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room design

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Buying & Building' started by rosey9393, Mar 19, 2005.

  1. rosey9393

    rosey9393
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    Hello, this is my first thread. I am looking for design info on determining good room demension on a dedicated theater space. Beginning room size is 31' X 26.5' X 9.75'. There are no restrictions on final size, only that keeping the space as large as is acousticly possible. Ive played with the Home theater spread sheet program including using goal search with much frustration. Maybe Im just unrealistic in my result hopes. Ive only gotten it down to 8 problem freq's. Anyone with knowledge on getting a better result or better program to play with would be much apeciated!!!!!!!!! Rosey
     
  2. hornydragon

    hornydragon
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    for this sort of thing a pro consultant is worth employing at the planning stage to get it spot (cheaper this way by miles) try Cedia for people who can help..
     
  3. Resonance

    Resonance
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    That's a good problem to have and a nice size space. :thumbsup:

    A few thoughts...

    To help you at least understand some of the standing wave frequencies you could look at one of the web-based calculators, such as http://www.mcsquared.com/modecalc.htm or try a search on 'room mode' for others.

    Ideally your room would have non-parallel sides and be made of something that isn't going to vibrate too much - maybe concrete or high density brick. I don't know which part of the world you are in or what type of construction techniques are used where you are, but I would avoid wooden floors and walls, as I believe they are all too easy to resonate at audible frequencies.
    Also consider the finishing of the room - hang acoustically absorbing material around the edge - the job curtains do in most rooms.

    Then when it's all finished, invites us all round for a demo. :D

    Ian.
     
  4. GCLP

    GCLP
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    Hi, that's my first thread.

    I agree parallel sides are the worth you can do for stationary waves, but It's also the easiest and common sizes at our houses, and with a few and easy to use programs (free at the www) you can make it with a not so bad modal response distribution, and place speakers and listening position where you listen as low as possible increased spl (due to the room) all standing waves.

    And what's that size? Golden ratio, Fi number... All in one is to distribute all the modal frequencies such that each two continuous (in frequency) modals were not so next as 5% of its frequencie value, and not so far as 20 Hz each other.

    Sorry for my english, I think at least you understand what I wanted to explain. Thanks.

    Best regards.
     

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