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RGB vs S-Video

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by id212, Jul 4, 2005.

  1. id212

    id212
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    Hi,

    Sure this topic has been discussed many times, but could not find a definitive answer, so here it goes.

    Currently:

    - my DVD is connected to TV via Scart RGB.
    - my DVD does have a Component out
    - Marantz SR5400 has only S-Video or Component out.
    - my TV does not have a Component in

    In general, I understand RGB is better than S-Video and Component is better than RGB. If I connect my DVD via SR5400 I'll have to use Component-Component or S-Video-S-Video for DVD to AMP and then the only option is S-Video for AMP to TV.

    Hence, the question is if there any point in using SR5400 in video setup (given such connection options)?

    I also think that the more connections between the source and the output the more chances of the signal degradation, in which case I miss the whole point why they make video connections in AV amps/receivers. ;)

    Any thoughts are appreciated.

    Thanks
     
  2. Astaroth

    Astaroth
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    Svideo and RGB are very close in picture quality - to the extent that some sets do actually look better with svideo than RGB.

    You are correct that the longer the total cable length and the more connections the higher the risk of interfence. The options of using AVRs in video generally adds a number of benefits - 1) upconverting (this isnt of use to you) 2) reduces wiring to the TV and connect to this would be the number of sockets your TV has - my tv has 1 set of component inputs but I have 3 sources outputing component so a seperate switch would have to be used if I didnt have my AVR 3) convenience of pressing 1 button to select the sound and video source rather than having to select the TV and AVR sources seperately
     
  3. chedmaster

    chedmaster
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    you could get an RGBs breakout cable from scart and to scart, so you get scart to R, G, B and composite, and connect the RGB parts to component in on amp, the composite (sync) to composite in for the same video on the amp, and then get the same kind of lead and connect it to Component out and Composite out, thus passing through a scart RGBs signal. hope you got that!
     
  4. Mr Incredible

    Mr Incredible
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    Agreed if you do not buy any other kit. Over in the Trade Sales there is a Keene RGB2C converter, which I also have. It will convert two ways: RGB to Component or Component to RGB. So you could output your Amp component to the the convertor and then to the RGB on the TV.

    I use the converter to get my DVD (Component and S-Video only) to an RGB signal which I pass through my Sky Digibox to the RGB on the TV coz the TV has only 1 RGB scart and I wanted best connection for Sky (RGB) and DVD (Componnet to RGB).

    HTH
     
  5. id212

    id212
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    Hi,

    Thanks a lot for all replies. Inspired, I thought lets test if there is much loss in using S-Video instead of RGB.

    I did such a test a while back and found RGB much superior, however didn't repeat the test when I changed upgraded DVD and TV later on assuming that it will be produce the same results... how wrong I was...

    To cut the long story short it appears that at least with a direct link (not via the amp) S-Video is much better than RGB. The picture is much warmer, has more punch but without overblowing it, the colours are more live etc.

    Note that the RGB cable is used is also of higher quality than the S-Video one, so S-Video could only get better ;)

    As a result, I'm now thinking of going an S-Video way. The only question than is if there is any mileage at all in wiring DVD to AMP via component and then S-Video from AMP to TV or just keep it simple and have S-Video cable all through.

    Any thoughts?

    Thanks
     
  6. Mouth on Legs

    Mouth on Legs
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    RGB is 3 high bandwith channels YUV is i high bandwith (Y) and 2 lower ones for the colour. S-video is 2 channel and composite is 1.

    so RGB>YUV>s-video>composite

    although the difference between rbg and yuv is 2/3^0

    if you find s-vid > rgb I would suspect something somewhere
     
  7. Dolbyz

    Dolbyz
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    I seriously find my RGB via SCART much better than the S-VHS. In fact, on my system, S-VHS is only SLIGHTLY better than composite - while RGB SCART is in a league of it's own. I find it especially better when viewing writing (such as interactive news or weather on satellite) - where the letters are bolder, darker and more defined.

    My problem is that my TV set 1x RGB SCART and 1x S-VHS SCART ... and that's it! I have an 2 sources that are RGB SCART, with a potential 3rd coming in a month. On top of that, I use RGB SCART for my PS2 ... so in all I may have 4xRGB SCART devices with only 1x input ... *sigh*
     
  8. Mouth on Legs

    Mouth on Legs
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    look at js-technology.com they have all the answers. They were very helpful back in the dark ages when I bought my plasma screen (all of 2y ago)
     
  9. Astaroth

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    S-VHS was never very good imo and not suprised that you are not impressed with it. S Video technically is a significant improvement on composite and can look better than RGB on certain equipment.

    There are plenty of scart switches you can buy to help out when you have more sources than sockets - JS Tech as Mouth on Legs suggests are probably going to be one of the best. Alternatively you can use it as an excuse to buy a new TV :D
     
  10. id212

    id212
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    MoL: RGB>YUV>s-video>composite

    OK, a bit more reading trying to sort out confusions and here is how it seems to me:

    "RGB>YUV>s-video>composite" -- the order is correct when we are talking about general video encoding.

    However, now consider the sources and the output.

    DVD - "The MPEG-2 encoding system used by DVD is based on color-difference component digital video"

    TV - "All TV sets convert the incoming video signal(s) into RGB. Most TV sets today actually convert all incoming analog broadcasts into component video as an intermediate step."

    As a result if DVD is connected to the TV via Component - TV performs transcoding Component-RGB whereas if a DVD is connected to RGB the DVD performs transcoding.

    Similarly, if connected via S-Video: DVD downconverts Component to S-Video and TV converts S-Video into RGB.

    So, the results of how a picture looks on TV could vary depending on performance of different conversion units and simply using Scart-RGB does not guarantee anything.

    Useful article:
    ttp://www.michaeldvd.com.au/Articles/VideoConnectors/VideoConnectors.asp
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/compon.htm


    Back to reality ;) The fact that on my current set S-Video looks better could be down to that it e.g. my dvd does downconversion to S-Video better than transcoding to RGB... if it makes sense...

    Still I agree it's strange as with my previous set RGB was a clear winner.

    Going to do more testing then ;)

    PS Hence Digital Broadcasting uses MPEG the same argument applies (that the source is Component), so there is no "real" RGB source in consumer electronics...
     
  11. MartinImber

    MartinImber
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    If S-Video is better than RGB there is a fault somewhere in one of the pieces of equipment.

    Almost certainly a design fault but still faulty
     
  12. micks_address

    micks_address
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    just to throw in my thoughts...

    on my tv - sony kv32fq86... i use s-video scart (qed) from my dvd player as it does look better than the rgb setting. This is more down to the equipment than the connection i reckon though. As pointed out to me elsewhere my tv doesnt have its noise reduction software on when rgb signals are fed in - its a design fault as you would say Martin.. it can be turned in via the service menu but goes off when the source changes to something esle

    For some reason i also find the s-video feed from the dvd player easier to adjust.. the dvd player is a sony ns930.. the rgb is just to dark where the s-video looks more natural

    i use rgb from sky plus rather than s-video due to the s-video only coming out of the sky box via an s-video connection and when i connect to the tv i loose the widescreen scart switching which i cant live without...

    I think it really is subjective.. its not just a case of whether s-video is better than rgb... rgb may be technically superior but s-video may look better on the display you have so i would always let my eyes be the judge and go with what you think is best

    all that being said i've just picked up a qed rgb only cable which i'm hoping to have a play around with over the weekend.. who knows i might have changed my mind by then!

    Cheers,
    Mick
     
  13. id212

    id212
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    Well, more testing revealed the following:

    -- RGB picture has definitely higher resolution than S-Video, resuling in the picture being smoother
    -- Out of all Picture controls I've got on TV (Saturation, Hue, Sharpness...) only Brightness works for RGB

    This explains why I was getting "punchier" colours etc with S-Video (which uses picture settings).

    Must admit, personally I'd probably favour colours over a resolution for now untill I get a component-compatible display ;)
     
  14. madcyril

    madcyril
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    Along a similar note then what are the recommendations for connecting Sky + to a Yam 757,S-Video to S-Video or Scart to S-Video
     
  15. id212

    id212
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    Mick:

    Absolutely agree! I think you're right on the money with signal processing contributed by TV.

    As for "widescreen scart switching" as far as I understand today's S-Video could carry extra info that is used for switching aspect ratio. My DVD has two output modes: S1 (video + aspect ratio info 4:3 or 16:9) and S2 (as S1 + letterbox/pan&scan info), so have a look at your sky box it might be also configurable.
     
  16. MartinImber

    MartinImber
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    RGB bypasses all the adjustment stuff - hence the better quality picture, brightness and contrast are tube edjustments, colours - you can adjust in the service menu.

    Contrast & brightness are RGB optimised on my TV as virtally all use is via RGB (including the TVs own tuner)

    composite and s-video go via the colour stuff, sharpness is not applicable to RGB at all, play with DVE on the sharpness screen - you see all the detail and no haloing.
     

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