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Replacing the metal 'bridge' that connects the two L and R inputs on a speaker?

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Speakers' started by Ian Vinten, Jun 6, 2005.

  1. Ian Vinten

    Ian Vinten
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    Just bought some Kef Q1 speakers off eBay. The speakers themselves are in fantastic condition but are missing the strip of metal that connects the two red and black inputs on the back of each speaker (is there a technical term for these?).

    I've bought banana plugs so won't be able to split the cable to make the two connections to both inputs on each channel.

    Can you buy these strips in the shops?

    Are they specific to each model of speaker?

    Will a section of speaker cable connecting the two inputs suffice?
     
  2. hornydragon

    hornydragon
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    these strips cripple the speakers use a short length of speaker cable to bridge the 2 sets of posts
     
  3. Ian Vinten

    Ian Vinten
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    So I should replace the strips on my Q3s too?
     
  4. hornydragon

    hornydragon
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    YES, use quality speaker cable (same as your main cable)
     
  5. Reiner

    Reiner
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    I think they are specific (in terms of length and shape) and you would have to source them from the manufacturer.
    Alternatively, as already suggested, use a short length of speaker cable.
     
  6. philthyanimal

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    I lost one of mine while cleaning, phoned kef asked them for some, they arrived a day later, free of charge
     
  7. Ambient Fish

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    Look on the Russ Andrews web site, they do 4TC jumper leads cut to length with Banana plugs at one end and bare wire at the other, these are a huge improvement over the "metal bars" supplied with the KEFs.
     
  8. skinnyfat

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    Hi there

    What you really should do is bi-wire these babies. First thing I did when mine arrived was take those flimsy plates off and tossed them in the bin. These kefs love being bi-wired as do all bi-wireable speakers. The fact that they did not come with the bridge plates tells you that the previous owner must've felt the same :)

    Skinny
     
  9. Harry T2

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    I don't agree. Bi-wiring has had little to no benefit to me.
     
  10. skinnyfat

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    Sorry to hear that, again It was just my opinion but I had a noticable difference when I switched to bi-wire. Maybe the kefs benefit more from it. Perhaps I should have said 'as do a lot of bi-wireable speakers' .

    Skinny
     
  11. hornydragon

    hornydragon
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    B&W 60X series sound worse Bi-wired :confused: :confused: :confused:
    However unless you are Bi-AMping them doubling up your speaker cable does just double the cost of your speaker cable!!! the best bet is to use quality cable to bridge the connections or replace the binding posts and feed the X-over direct.............. give it a try skinnyfat seem what you think 4-6" of cable is normally plenty if a tad fiddley get back and let us know what you think
     
  12. ukaudiophile

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    Hi,

    I fully agree, I've had at least 10 pairs of speakers in my listen ing room over the last 18 months, and every one which had these loathsome bridging strips sounded much better with these strips removed and bi wired. There is no doubt in my mind that bi-wiring does give a significant improvement in sound quality, and whilst doubling up the amount of cable running between the amps and speakers is generally considered to be advantageous, a further reason why removing these strips gives such an advantage has recently been brought to my attention by a cable design company. They have suggested that the actual mechanical noise from each driver is being conducted between the binding posts and onto the drivers. Whilst I am a little suspicious about this, a brief demonstration using a stethescope was truly shocking to me at the amount of noise actually being conducted through these binding posts.

    Best wishes,

    Dave
     
  13. Slimchandi

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    So if I've got these bridging strips on, it's best to replace them with a small length of speaker wire if I can't biwire?
     
  14. Londondecca

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    If you compare the levels of vibration inside a speaker cabinet to the transmitted noise via the binding posts, the binding posts issue will be negligible. Moving the crossover outside the cabinet might yield some benefits by a reduction in mechanical and electromagnetic interference
     
  15. hornydragon

    hornydragon
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    yes mate dead easy
     
  16. Slimchandi

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    And so it was. Haven't given it a proper testing yet, might be a lot of fiddling to keep swapping between the two. I'm surprised I didn't consider it before really.
     
  17. skinnyfat

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    Horny

    Gave it a shot and this is my opinion only !!

    Since I didn't have the original bridge plates to put back, I went looking through my tool box for some good old 'lamp cord' (which I felt would as close as possible replicate the plates) and lo and behold there was a pair of plates there which I assumed came from my centre.

    I then brought my Q1's to the front (seeing as the Q1's are the speakers in question in the original post). I bi-wired the left and bridge plated the right. Whacked on 'No Doubt - Underneath it all' , amp on stereo bypass. Wife said only "NOT AGAIN :nono: "

    Not bad but not great by any stretch of the imagination. As the track played I did feel that the sound imaging was off balance, the vocals just didnt seem to come from the pseudo centre which I am used to with these speakers.

    Right, ripped off the bridge plate and replaced with a 4 inch piece of my speaker wire (thought if this doesnt work I'm sending Horny the bill :D ). Definate improvement, Vocals better and the bass tightned up, felt as though the speakers were 'breathing' easier.

    Finally, both bi-wired and I'm back in audio heaven, perfect balance and all detail there where it should be with a very tightly controlled sound that I enjoy from the kef range.

    My conclusion is basically this........

    Whether or not you want to spend the money on bi-wiring I would still recommend you rip those bridge plates off and replace. Replace either with a short length of the speaker wire you are using (in my case QED silver edition which HornyDragon now owes me 4 inches :rotfl: ) or bi-wire. Either way you should notice a difference. That said, I have read in a few articles that Kefs benefit a lot from bi-wiring ( I agree). My assumtion would then be some brands benefit more than others and its up to the owners to decide.

    Again this is just my humble test and opinions.
     
  18. skinnyfat

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  19. ukaudiophile

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    Hi,

    You're absolutely correct, common sense and logic would indicate that is the case, but I've actually tried out a specific bridging unit which is designed to deal with this problem. Now this unit is expensive, and is designed to be used on pretty high end speakers (think £2K +) specifically because of the cabinet resonance problem, but even at that level there is a finite level of vibrational breakthrough, yet, damn it, if these things don't make a noticeable difference every time. I would love to know the physics behind this, but as this is a 'Patent Applied For' device, the contents of the box are sealed, and the precise mechanism behind it's operation are very hush hush, and will be until the result of the patent app comes through, but there is no doubt that there is something going on here. The theory is apparently well known, but this is the first time someone has managed to figure out how to deal with this.

    You may well see some coverage of this in the audio press in the not too distant future.

    Best wishes,

    Dave
     

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