Replacement for Sky Q Router - Needs to have good wifi coverage

MV Owner

Standard Member
Hi All,

I have a Sky Q Router with Sky Q 2TB TV and Sky Q TV multiroom

I have experienced trouble with obtaining a reliable wifi signal in my outside garage. I have tried using TP-Link homeplugs and these have been unreliable also have been so called wifi extenders.

I would appreciate thoughts on a decent quality brand of router that could replace the Sky Q Router and still work with all my Sky Q products.

Kind regards





MV
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
IMHO - trying to find some magic "much better router" is a waste of money. What differences there are, aren't worth spending money on if you are trying to improve Wi-Fi signalling.

Wi-Fi transmit power is limited by law and most kit is, and always has been, at or very close to the permitted max.

Wi-Fi is a two way radio "conversation" like walkie-talkies, not a one way radio "lecture" like television. Any "fix" to the router-->client transmissions would need to be matched with a reciprocal "fix" for the router<--client transmissions. (Think of it like sound.) Though more directional antenna can help, it's a bit of double edged sword in that it can introduce as many new problems as it fixes.

By far the best way to "fix" Wi-FI overage issues is to get out the drills and install some proper cabled ethenet backhaul links between the various hotspots.

If you have already tried the alternatives (Powerline and Wi-Fi repeaters AKA "extenders") and they aren't working for you, then proper cabled ethernet backhaul links would be a far better use of your time and money that looking for "magic" routers.

Certainly, some routers do better than others using some of the latest tricks, but the improvements are often not as dramatic as you might think. They could even be worse - it's a complete gamble.
 
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MV Owner

Standard Member
Many thanks mickevh, When you mention ethernet backhaul links are you effectively talking about a wired connection from my router to the area proving problematic?
 

rs6mra

Active Member
Many thanks mickevh, When you mention ethernet backhaul links are you effectively talking about a wired connection from my router to the area proving problematic?
That is pretty much what he is saying. Ideally what you want to do is try to have a wired connection wherever and whenever you can.
 
Yes - Additional WIFI access points with a wire connection back to the router in the areas you have poor signal in.

And its worth considering actually wire devices that can be wired to remove them from using WIFI completely. I have a number of 8 port switches wired around my house so that all the PC's are wired, along with the Firesticks and media stuff. Only Phones , Tablets, Alexa's and Sonos use WIFI as they have too.
 

MV Owner

Standard Member
Thanks for this advice and I am going to look into going wired for items that can run with a wired input. If I have an item that is wireless only, what sort of product do I require that takes a wired cable from my router and then turns it into a wireless output??
 

rs6mra

Active Member
Ideally what you want to do is create access points that would improve your wifi.
This can be done by repurposing an old router as an access point. You should ideally set this up where you have dead spots on the property.
There is a sticky on my main page here titled connecting two routers. Have a read through it and it will be even clearer.
For instance, if the wifi strength is poor in the garage and you want to improve this for phones, tablets and the likes, you can run a cable to the garage and connect the re-purposed router there and then connect the Sky mini box to the very same router which would be acting as a switch.
 
something like this - I dont have one of these so I am not recommending it particularly.

Amazon product
You can spend more but something in this level is usually fine, Its worth looking for access points that mention POE (like this one does) which is Power Over Ethernet. this means that the network (or Ethernet) cable also provides the power so you dont need to be next to a plug socket, it just needs the ethernet cable with connects back to your router attached to it.

Basically a network cable and an adapter which comes with this router are coneccted at the router end and the other end goes into this device which you mount in or near to your dead spot.

You could also consider a Mesh Wifi system, which is more expensive wireless way of achiving the same kind of outcome. basically 2 or more wifi access points the connect to each other with a dedicated wifi back haul. Sometimes this is not a good idea as you still need decent wifi between them and as thats the issue its often not a good solution
 
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rs6mra

Active Member
You can spend more but something in this level is usually fine, Its worth looking for access points that mention POE (like this one does) which is Power Over Ethernet. this means that the network (or Ethernet) cable also provides the power so you dont need to be next to a plug socket, it just needs the ethernet cable with connects back to your router attached to it.
The router on its own will not power the ethernet cable but I stand to be corrected.
If going down this route you will have to use a POE injector/adapter which can be located where the router is.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
Thanks for this advice and I am going to look into going wired for items that can run with a wired input. If I have an item that is wireless only, what sort of product do I require that takes a wired cable from my router and then turns it into a wireless output??

The (pedantic) term is "Access Point (AP)" or "Wi-Fi Access Point (WAP.)"

Technically, all Wi-Fi hotspots are availed by AP's. However, AP's get built-in to lots of other devices such as SOHO routers, Powerline/HomePlugs, Mi-Fi's, ever smartphones and PC's can be turned into AP's with the correct software. But you can buy AP's as stand alone devices also.

There's a lot of variety in the feature set of AP's (with prices to match.) But for a basic one to service only a few devices, mostly it's about looking for the protocol support (A/B/G/N/AC/AX) you require, speeds, and so on. Most are "dual band" these days, but it's worth checking. I agree, POE power is worthwhile especially if you want to ceiling mount or some such where aesthetics (and cable routing) is a consideration, meaning you only need to run one data cable line to the AP instead of separate data and power.

Most SOHO router don't supply the POE power. So as stated, you either need a POE injector or a POE switch. Some AP's that run POE come with the POE injector supplied (I haven't checked the one FEMan_2000 links,) but again it's something the check in the specifications.
 
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MV Owner

Standard Member
Many thanks all for your expertise which I will consider of course. I need to start another thread about a powerline adapter but thanks for all the help above
 

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