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Ripping bluray from June 1st

mark1000

Distinguished Member
Hi, not sure this is the right forum to ask this, if not please move.

As from the 1st of June if i understand it right, i have the right to rip/copy my media to digital format, my ? is, if i already own the movie, can i just DL a digital rip or do i have to rip my own copy of the movie i own.

Regards,


Mark.
 

probedb

Banned
I don't believe that's the case. To rip BR/DVD you have to defeat the copy protection which I don't believe has been allowed? I could be wrong. CDs don't have such protection (well apart from the crap that Sony tried to pull with stupid Copy Protection) so are fine.
 

mark1000

Distinguished Member
Thanks for clarifying guys, like i said, i wasn't sure i understood it TBH.

Regards,


Mark.
 

smackos

Prominent Member
From June 1st YOU will be able to backup your dvd, cd or ebook collection quite legally. However you still cannot download a copy of something that originated from someone else's copy. Does that make sense?

So you could quite legally backup a dvd, store it on HDD or push it to cloud storage. You could then download THAT owned cloud copy legally again, since it was yours to start with. You couldn't legally download from somebody elses Cloud copy, even if you own the media physically.

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-...inally-make-it-legal-to-copy-cds-9225491.html
 
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Pecker

Distinguished Member
But I'm not sure if the final question is answered.

It's been implicitly illegal to rip your own discs, AND to by-pass copy protection.

Ripping has been legalised, but what about by-passing copy protection?

Is that still illegal?

In addition, if it's legal -indeed, a right - to copy something you own, isn't copy protection (something preventing access to something for which you legally own) implicitly illegal?

Steve W
 

smackos

Prominent Member
Ah I see.

" Copyright owners will still be able to apply copy protection to their products, but customers will have the right to raise a complaint with the secretary of state if they find it too restrictive.

Both Houses of Parliament will debate the measure before they become law."

In which case then, honestly.. what has actually changed!?
Given that EVERY DVD or Blu-ray purchased has some form of DRM that fully prohibits any kind of backing up, then there is literally no way in which you can LEGALLY obtain that backup still.
 

Pecker

Distinguished Member
Cheers, I missed that bit.

The good news is that, with that clause in the act, the CPS wouldn't try to prosecute for by-passing copy protection, as long as you were making copies for yourself.

Your lawyer would ensure they sent it to the government, and there'd be an order telling them to remove it for being too restrictive before you ever got to court, at which point the whole thing falls down anyway.

Steve W
 

Pecker

Distinguished Member
Actually, I do see a downside.

This may effectively force studios to remove copy protection, or at least change it.

Many if our releases are Europe-wide, and they won't want substandard copy protection elsewhere.

This could mean more expensive discs in the UK, or potentially things not getting released at all.

Studios already have a disincentive to release in the UK due to the BBFC charges, and this only adds to it.

Nonetheless, still a good thing.

Steve W
 

mentasm

Distinguished Member
Maybe it'll force them to create UK specific disc that aren't quality-compromised by the inclusion of loads of European languages ;)
 

figrin_dan

Established Member
Am I the only one who thought that the news item was an April Fools joke?
 
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mark1000

Distinguished Member
If you mean my ?, no not a joke, but legitimate question, although i'm not sure about the answer, can i rip or not.

Mark.
 

P-P-S-S

Prominent Member
Maybe it'll force them to create UK specific disc that aren't quality-compromised by the inclusion of loads of European languages ;)

I wasnt aware that the inclusion of other languages affects quality?

If you mean my ?, no not a joke, but legitimate question, although i'm not sure about the answer, can i rip or not.

Mark.

I'm still not sure on whether I can ripa Bluray for personal use or not either.
 

mentasm

Distinguished Member
I wasnt aware that the inclusion of other languages affects quality?
It does, or rather it can do. BD has a max combined bitrate for audio/video streams, so the more of the former you have the less headroom here is for the latter. While audio uses lossless compression, video is lossy, so bit-starved encodes can affect overall quality. Then you have situations like The Avengers, where the censorship laws of another country have a negative impact on the UK home video release because companies figure it's easier and cheaper to use one master for the whole of Europe...
 

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