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Replacing Fence Posts

nheather

Distinguished Member
Question about replacing fence posts.

I'm going to get a tradesman in to do the two fences but often I've considered replacing a single post or perhaps the whole fence myself.

But one of the things that has always stopped me is being puzzled how you would replace a fence post.

Here's my thinking.

It is concreted in. This presents two problems - breaking down the concrete and getting it out.

Now when the post was originally set you dig a hole much wider than the post, you set the post it and fill the surround with concrete.

If you take it out you will have an even bigger hole. It's no good putting the earth back in to make it smaller because it will be loose.

So do you end up just having to fill and even bigger hole with concrete?

Or is there a clever way that I'm missing?

Cheers,

Nigel
 

Phil57

Well-known Member
Question about replacing fence posts.

I'm going to get a tradesman in to do the two fences but often I've considered replacing a single post or perhaps the whole fence myself.

But one of the things that has always stopped me is being puzzled how you would replace a fence post.

Here's my thinking.

It is concreted in. This presents two problems - breaking down the concrete and getting it out.

Now when the post was originally set you dig a hole much wider than the post, you set the post it and fill the surround with concrete.

If you take it out you will have an even bigger hole. It's no good putting the earth back in to make it smaller because it will be loose.

So do you end up just having to fill and even bigger hole with concrete?

Or is there a clever way that I'm missing?

Cheers,

Nigel

Reduce the length of one fence panel (are you using panels?) therefore the posts will need to be in different spots, easy.
 

paulyoung666

Distinguished Member
dig out the old post , then drive a metpost spike into new concrete in the old posthole , does that make sense ? ......
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
Reduce the length of one fence panel (are you using panels?) therefore the posts will need to be in different spots, easy.

Yes, that is one way I had considered.

dig out the old post , then drive a metpost spike into new concrete in the old posthole , does that make sense ? ......

That doesn't really answer my confusion. The trouble I have visualising, is that if you remove the concrete you are going to be left with a hole that is much bigger than the original install. This means that you will need (i) a lot more concrete and (ii) it may not be as stable in the ground.

I understand the benefit of the metpost for when it comes to replace it in the future but don't see how it helps me now.

Cheers,

Nigel
 

paulyoung666

Distinguished Member
Yes, that is one way I had considered.



That doesn't really answer my confusion. The trouble I have visualising, is that if you remove the concrete you are going to be left with a hole that is much bigger than the original install. This means that you will need (i) a lot more concrete and (ii) it may not be as stable in the ground.

I understand the benefit of the metpost for when it comes to replace it in the future but don't see how it helps me now.

Cheers,

Nigel

if the concrete is sound , dig out the wood from the concrete then fit a metpost into the old hole with new concrete , does that make sense ? .....
 

logiciel

Moderator
Sure does.:thumbsup:;)
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
if the concrete is sound , dig out the wood from the concrete then fit a metpost into the old hole with new concrete , does that make sense ? .....

Yes it does. When you said new concrete in your first post I meant you meant replacing the old with new concrete.

Is there an easy way to dig the old wood out of the concrete? I'm guessing there could be 2 ft of it.

Cheers,

Nigel
 

qwakuk

Active Member
dig out the old post , then drive a metpost spike into new concrete in the old posthole , does that make sense ? ......

Did this a month or so ago. Took a while to get the old post out. Spike in the ground, post into the spike and some concrete to hold it all in place.
 

RBZ5416

Distinguished Member
When I did one I manage to remove the remains of the old post intact by driving a large coach screw into it & using that to crowbar it out in one piece. The new post dropped straight into the square hole.
 

Chadford

Distinguished Member
Have replaced most of my rotten posts with new ones by driving Metposts into the old concrete. Managed to remove most of the old rotten wood by drilling chiselling etc...

I found this method works but it's pretty hard to get the Metposts to stay vertical as you smash through the old concrete, they also have a tendency twist a bit which is not ideal. I think the success of this method will probably be determined by the composition of the concrete (how hard it is, how much rubble has been added, etc..).

I'd try one out and see how it goes.

:)
 

ldoodle

Distinguished Member
What I did when I done mine, is dig out the concrete and relay a base layer about 2" deep, then fixed these into the base layer and then cemented around the whole metpost, lining the inside to avoid concrete getting in.

The met post is sunk completely so the top of it is flush with the concrete, which is sunk 2" below ground level (as I turfed it).

Then just dropped the post in, unfixed. At least that way I can just pull the posts out when the time comes. At least this way you don't see any concrete/metposts (as it was when I bought the house!!!).
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
Have you considered putting in concrete posts in so you don't have to do it again?

I have a quote for that and for concrete gravel boards.

I'm torn between the undeniable functional goodness and ugliness (to me).

Cheers,

Nigel
 

jenam93

Well-known Member
Had that same dilemma about 10 years ago. Went for concrete posts and have not regretted it at all. They are a bit stark when first in place but as soon as you start growing stuff it is easy to forget about them completely.

The thing I do regret is not having the concrete gravel boards put in place due to expense. There are a number of panels that are rotting at ground level.

Mind you, they have been on the earth for almost a decade so they have done well really.
 

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