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RGB Scart to Component - Without paying a fortune

Discussion in 'Cables & Switches' started by Bada Bing, Sep 24, 2004.

  1. Bada Bing

    Bada Bing
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    I've read through these forums and people are consistently asking the same question (myself included until recently), so why not make a sticky explaining the answer?

    Firstly, the RGB signals from either a Component piece of equipment or an RGB Scart piece of equipment are very similar. The difference as far as you or I are concerned is where the H&V Sync signal is. In Component signals, it's in the Green cable, and by default, your Component inputs are configured to look for the signal there. On an RGB Scart signal, it's embedded in the Composite video signal on pin 19.

    Now you can spend upwards of £130 on a converter to break down your RGB Scart and split out your Sync signals making them suitable for Component video. But it costs a fair bit of money, and adds another box and PSU to your equipment rack.

    I prefer the low-tech method. Buy yourself a Scart to 5-phono cable like the QED AV19, which splits the important pins (for RGB Video) onto Phono connectors. Hook up the R,G, and B phono's to the relevant Component inputs on your TV, and then connect the Sync cable to your Composite input on your TV.

    You're now inputting a valid RGB signal to your TV from a Scart device, your TV just doesn't know it yet. On my Panasonic W5, I have to bring up the Setup window and change "RGB" from "Component" to "RGB". I then go down to the "Signal" menu and change the Sync location from "on Green" to "on Video".

    All being well you should now get a picture when your TV is set to Component, and it should be considerably better than the Composite signal you were getting before. Obviously Plasma's/LCD-TV's menu's and inputs will vary, but on the whole I suspect this method should work on most Flat-Panel TV's.

    You could very easily make a cable yourself to do this by searching for the "scart pinouts" on Google, and simply putting R,G,B signal pins and their grounds onto 3 phono's and the Composite Sync onto another. If you have enough bits to butcher, you can have RGB Scart via Component for free! Give it a go, it's a hell of a lot cheaper than the alternative!
     
  2. Joe Fernand

    Joe Fernand
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    Hello Miles

    There are going to be a whole lot of unused butchered cables and frustrated cable butchers if everyone follows your methods :)

    The majority of displays DON'T have the ability to Input RGB with Sync on Composite - anyone contemplating this connectivity method will have to read through there respective User Manual before attacking an unsuspecting SCART cable.

    On the whole there are two types of RGB converter box myself and others tend to use - RGB2VGA (which converts RGB+Composite Sync to RGB with separate Horizontal and Vertical Sync) and RGB2YUV (which converts RGB+Composite Sync to YUV with Sync on Y).

    In addition to making an RGB signal compatible with a huge range of Displays using a decent converter (JS Technology) - the converters ensures a stable signal level from your Digibox; which are not designed to the tightest tolerances around and often even with a Display that will work with RGB + Sync on Composite you can have connectivity problems due to the quality of the signal being generated from the Digibox.

    We also use the RGB2YUV converter extensively when a customer wants to use an AV Receiver or external switcher to pre switch multiple YUV signals - again you don't get many AV Receivers that can switch RGB + Sync on Composite.

    Best regards

    Joe

    PS I find Sticky's don't work - folk who are new to the technology look through the Sticky's and still prefer to post a question.
     
  3. Bada Bing

    Bada Bing
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    I've had zero problems with running mine straight from the digibox, and the signal is super-clean. I'm just fed up with this idea that AV interconnects have to be expensive.

    I have a 3 grand telly hooked up with a £6 passive switchbox for my component inputs and it looks perfect. I hate the message from all the magazines and retailers that you must buy platinum coated phono cables, and £300 component switchboxes if you want a decent signal, because it's garbage.

    I stopped buying AV mags years ago, when I realised how corrupt the reviews were. How can you honestly review a piece of speaker cable! :laugh:

    A £50 (or free if you make it yourself) cable does a fantastic job of getting RGB into your plasma or LCD TV, (of course) as long as your display will allow. It definitely works on Panasonic's, and it's only a quick read of your manual way to see if it works on your set.

    Nothing ventured nothing gained.
     
  4. Joe Fernand

    Joe Fernand
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    Hello Miles

    I do understand your frustration that folk like me earn a living in this industry :)- if we weren't here the products would be Free!!!

    Please note not all Panasonic Displays work with RGB+Composite sync as per your instructions - the current 6 Series don't; and as most folk have been buying these of late its not much use telling them the old model worked differently!!!

    The majority of Display's I supply don't have any video boards installed - so again no Composite Input to make the connection as per your instructions.

    Most customers these days tend to use YUV switching on an AV Receiver and very few if any AV Receivers can mix and match RGB+C and YUV - an active RGB2YUV converter is essential for this type of set-up.

    Great that you've found a low cost solution works for you - though it must be the only passive switch on the planet than can pass 720P without signal degradation; again many of our customers are now outputting 720P which places more onus on switchers and cables than 480i or 576i.

    Any cables, switchers etc I supply can be returned if a customer feels they don't match the sales pitch!

    Best regards

    Joe
     

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