Room recommendations

Kingchin

Active Member
We have all had a bit of banter with each other :laugh: but I think we can all agree the enjoyment we get out of listening to our favourite artists 🎶

Now who likes classical, rock, rap, folk, metal, trance, jazz music and who doesn't. Which is the best genre of music 🤔😆 ko just enjoy your music folks.
 

DT79

Well-known Member
@Kingchin you’ve got a room that you can do anything you want in and no one to answer to, so you can go nuts on your hifi and room treatments etc. Good for you.

However I do think that you are underestimating how clever RoomPerfect is and just how good of a job it can do. Whilst you may like, or be blind, to the aesthetics of an acoustically treated room, the vast majority of people wouldn’t even countenance doing that to a domestic living space and RP really is good enough to mean that you’ll never miss out from not doing so.
 

Steve356

Distinguished Member
We have all had a bit of banter with each other :laugh: but I think we can all agree the enjoyment we get out of listening to our favourite artists 🎶

Now who likes classical, rock, rap, folk, metal, trance, jazz music and who doesn't. Which is the best genre of music 🤔😆 ko just enjoy your music folks.

That one is easy and not for debate. The only genre worth listening to is Classical Metal Rap piped through GigaWatt amps so loud that the foundations shake and your ears scream for mercy. No need for any room treatments or room correction with that. ;) :rotfl: :thumbsup:


EDIT: On reflection (pun intended), maybe a padded cell afterwards. :laugh:
 

Paul7777x

Distinguished Member
Only the second time I’ve had to put someone on ‘ignore’ ever on the internet.

And the first time because of tediousness to the point of exhaustion.

I live and learn.
 

Kingchin

Active Member
@Kingchin you’ve got a room that you can do anything you want in and no one to answer to, so you can go nuts on your hifi and room treatments etc. Good for you.

However I do think that you are underestimating how clever RoomPerfect is and just how good of a job it can do. Whilst you may like, or be blind, to the aesthetics of an acoustically treated room, the vast majority of people wouldn’t even countenance doing that to a domestic living space and RP really is good enough to mean that you’ll never miss out from not doing so.
I think people are getting the wrong idea that I'm anti room correction, I'm definitely not. And while I've not heard RoomPerfect I've spent many hours reading up various articles about it and user experiences. Peter Lyngdorf is a very clever guy and it's good he brought a simple to use room correction to the market that doesn't adversely affect the speakers natural sound.

But your statement with RoomPerfect you'll never miss from using acoustic room treatment is incorrect. Every room structure has problems and the only way to fix it is with acoustic room treatment absorbers and diffusers for the reflections, mids and highs. You should go visit a proper acoustically treated room and you will hear the big difference compared to a untreated room.

Maybe in the future I'll give room correction a try to see if it will improve the sound performance further on top of my acoustic room treatments. Room correction for only the lower frequencies around 250Hz and below. While still keeping my room treatments that do enhance mostly the mid and high frequencys.

What RoomPerfect, Trinnov, DIRAC etc also won't do is reduce reverb times. If your only using room correction and you have wooden/laminate flooring your reverb times will be awful. If you have a carpeted room with some soft furnishings it will be better decent but still not great. Especially if you have hard concrete or brick plaster walls.
PicsArt_04-30-07.36.58.jpg

PicsArt_05-01-08.26.23.jpg
 
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DT79

Well-known Member
I think people are getting the wrong idea that I'm anti room correction, I'm definitely not. And while I've not heard RoomPerfect I've spent many hours reading up various articles about it and user experiences.

Peter Lyngdorf is a very clever guy and it's good he brought a simple to use room correction to the market that doesn't adversely affect the speakers natural sound. Maybe in the future I'll give RoomPerfect a try to see if it will improve the sound performance further on top of my acoustic room treatments.
Cool. If that day ever comes, I recommend you also try removing the room treatments, then running RP again and seeing what you make of the sound.
 

Hear Here

Active Member
You are missing the point that speaker manufacturers make speakers to give the best response in an anechoic chamber because it is impractical to design something to cover every room or situation. You're argument is trying to find way to discredit room correction by developing an idea that is non-sensical and as you have said the 'What Rubbish - Heaven forbid' only really applies to your skewed argument. You really haven't heard a well implemented room correction system have you?

One of the major buyer groups reported by the dealers for the eye wateringly expensive (for us mere mortals) Steinway Lyngdorf systems which includes RoomPerfect, are musicians because they claim it reproduces closest to their original sound - go figure.

But if you want to decorate your room with large blocks of foam or anti reflection panels in an attempt to temper the damage a room can impart then enjoy :thumbsup: . I know what I prefer.
You are either be deliberately missing the point or perhaps you are so convinced that DSP is the best thing since sliced bread you have ignored some basic facts of acoustic life.

You mention Steinway so let’s consider a lovely Steinway grand piano standing on a stage in Concert Hall A. It sounds wonderful to every member of the audience despite some sitting in one part of the auditorium and others in another. No need to "DSP" the piano. I’m sure you agree.

Now move the piano to Concert Hall B. Do you think the piano should now be "DSP'd" because it's in a different room with different acoustics? No, both rooms are carefully set up (and the piano carefully positioned) so we enjoy both performances despite obvious differences in the sound entering your ears.

Now put a grotty old upright in these halls. It will never sound as good however much you DSP the sound. Again I presume you agree.

So, going back to my initial posting in this thread. I suggested:

Firstly get the room sounding right by sensible furnishings, etc

Install a suitable speaker that compliments the room's features

Add a little room treatment if you have the skills and it doesn't spoil the room - remember that I've said this twice before though you seem to ignore it

Lastly, and only if you've failed in getting the sound good, resort to DSP.

I'm pleased that others here appreciate the huge importance of the earlier stages in accomplishing excellent sound.

Looking at it another way, let's say you're listening room is a concrete cylinder with no carpet or furnishing. It will sound truly dreadful even with your award-winning speakers. OK your solution is to feed your speakers via an amp with DSP. Will it suddenly sound good? No of course it won't. It'll still suffer echo / reverberation, etc that no DSP could eliminate. I’m sure you'll agree this.

Now lay a carpet and furnish the room carefully, maybe change the type of speaker to suit the room (for example planars sound rubbish in my own room, DSP or not) and add a bit of room treatment. Now you should start to get a pleasant sound. Perhaps it could be further improved with DSP - probably yes in this particularly tricky room. I hope you are starting to get the point.

OK, next - put your great speakers in an exceptionally good room - akin to a recording studio or concert hall. I'm sure you wouldn't suggest it will need DSP to improve the sound. Your exceptional speakers will astonish you and your friends at the lifelike and exciting performance - even without DSP.

Now let's say you can't afford these wonderful speakers but you still have the wonderful room. You build some DIY speakers that includes a good bass driver and a good tweeter in a home-built box and a basic crossover. The drivers between them can produce a 30 Hz frequency and also an 18K Hz frequency and everything between. You don't have the skills to tune your speakers so they sound pretty dreadful. Do you think that adding DSP will make them as good as a £20K speaker system that's been designed by a respected builder and received rave reviews? You may say that your rubbish speakers have the same Seas drivers so they should sound the same by adding DSP. You are kidding yourself!

Sorry chum, you won't get a silk purse from a sow's ear however you look at it. DSP is no substitute for careful choice of speaker and careful attention to room's furnishings. If in practice DSP make a "massive improvement" then this speaks volumes about your room and / or your choice of speaker. If DSP makes little or no difference, then you have done a much better job.

If it sounds worse, in that some of the life is sucked out of the music (more MP3 than CD), it means that your system doesn't need DSP and in fact the additional signal processing that DSP entails (and please don't think it doesn't process the signal) has caused the excitement factor to be reduced. The additional signal processing has compromised the sparkle factor in a similar way that MP3 soils things compared with CD sound. I'm pleased to say that I've found this in my own system. If I engage DSP, a little of that recorded Steinway grand piano's excitement (the goosebump / tingle factor) is lost and I don't enjoy the music as much, despite it being marginally more accurate in the bass area.

Some speakers (and Steinway Lyngdorf may well be an example) have separate amps for each driver and the bass amp can include DSP to adjust for room acoustic problems with no ill effects, but I bet you a pound to a penny that the best of this type of speaker (including my own Avantgardes) will not subject the treble to the additional processing that DSP requires.

Think carefully about the scenarios I've described and (if you still believe that DSP is the answer to all acoustic problems), please address my point with a degree of logic. The important thing in life is enjoying what we enjoy and the way we achieve enjoyment in music is irrelevant. I’ve chosen to spend a ton of cash on exceptional speakers and I’ve hugely improved the acoustics in my difficult listening room without resorting to artificial room treatment. DSP processing (including RoomPerfect in a loan Lyngdorf TDAI-3400) compromises the excitement factor.

I’m happy though I know I can improve things further. You seem to achieve total enjoyment by simply adding a DSP processor. As long as we are both happy, that’s all that really matters.
 

Paul7777x

Distinguished Member
Ah... ‘the excitement factor’... that eminently measurable not nonsense :facepalm:
 

Helix Hifi

Well-known Member
My two cents... Back in the day when I first listened to a proper hifi setup at my local dealer I really liked the sound. In my listing room not so much. Hard sterile sound. Then I learned from a friend to put up some more normal things in the room. Sofa, bookshelf etc. All this helps since the speakers then don’t bounce the sound off the walls etc. Now the book shelves etc well absorb sound so it sound better. And I must say since that day I’ve been pretty happy. It is perfect, probably not. But what I don’t miss, well I don’t miss it...
 

Helix Hifi

Well-known Member
Still I don’t think I wanna rearrange my room to a home studio, therefore I welcome digital room correction. We all hear different...
 

Kingchin

Active Member
Cool. If that day ever comes, I recommend you also try removing the room treatments, then running RP again and seeing what you make of the sound.
My wall room treatments aren't for dealing with any bass room issues I might encounter, especially the low bass subwoofers produce. My acoustic panels will absorb dampen a little of the low frequencies but not much.

They are to greatly help through absorption and diffusion scattering of the mids and highs. As above 300Hz or so it's impossible to counter to any worthwhile effect with any kind of room correction EQ, including RoomPerfect.

So I will look more into room correction solutions just specifically to deal with 300Hz and below. But once the funds replenish after I get a new Sony A90J or Panasonic JZ1500 OLED this summer. 😆
 
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Kingchin

Active Member
Still I don’t think I wanna rearrange my room to a home studio, therefore I welcome digital room correction. We all hear different...
I don't want my living room to look like a home studio either. Granted the polycylindrical diffuser/absorber is big (too big for many people's tastes) But it's the same colour white as that wall, blends in well looks better in person than the close up photo's. I don't mind stuff on the walls as long as it blends in with the room decor.

Some of the other diffuser panels I've ordered and still to get delivered have very stylish unique designs. They look like nice sculptured wooden art pieces. The proof is in the pudding as they say lol, and I will be creating a thread showing my finished living room with all the panels up.
 
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larkone

Distinguished Member
You are either be deliberately missing the point or perhaps you are so convinced that DSP is the best thing since sliced bread you have ignored some basic facts of acoustic life.

You mention Steinway so let’s consider a lovely Steinway grand piano standing on a stage in Concert Hall A. It sounds wonderful to every member of the audience despite some sitting in one part of the auditorium and others in another. No need to "DSP" the piano. I’m sure you agree.

Now move the piano to Concert Hall B. Do you think the piano should now be "DSP'd" because it's in a different room with different acoustics? No, both rooms are carefully set up (and the piano carefully positioned) so we enjoy both performances despite obvious differences in the sound entering your ears.

Now put a grotty old upright in these halls. It will never sound as good however much you DSP the sound. Again I presume you agree.

So, going back to my initial posting in this thread. I suggested:

Firstly get the room sounding right by sensible furnishings, etc

Install a suitable speaker that compliments the room's features

Add a little room treatment if you have the skills and it doesn't spoil the room - remember that I've said this twice before though you seem to ignore it

Lastly, and only if you've failed in getting the sound good, resort to DSP.

I'm pleased that others here appreciate the huge importance of the earlier stages in accomplishing excellent sound.

Looking at it another way, let's say you're listening room is a concrete cylinder with no carpet or furnishing. It will sound truly dreadful even with your award-winning speakers. OK your solution is to feed your speakers via an amp with DSP. Will it suddenly sound good? No of course it won't. It'll still suffer echo / reverberation, etc that no DSP could eliminate. I’m sure you'll agree this.

Now lay a carpet and furnish the room carefully, maybe change the type of speaker to suit the room (for example planars sound rubbish in my own room, DSP or not) and add a bit of room treatment. Now you should start to get a pleasant sound. Perhaps it could be further improved with DSP - probably yes in this particularly tricky room. I hope you are starting to get the point.

OK, next - put your great speakers in an exceptionally good room - akin to a recording studio or concert hall. I'm sure you wouldn't suggest it will need DSP to improve the sound. Your exceptional speakers will astonish you and your friends at the lifelike and exciting performance - even without DSP.

Now let's say you can't afford these wonderful speakers but you still have the wonderful room. You build some DIY speakers that includes a good bass driver and a good tweeter in a home-built box and a basic crossover. The drivers between them can produce a 30 Hz frequency and also an 18K Hz frequency and everything between. You don't have the skills to tune your speakers so they sound pretty dreadful. Do you think that adding DSP will make them as good as a £20K speaker system that's been designed by a respected builder and received rave reviews? You may say that your rubbish speakers have the same Seas drivers so they should sound the same by adding DSP. You are kidding yourself!

Sorry chum, you won't get a silk purse from a sow's ear however you look at it. DSP is no substitute for careful choice of speaker and careful attention to room's furnishings. If in practice DSP make a "massive improvement" then this speaks volumes about your room and / or your choice of speaker. If DSP makes little or no difference, then you have done a much better job.

If it sounds worse, in that some of the life is sucked out of the music (more MP3 than CD), it means that your system doesn't need DSP and in fact the additional signal processing that DSP entails (and please don't think it doesn't process the signal) has caused the excitement factor to be reduced. The additional signal processing has compromised the sparkle factor in a similar way that MP3 soils things compared with CD sound. I'm pleased to say that I've found this in my own system. If I engage DSP, a little of that recorded Steinway grand piano's excitement (the goosebump / tingle factor) is lost and I don't enjoy the music as much, despite it being marginally more accurate in the bass area.

Some speakers (and Steinway Lyngdorf may well be an example) have separate amps for each driver and the bass amp can include DSP to adjust for room acoustic problems with no ill effects, but I bet you a pound to a penny that the best of this type of speaker (including my own Avantgardes) will not subject the treble to the additional processing that DSP requires.

Think carefully about the scenarios I've described and (if you still believe that DSP is the answer to all acoustic problems), please address my point with a degree of logic. The important thing in life is enjoying what we enjoy and the way we achieve enjoyment in music is irrelevant. I’ve chosen to spend a ton of cash on exceptional speakers and I’ve hugely improved the acoustics in my difficult listening room without resorting to artificial room treatment. DSP processing (including RoomPerfect in a loan Lyngdorf TDAI-3400) compromises the excitement factor.

I’m happy though I know I can improve things further. You seem to achieve total enjoyment by simply adding a DSP processor. As long as we are both happy, that’s all that really matters.
TL;DR Though I believe for the first public test of a SL system they used a Steinway piano and a SL system behind a curtain on stage and asked the audience to distinguish between them - apparently they couldn't - good enough for me.
 
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Kingchin

Active Member
TL;DR Though I believe for the first public test of a SL system they used a Steinway piano and a SL system behind a curtain on stage and asked the audience to distinguish between them - apparently they couldn't - good enough for me.
Public tests like these by the manufacturers without any neutral unbiased third party involvement to ensure the test conditions are completely fair should be taken with a pinch of salt.

There's no way any room correction system plus speakers playing in a concert hall would fool a person into thinking it's a pianist playing on a grand piano in the concert hall. It might fool someone who had never been to a concert hall before with a pianist playing.

Fairer test conditions would of been a third party choosing a random piano recording from a grand piano that wasn't taken from a Steinway piano. Plus no curtain (which degrades sound passing through, and hides what's going on) between the audience and piano, speakers. Instead of a curtain the audience would be blindfolded with the third party monitoring the stage to ensure no underhanded tactics.
 
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Steve356

Distinguished Member
Public tests like these by the manufacturers without any neutral unbiased third party involvement to ensure the test conditions are completely fair should be taken with a pinch of salt.

There's no way any room correction system plus speakers playing in a concert hall would fool a person into thinking it's a pianist playing on a grand piano in the concert hall. It might fool someone who had never been to a concert hall with a pianist playing before.

Fairer test conditions would of been a third party choosing a random piano recording from a grand piano that wasn't taken from a Steinway piano. Plus no curtain (which degrades sound passing through, and hides what's going on) between the audience and piano, speakers. Instead of a curtain the audience would be blindfolded.

Oh dear...... There really is no hope for you. :laugh: :facepalm:
 

Kingchin

Active Member
Oh dear...... There really is no hope for you. :laugh: :facepalm:
Don't be so naive 😆🤦🏾‍♂️ It's no secret a lot of manufacturers (not all) use underhanded tactics in similar public tests to tip the odds in their favour.

Similarly you wouldn't just take a manufacturers word on a pair of speakers being excellent and then buy them. You would then look at reviews from respected reviewers, plus some owners actual experiences with the speakers.

Back to speakers and real instruments. No speakers even the best performing will ever sound like a actual musical instrument. The illusion from speakers can be good but isn't going to trick anyone unless they have hearing problems.
 
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Steve356

Distinguished Member
Don't be so naive 😆🤦🏾‍♂️ It's no secret a lot of manufacturers (not all) use underhanded tactics in similar public tests to tip the odds in their favour.

Similarly you wouldn't just take a manufacturers word on a pair of speakers and buy them. You would then look at reviews from respected reviewers, plus owners actual experiences with the speakers.

No naivety here chap. I've been fortunate to hear for myself numerous Lyngdorf and Steinway Lyngdorf systems in different rooms. Read numerous reviews too. Keep digging!
 

Kingchin

Active Member
No naivety here chap. I've been fortunate to hear for myself numerous Lyngdorf and Steinway Lyngdorf systems in different rooms. Read numerous reviews too. Keep digging!
No digging dude. You never read the previous comments properly that my comment was in reply to Larkone saying a public comparison test in a concert hall. Between a pianist playing a piano and a Steinway system and speakers playing back a recording of the pianist -
PicsArt_04-30-09.07.08.jpg


I never said anything about someone hearing a room correction system and speakers in a dealership. You wouldn't hear a musician playing a musical instrument at a dealership lol. And if you actually did it would make you want to book a ticket at a concert. As no speakers can come close to a live musical instrument being played.
 
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Steve356

Distinguished Member
My comment was in reply to Larkone saying a public comparison test in a concert hall between a pianist playing a piano and a Steinway system and speakers playing back a recording of the pianist -
View attachment 1503326

I never said anything about someone hearing a room correction system and speakers in a dealership. You wouldn't hear a musician playing a musical instrument at a dealership lol. And if you actually did it would make you want to book a ticket at a concert. As no speakers can come close to a live musical instrument being played.

Before you make comments like this, you may want to give Steinway Lyngdorf systems a listen.

I would agree that in many cases a live instrument cannot be accurately produced by a HiFi system. The only question I'd raise about that is that one of my neighbours plays drums in a band. I've listened to him play numerous times, both at home and in live venues. Listening to drums on a top line SL system comes very close to what I hear live. That's drums though and if we were talking acoustic guitar for instance, I'd tend to agree with your view.

Anyway, we are probably all guilty of going off topic now. In addition, you clearly believe in room treatment despite not hearing the room correction system in question. Good luck with your quest and I genuinely hope if works out well for you. I have nothing else to contribute to this thread, so I'm out. :)
 

Kingchin

Active Member
Before you make comments like this, you may want to give Steinway Lyngdorf systems a listen.

I would agree that in many cases a live instrument cannot be accurately produced by a HiFi system. The only question I'd raise about that is that one of my neighbours plays drums in a band. I've listened to him play numerous times, both at home and in live venues. Listening to drums on a top line SL system comes very close to what I hear live. That's drums though and if we were talking acoustic guitar for instance, I'd tend to agree with your view.

Anyway, we are probably all guilty of going off topic now. In addition, you clearly believe in room treatment despite not hearing the room correction system in question. Good luck with your quest and I genuinely hope if works out well for you. I have nothing else to contribute to this thread, so I'm out. :)
I done a music course years ago which had a small recording room. I heard musicians playing acoustic guitars and also the recording played back in the same room. While the recording sounded good it didn't sound as good or as real as the musicians playing the acoustic guitars.

Yeah some instruments may be easier to reproduce through speakers than others. I've heard the piano played at concerts a few times but most CDs with piano never sounded as good. The closest I've got is with a live Ludovico Einaudi album that has a very good recording mastering.

Cheers appreciated 🙂 I will eventually be getting some room correction EQ solution to help deal with around 250Hz and below. In combination of the room treatments that deal with the mids and highs. I'm out too, adiós.
 
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Helix Hifi

Well-known Member
I hope I get the opportunity to listen to DSP sometime. But usually the few amplifier with build in Dirac etc are Class D amplifiers. I just don’t like the sound they produce. Yes, the sound is dynamic, but also quite lean in the midrange, not so rich as Class A/AB amplifiers. So I guess I like a bit negative distortion in the sound vs ultra clean sound. Well that’s just me.
 

Hear Here

Active Member
I hope I get the opportunity to listen to DSP sometime. But usually the few amplifier with build in Dirac etc are Class D amplifiers. I just don’t like the sound they produce. Yes, the sound is dynamic, but also quite lean in the midrange, not so rich as Class A/AB amplifiers. So I guess I like a bit negative distortion in the sound vs ultra clean sound. Well that’s just me.
Could I ask when you last listened to a Class D amp and which amp it was? I ask that because Class D development has been like DAC development a decade or two back. Class D had been though a number of significant improvement stages and IMO has now reached the stage when you can get the sound you want from a carefully chosen D amp.

2 years ago, I set out to find as good sounding a SS amp as my SETs were - quite a challenge. I borrowed (home demo from dealers or distributors) or bought used, about a dozen contenders - Class A, AB and D. My experience with Class D many years earlier was not good - Red Wine, Diavelet, Tripath - but I just wanted the best sound irrespective of technology. In the end I chose a Class D amp and I'm very happy with it. Many of the other amps were appreciably more costly and many were also very good including Accuphase A36 (A), Mark Levinson 5805 (AB), GamuT D200 (AB), but the NAD M32 prevailed. In fact I’ve subsequently upgraded to the even better Purifi-based M33.
 

Helix Hifi

Well-known Member
Could I ask when you last listened to a Class D amp and which amp it was? I ask that because Class D development has been like DAC development a decade or two back. Class D had been though a number of significant improvement stages and IMO has now reached the stage when you can get the sound you want from a carefully chosen D amp.

2 years ago, I set out to find as good sounding a SS amp as my SETs were - quite a challenge. I borrowed (home demo from dealers or distributors) or bought used, about a dozen contenders - Class A, AB and D. My experience with Class D many years earlier was not good - Red Wine, Diavelet, Tripath - but I just wanted the best sound irrespective of technology. In the end I chose a Class D amp and I'm very happy with it. Many of the other amps were appreciably more costly and many were also very good including Accuphase A36 (A), Mark Levinson 5805 (AB), GamuT D200 (AB), but the NAD M32 prevailed. In fact I’ve subsequently upgraded to the even better Purifi-based M33.
NAD M33. From my understanding even the analog outputs are fully digital, not like the M10. So that means you can use Dirac by using the analog outputs. That is very clever. Even though both the M10, M33 are Class D amplifiers (switch mode amplifiers) I guess one can say the M33 is fully digital all the way trough. The M33 was tested at my local dealer. Room at local hifi dealers can be dreadful to very good. This room is quite good with some small acoustic treatments to it. I believe there is a diffuser behind the speakers seen from the listing chair. As said the sound is quite lean, not so rich in the vocals etc. But of course my dealer didn’t wanna turn on Dirac, that may change my mind. I compared to the Hegel H190. Much better sound.
 

Hear Here

Active Member
NAD M33. From my understanding even the analog outputs are fully digital, not like the M10. So that means you can use Dirac by using the analog outputs. That is very clever. Even though both the M10, M33 are Class D amplifiers (switch mode amplifiers) I guess one can say the M33 is fully digital all the way trough. The M33 was tested at my local dealer. Room at local hifi dealers can be dreadful to very good. This room is quite good with some small acoustic treatments to it. I believe there is a diffuser behind the speakers seen from the listing chair. As said the sound is quite lean, not so rich in the vocals etc. But of course my dealer didn’t wanna turn on Dirac, that may change my mind. I compared to the Hegel H190. Much better sound.
By "analogue outputs" do you mean analogue inputs? Yes any analogue input you feed the M33 will first be digitised. The M33 has analogue outputs (to extra amps or subs) and digital outpuuts (optical and coax) for an external DAC. I chose not to engage the Dirac filter as it slightly spoils the sound, despite making the sub 500 Hz frequencies a little more accurate. But that's with my own speakers in my own roon - many claim massive improvements with DSP but I suspect they haven't first tried other methods to achieve good sound
 

Helix Hifi

Well-known Member
By "analogue outputs" do you mean analogue inputs? Yes any analogue input you feed the M33 will first be digitised. The M33 has analogue outputs (to extra amps or subs) and digital outpuuts (optical and coax) for an external DAC. I chose not to engage the Dirac filter as it slightly spoils the sound, despite making the sub 500 Hz frequencies a little more accurate. But that's with my own speakers in my own roon - many claim massive improvements with DSP but I suspect they haven't first tried other methods to achieve good sound
Yes, sorry analog inputs. But we’re exactly is the transformer located inside of the M33? The black box? I suspect the print board to the right side of the unit is the wifiboard/Dac.
 

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