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Review of "INTERSTELLA 5555: The 5tory Of The 5ecret 5tar 5ystem"

Discussion in 'Movie Forum' started by PoochJD, Jun 21, 2004.

  1. PoochJD

    Well-known Member

    Aug 28, 2000
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    Hi Folks,

    This little disc may have slipped past many of you, and as far as I am aware, there's been no reviews of it on websites or DVD magazines, which is a shame.

    This is an unusual film, in that it's not only an hour-long pop video, but an hour-long movie as well. If you love the music of French band Daft Punk, but hate anime, or vice versa, then you will love this title.

    The movie is really Daft Punk's idea of creating a short story based around their music from their "Discovery" album, and is an oddball piece about the power of manufactured pop bands, the natiure of being a celebrity, and music itself. Partly comedic, partly drama, and partly a musical, the film follows a fictional band who are kidnapped from Earth, and transported to a secret planet, before being forced to become the latest manufactured pop band, run by a tyrannical (and inhuman) music manager.

    Anime legend, Mr Leiji Matsumoto provided the amazing visuals for the film, and his trademark "blue-skin people" fit well with the retro-70's animation that he provides. Bear in mind, this is the man who created the 70's anime classic "Starblazers".

    Despite its premise, the film works, both as a musical and a movie, in their own rights. The plot is clever, funny and intricate, and the music is one of the better soundtracks to a movie I've heard, even though I'm not the biggest Daft Punk fan around. It's also effective, even though there is almost no script. The story is effectively carried along by the occasional sound effect (a heavy rainstorm, or tyres squealing during a getaway scene) and the songs themselves, and the film doesn't outstay its welcome, even though it is very short.

    For me, some of the best moments, are the little in-jokes that can be found littered throughout the film. Highlights include a TV screen showing a football match, with Japan beating France 7-2, and a sly dig at the manufacturing of pop music in general, with a machine that pumps out clones of Aretha Franklin, Ry Cooder and several other well-known musicians! (One of the band themselves, resembles the character of Huggy Bear in the recent film version of "Starsky And Hutch", which is a nice twist, as this film came out at the same time in France at the afore-mentioned!) There's even a slight chuckle, when you first see the band, and one of them resembles the Gorillaz animated band!

    Contents wise: the disc's picture quality is superb, as the short length, allows for a very high bit-rate. The sound comes in DTS, Dolby Digital 5.1 or Dolby 2.0, allowing users to select their own preference. The DTS track is very good, but works best when played loud.

    The extras, are in keeping with the band and Mr Matumoto himself - slightly surreal, and sometimes unexplainable. The extras aren't labelled on-screen, but it allows a viewer to enjoy the hunt. Having said that, it would have been nice to have had labels, just to avoid the frustration of pressing endless buttons to locate what you want. I guess this is one of those selection sytems you'll either love or hate.

    The disc includes: three karaoke-style music videos, taken from the relevant film sequences; animated character profiles; a band biography; the original French trailer, and a few other bits and bobs. Not the greatest selection by any means, but fun for a short while.

    The film was released with both the DVD and CD in one package from Virgin Megastores, although this may now no longer be available. Having said that, if you can find the film or the film and CD package (which retailed at the same price), it's certainly an eclectic title for your home video collection, and one I'd recommend to music or anime fans, without a doubt.

    One final note: the film is a "PG" certificate, and isn't really suitable for the very young viewers in the house, as there are brief scenes of devil-worshiping, a man being shot at, and someone being buried on a hillside, along with mourners. It's nothing graphic, but it might be a little distressing for youngsters viewing alone!


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