Right to die

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by nonumb, Aug 16, 2012.

  1. nonumb

    nonumb
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    Tony Nicklinson has lost his court case allowing him to be killed by a doctor.

    What are your opinions on this? Personally I think that it his absolute right to die if he wants to. He is clearly miserable and suffering, and it's obvious to me that he is not making a rash decision.

    Imo if any of his organs are suitable for transplant he should be allowed to die and give up his organs so that others who want to live can.
     
  2. liamt

    liamt
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    i agree.

    my father has parkinsons and is a shell of the man i once knew. he asked me many years ago that if he ended up in a real mess if i would sort him out. at the time i said yes but every year i can now see it getting closer to that. scary as hell.

    at the end of the day i would put a sick animal down if it had zero quality of life. why not the same with a human?

    the problem, of course, is the people who will try to abuse it to get rid of old granny who is loaded.
     
  3. wookielover

    wookielover
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    Its not so much his right to die as more the rights of the Dr to avoid jail for murder/manslaughter.

    But he should be allowed to end his life and at least have that control.
     
  4. nonumb

    nonumb
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    Sorry to hear about your dad, a friend of mines mum has ms and often doesn't know who he is.

    If the law were to be changed then there would be massive safeguards in place to ensure that you couldn't bump off old relatives, but in a case like this I can't really see why not. He is of sound mind, wants to die and can't. He is miserable and suffering.

    I agree with the point about animals but it is different because the animal cannot communicate its wishes but this man can.
     
  5. TONYELISE

    TONYELISE
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    Me to
    My mum passed a few months back with parkinsons and the last year or so was terrible,as you said if she was a animal she would have been put down ages ago what was worse was the fact when she was first diagnosed she immdiately saw a solictor signed a dnr and told us all when it got to the point she could not eat or drink anything just to be left to die we had all this in writing and when we looked into taking her abroad we was told we could be charged,i really understand your pain and my deepest sympathys to you and your family.
     
  6. liamt

    liamt
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    he has enough medication to nicely slide away if he needs to. he has been stockpiling them for ages.

    its shocking what they can put people through though. i also get annoyed when the church churp in about stuff... i mean if there is a god, he didnt design us very well did he? look at all the problems we can have.
     
  7. shoestring25

    shoestring25
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    i hate it when old people have dementia and have no idea how to take care of them selves who they are or who anyone else is. what kind of quailty of life is that? why are they forced to remain alive
     
  8. Philly112

    Philly112
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    Well that's actually a completely different situation. Someone with dementia has little or no 'soundness' of mind to be able to make a decision as to whether they want to die or not.

    Phil
     
  9. shoestring25

    shoestring25
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    true but i think its also an issue.
     
  10. paulyoung666

    paulyoung666
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    but he needs someone to give them to him , and therein lies the problem , i would be very surprised if the law ever gets changed .....
     
  11. nonumb

    nonumb
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    Think he was referring to his dad, not the case.
     
  12. MarkR

    MarkR
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    This really is a very tragic and sad case and my heart really goes out to him and his family. I was angry when I heard the verdict earlier and it was more upsetting seeing Tony's reaction.

    I can understand the reasons for the verdict as it would be an open ticket for open murder. I think the way it should be done would be for a new law to come into place where each severe case such as Nick's should be assessed by a panel which then gets approved. I know it sounds extreme but at least each case would be unique and justified.

    I personally think it should be up to the individual if they live or die providing they are sound of mind but I do not think this will ever happen.
     
  13. nonumb

    nonumb
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    Indeed I don't think anyone thinks it should be an easy process and the way you say is fair.
     
  14. paulyoung666

    paulyoung666
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    Apologies f that is the case .......
     
  15. BB3Lions

    BB3Lions
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    So heart wrenching to see his emotional out pour like that.

    If it was someone I loved so much I'd assist him knowing ny time in jail would be easy as I would not feel any guilt..
     
  16. Dave

    Dave
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    I think the pertinent point in all of this is that quite rightly, the courts have refused to rule as ultimately it's a case for parliament to answer, not the courts.

    The law as it currently stands will prosecute anyone who assists the death of someone else, it's high time our elected representatives got their finger out, debated it properly and changed the law.
     
  17. EarthRod

    EarthRod
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    What's the difference between someone loading a syringe with a lethal cocktail and injecting it into a person and killing them, and someone loading a syringe with a lethal cocktail injecting it into a person and killing them?
     
  18. Dave

    Dave
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    I've read your post a few times and can't see one.
     
  19. Rock Danger

    Rock Danger
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    Is this a trap?:confused:
     
  20. Rock Danger

    Rock Danger
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    Where does the do no harm thing come from and why is it against the law still in extreme cases? Was this founded on religion by any chance? Because it sounds something that was bore out of that kinda ********.
     
  21. BB3Lions

    BB3Lions
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    Only if your the one holding the syringe.
     
  22. IronGiant

    IronGiant
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    The "and" is missing from the second scenario... :rolleyes: does that change the meaning?

    Or am I inadvertently going grammar police on you/ :blush:
     
  23. EarthRod

    EarthRod
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    OK, moving on. Assume the first scenario is premeditated murder. What is the second part?


    (IronGiant: the missing 'and' is only a writing mistake!) :)
     
  24. IronGiant

    IronGiant
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    Understood :smashin:

    OK, the first must involve malice aforethought to be murder, the second could involve compassion aforethought, so would still be an unlawful killing but not murder.
     
  25. alphaomega16

    alphaomega16
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    This x1000
     
  26. Sparky83

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    If you assisted someone in this way would you go up in front of a judge, or would a jury be involved?

    Find it hard to see a jury sending someone down.
     
  27. Dave

    Dave
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    A jury would most certainly be involved.

    Whether they would convict on the facts or acquit on their personal beliefs is a matter for the jury.
     
  28. swiftpete

    swiftpete
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    Religious people have no right to interfere in the lives of others IMO, it doesn't stop them though of course.
     
  29. Sparky83

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    I personally think in this situation I myself would take the risk if I knew that my other half was completely 100% sure this was what they wanted.

    I'd take the risk that the jury would possibly not agree with me and my actions and face the consequences that rise from my actions.
     
  30. Tempest

    Tempest
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    I have always wondered if this is legally acceptable.

    If it's a jury trial, and the law been broke is a farce (in the eyes of the jury) can they decide innocent and that's it or not?

    I did hear a long time ago a judge has the power to overrule a jury if they really want to.

    EG: man up for cannabis possession and all the jury members are personally for the legalisation can they just say innocent.
     

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