Resolution?????

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by ched, Nov 11, 2004.

  1. ched

    ched
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    Hi to everyone. As you can see I am a newby. I have been readingthe AV forums and have found them very useful, thanks.

    I am a bit confused! :confused: As I understand it a normal 4x3 tv resolution is 720 x 576 pixels and a wide screen 16x9 is 1024 x 576 pixels.

    So far so good. Now I have been looking at projectors such as the Epson TW10H and its 854 x 480 pixels which as I understand it is US NTSC format.
    So where does the plasma screens that 1024x1024 fit in.

    It looks to me like non of the projectors/plasmas can display the actual PAL broadcast resolutions. Am I missing something somewhere or do most/all of the plasmas and projectors have to do some scaling?

    As I said I am confused :confused: :confused:
     
  2. Oakleyspatz

    Oakleyspatz
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    The resolution is not fixed to the screen aspect ratio. For example, you can have a WVGA 16:9 resolution of 854x480 and this can go up to a WXGA resolution of 1280x720 . Sony make projectors which also is classed as a 16:9 WXGA but have a resolution of 1366x768. Most VGA 4:3 ratio displays have a resolution of 800x600.

    The important thing with aspect ratios is not the resolution ( amount of pixels that make up the image) but the ratio between the two figures If you divide 1366 pixels by 16 then multiply by 9 you get the 768 pixels and so on. So as long asa the ratio between the two figures is 16:9, then you can have whatever resolution you want ( or can reach by technological limitations)
    PAL has a native resolution of 576 horizontal lines so a display that has a ratio of ?x576 will display a PAL signal unscalled likewise with NTSC which as you state , has a resolution of 480 a display with a resolution of ?x480 will display NTSC unscalled. All other resolutions must be scalled up or down to meet the native resolution of the input signal.
    There are many projectors with native PAL resolution, most tend to be DLP projectors such as the Infocus 5700 and the Optoma H57, The newer LCD models tend to go for the higher 720 lines of horizontal resolution to meet the upcoming High Definition broadcasts which Sky say they will introduce towards the end of 2005.
     
  3. mart.stokes

    mart.stokes
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    With great difficulty! You can get 1024x1024 "widescreen" plasma panels and I should imagine the processing going on inside is a real pig! :eek:

    Oakleyspatz mentions ratios and most manufacturers are sensible and stick to the math.

    Mind you, thinking about it, if you are scaling you are scaling (wasn't that a Rod Stewart hit? "we are scaling....") so does it matter that the horizontal work being done doesn't match the vertical work? I don't know! It's mostly analogue pictures we are currently feeding these things anyway. In an almost ideal world (as we will reach in the next few years) you want digital pixel to pixel mapping and that means (for hi-def) either a 720 or 1080 (depending on the standard employed) depth panel.

    I imagine the "pixels" on a 1024 by 1024 panel have to be quite elongated to take a 16:9 ratio (perhaps they are fairly close to a ratio of 16 to 9 :eek: ).

    Anyway, buy a plasma or projector today and blow your brains out in two years time when you can't achieve pixel to pixel mapping and your very expensive picture doesn't look half as good as your next door neighbour's exactly mapped 720 (perhaps) effort. Okay, perhaps you won't be able to tell the difference without "Video Essentials", but I would still think long and hard if I were you because it would nag me to death in the long run!

    720 is a sensible purchase at the moment in terms of cost and risk.
     
  4. Kahless725

    Kahless725
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    As far as I know the 1024x1024 plasma panels are called ALIS and really only have a res of 1024x512 with trickery becomes 1024x1024.
     
  5. inzaman

    inzaman
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    Wow that is some trickery being able to split each pixel :D
     
  6. LV426

    LV426
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    All pixel-based devices (DLP, LCD, Plasma) have to re-scale the incoming image to display it on the fixed array of pixels available, unless it just happens to match. And it just happens to match (vertically at least) on a ???x 480 panel for NTSC, and a ??? x 576 panel for PAL.

    Scaling can happen two ways - up (towards more pixels) and down (less).

    Upscaling will produce a better result than downscaling.
    No scaling will produce a better result than down scaling.

    As to whether no scaling is better than upscaling - opinions are divided. Done well, upscaling does subjectively improve the image. It's just that it isn't always done well.
     
  7. mart.stokes

    mart.stokes
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    You are correct, it is VERY subjective. One side will always argue (as would any audiophiles if this was done to sound) that upscaling (in relation to digital sources) inserts stuff that isn't really there, it guesses. The picture may (possibly) LOOK better, but it does not reflect the original :eek:

    Of course low res sources can easily be improved, so they look better, by good scaling.
     
  8. ched

    ched
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    Thanks to everyone for their replies. It all makes sence now. Basically I should go for the best resolution I can afford :thumbsup:

    Thanks.
     
  9. MikeK

    MikeK
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    Not necessarily - there's a lot more to it than just the resolution of the display panel!

    For a projector, there's the quality of the optics, throw ratio, input flexibility, deinterlacing quality, scaling quality, other video processing features, colour rendition, greyscale reproduction, cost of spares, what warranty you get, brightness, contrast ratio, signal compatibility, colour wheel type (DLP) ......plus no doubt a few other things which don't spring off the top of the head at the mo'. :) :)

    I suppose it's a bit like digital cameras - a model with 5 megapixels won't necessarily produce better pictures than a 3 megapixel one - it might, but resolution alone won't guarantee it!
     
  10. ched

    ched
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    Thanks for your additionl points. Basically same as normal with hifi stuff Get a demo and see what I like. Thanks. I have a Marantz projector at the moment, it is very old and dim but I love watching the big picture. I guess I will have to try and get a demo of some new kit.
    Thanks for all your advice.
     

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