Generally, the only ones that cause problems are when every room is routed directly to the fuse box, meaning the signal is lost.

However, standard ring-mains work fine: My router is on the ground floor, and my powerline work fine in the attic.
 

shoemaker666

Distinguished Member
the way i did it was to drill a hole in the inside wall and use some cable access rods right up the wall cavity into the loft pulling the cat 6 cable up into the loft. then drill a hole in the bedroom wall, run the cable access rods up into the loft attach the cable end you've just fed there. and then pull that end down into the bedroom.

then make off the ends into a nice fact plate on the wall hey presto link from lounge to bedroom.

i did this with my home network cant see any of it just the fact plates now have TV and a wired network to every room in the house.
 

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