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Resolutions, aspect ratios, anamorphic/non-anamorphic

Discussion in 'Plasma TVs' started by NicolasB, Jul 30, 2003.

  1. NicolasB

    NicolasB
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    There are two things that strike me as odd about plasma TV resolutions.

    1) The fact that so many are limited to 480 lines - not enough for PAL without downscaling. (But this has been discussed at some length already).

    2) The fact that the screens are 16:9 in shape, but the pixel resolutions are often 4:3 (e.g. 1024x768), so the pixels must be rectangular.

    Are there any screens that have square pixels, and at least 576 lines of vertical resolution? I know some of the 50-inch screens do - 1365x768 - but these all cost something like £6K or more, which is a heck of a step up from the £3k-£3.5K 42" screens.

    I was thinking about the second of these issues, and it occurred to me that maybe rectangular pixels might actually be a good thing when you want to display an anamorphic widescreen signal. After all, the anamorphic signal itself is actually being transmitted as a 4:3 image, and expecting the display to stretch it horizontally. By directly mapping square pixels in the (scaled) anamorphic 4:3 image to rectangular ones in the 16:9 screen, you have a neat way of doing the stretching operation.

    BUT: what happens when you want to watch non-anamorphic 4:3 material on a screen with rectangular pixels? I guess the scaler could rescale the image vertically but not horizontally, and then map to the rectangular pixels. But how good does this look? Is it the case that plasma screens with rectangular pixels do a comparatively good job with anamorphic signals, but less good with regular 4:3? And are most video scalers actually able to take a 720x576 input and rescale it to 720x768? That's not exactly a standard resolution.
     
  2. GadgetObsessed

    GadgetObsessed
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    I have wondered about scaling for 4:3 signals as well. I was trying to understand why certain screens seem much better than others at displaying Sky/Freeview 4:3 broadcasts.

    This may explain why the group demo at Nexnix came to the conclusion that the screen with 16x9 rectangular pixels (1024x1024 - Hitachi PD3000) was the best for DVD but the worst for Sky. Conversely the screen with the square pixels Panny 5 (853x480) was the worst for DVD and best for Sky.

    The lower res on the Panny also meant that detail was lost on dvd and may have meant that it did not show SKy failings as much. The Pioneer with nearly square pixels came in the middle in both tests.

    On the other hand it could have been purely related to the number of pixels (i.e. higher res better for DVD and worse for Sky) rather than their shape.
     
  3. NicolasB

    NicolasB
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    An addendum: 1024x768 is not a standard "TV" resolution, in the way that, say 720 or even 1080 lines would be. Can external video scalers do a good job of converting 720x576 to 1024x768?
     
  4. tbrar

    tbrar
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    Nicolas,

    The answer to your questions is yes. Although as with everything it depends on the quality.

    The plasma itself does this in any case, it scales everything to its native rate. The trick is to get something which does it better and by-passes the plasma scaling.

    I have recently done this with a HCPC using the HOLO3DGRAPH card (http://www.immersiveinc.com), the results were absolutely amazing feeding the HCPC Interlaced 576i sources from my Arcam.

    A quote from Rob Screene (regular contributer to the HCPC forum)who's HCPC it was;


    Tony
     
  5. Easy2BCheesy

    Easy2BCheesy
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    How much is the card as a matter of interest?
     
  6. tbrar

    tbrar
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    Easy2bCheesey,

    You can pick up the H3D1 (1st generation) for around $300 I beleive (this is what was used on my display)

    The H3DII, however, more expensive, around the $1000 without suitable Aux card.

    Tony
     
  7. NicolasB

    NicolasB
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    From where? :)
     
  8. tbrar

    tbrar
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    Go to the web site, under ditributers (European distributer for Immersive is Spatz http://www.spatz-tech.de). There are two choices for U.K.

    NB - $1000 is just a rough guess - please dont quote me on it !!!. The H3D1 cards can be bought second hand / refurb etc, look on relavent Forums.
     

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