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Resolution & DPI : help!

Discussion in 'Photography Forums' started by AOD, Jul 11, 2003.

  1. AOD

    AOD
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    When printing pictures via an online service such as Boots or Jessops, is there a particular dpi that I should be aiming for?

    I recall reading somewhere that 75 dpi was a "magic number", but then I also recall seeing 300 dpi being mentioned as well.

    I guess my questions are:

    What kind of printing technology do these online printers use, are we talking dye sub or something else?
    What dpi do these printers operate at? A related question to this (I guess) is what resolutions would be good for a given print size (eg 6 x 4, 7 x 5, 10 x 8).

    Please feel free to point me at an appropriate FAQ if there is one.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Matt F

    Matt F
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    The magic number is 300dpi as that is the publishing standard. In practice you'd be pushed to spot the difference between 300dpi and 250 dpi - even 200dpi is pretty good.

    When you go below this however quality drops off. 75dpi looks fine on a PC screen but not very good at all printed off.

    The resolution per print size doesn't change - the same rules apply regardless of the size of the print - the difference is that you need a lot more pixels overall for a 300dpi 8X6 print than you do for a 300dpi 6X4 print.

    I'm not sure what resolution these pro printers achieve but I would have thought they have got to be pretty good. I would also imagine that Boots/Jessops will specify what resolution your images should be at to get maximum quality.

    Hope this helps.

    Matt.
     

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