RGB etc

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by curlywatts, May 7, 2002.

  1. curlywatts

    curlywatts
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    After reading a few letters on this site about video signals, (please forgive me if I say something which sounds stupid to all of you with the know how) am I right in thinking there are four choices of connecting for instance a DVD player to a TV.
    Component.
    RGB
    S-Video
    Compsite.
    Now I asume that if you connect a RGB OUT to an RGB IN you get the RGB Video signal and the same applys for the S-video to S-video(S-video signal)?
    Also If you connect an RGB OUT to a scart that doesn't have RGB, is that when you get a composite signal?

    This is my understanding at the moment, my final question is what is component, which I have read is the best way of connection. What sort of connector does it use and how do you know if equipment is capable of using this signal?

    If anyone understands my mumblings I would be grateful.:confused:
     
  2. Dan5

    Dan5
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    I have pasted an extracted from http://www.audiovideo101.com/dictionary/component-video.asp
    this should answer your question. Check out the site for any other questions you have.

    "Method of transferring video information using multiple, individual signals such as red, green and blue (RGB) or luminance, luminance minus blue, and luminance minus red (Y-Y/B-Y/R or Y-Pb-Pr) resulting in the highest quality signal transfer and lowest distortion.

    Component video is a feature of DVDs allowing video information to be transmitted in its individual pieces for perfect reproduction without errors due to combining and then separating the various parts of the color video signal. Component video uses three coaxial video cables with RCA connectors (some components use BNC connectors) to transfer the three signal components. This allows the signal to bypass the distortion-prone process of breaking the signal up into its various components and instead go cleanly to reproduction of the image. Component video is the best method presently available to the consumer for transferring video signals. "
     
  3. Reiner

    Reiner
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    I beg to differ:

    Though the picture information on your DVD is recorded in YUV, the CRT of a TV needs a RGB(HV) signal - so it merely depends where you do the decoding: using component connection the TV will do it, using the RGB out the DVD player will do it.

    For PS (progressive scan) YUV connection seems to be the preferred choice, but you need a compatible display device.

    I think the statements like above mostly apply for US consumers who don't have RGB/Scart but Component instead, so for them that's the best choice.

    Thus I rate RGB as good as component, closely followed by S-Video and way behind Composite.
     
  4. Dan5

    Dan5
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    Reiner,

    What you say is correct. The quote I posted is from a US site and so RGB is not being considered.
    So whether you use RGB or Component is really down to what leads you have and inputs/ouputs on your tv/dvd.

    Dan
     

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