Rental DVDs

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by Piers, Mar 25, 2006.

  1. Piers

    Piers
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    I am lucky enough to have an Arcam DV79 and a Snazio Net Cinema 1350. The Arcam is big money, the Snazio a remarkable £220 or so. I only occasionally rent DVDs from Blockbuster but yet again tonight the rental DVD (Crash) refused to play on the Arcam but played, just, with stutters, on the Snazio.

    I am not knocking the Arcam - I know that given a decent copy of a DVD it will produce a picture that will knock spots off the the same DVD in the Snazio - what is going on with a rental DVD, covered in scratches etc? Why does the Snazio play it and the Arcam just says "no".

    Any thoughts?
     
  2. Crustyloafer

    Crustyloafer
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    This is quite common. It is possible with the Arcam trying to extract every last ounce of information off the disc it is a lot more sensitive to poor condition discs. As a retailer of a range of high end DVD players inluding the Arcam machines I have found this to be a fairly common trait amongst most high end players.
     
  3. leedebs

    leedebs
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    Seems to be the norm this tbh.
    A friend of mine has a top of the range Sony (quite old now tbh) but plays most dvd's with applomb BUT not all, seems to be stuttery with rental discs & copies.
    Yet he has a £30 supermarket jobbie in the bedtroom that plays absolutely everything & now he has found that by swopping out the Sony for the cheapo even the picture on the cheapie is very good........he said it begs the question why pay more than £30 for a dvd player? :eek:
    I just find it really anoying that I have a respectable dvd player that isn't cheap that plays most discs but not all & yet a cheapo player seems to play absolutely everything, sorry not an answer to your question, just my thoughts.
     
  4. nwgarratt

    nwgarratt
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    It is probably something to do with the cheap dvd players having a DVD ROM drive. They do seem to play everything to start with. A £30 DVD player is fine for most people but, just don't expect it to last more than a year (which is fine considering the price). I have had four cheap players from £20 to £50 and now they all don't work 100%. Some stutter on alll DVD and some won't even recognise a DVD now. However, my Sony NS900 which is about four years old plays eveything and is still my number one DVD player. It has a really decent drive mechanism.
     
  5. AndyC_772

    AndyC_772
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    It's something I find a major irritation, and I honestly don't understand it. My Denon 2900, despite it's tank-like build and special 'anti-vibration protein paint', shakes violently from side to side with a few of my discs and won't play them.

    My Panasonic DMR-ES10 still shakes, but plays everything OK.

    The NEC DVD-RW drive in my PC, which costs much less than either and has to spin the disc much faster too, is silent, vibration free and unfussy.

    What gives?
     
  6. leedebs

    leedebs
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    Yep dvd drives fitted in PC's seem to play everything..........why don't the Major Brands fit them into their players though?
    I have tried Sony, Toshiba, just taken back a Panasonic S29 & have a Yamaha SL100 that is still fussy sometimes:rolleyes:
    All makes & yet the cheap (£89) Goodmans tv/dvd combi in me daughters bedroom plays ALL discs.....even region1......aargh
     
  7. Piers

    Piers
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    Thanks for the replies. Glad to hear that I am not alone and to add to my original post I had exactly the same problem with a Denon 3910 - rental DVDs frequently refused to play (confirming what Crustyloafer said). Blockbuster is a 15 minute drive and if a rental DVD refuses to play it is tempting to use the Snazio rather than try for another copy!

    I am still trying to work out why? The Snazio has a CD-ROM drive whereas the Arcam has a DVD drive. Sure, the Arcam is attempting to extract more information off the disc than the Snazio to give the better PQ that the Arcam is capable of displaying.

    A disc covered in scratches presumably taxes the players' error correction logic - does this increase substantially when the player is "high end" and is digging far more info off the disc?
     
  8. AndyC_772

    AndyC_772
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    The whole 'digging more information off the disc' idea is a misnomer; either a player successfully reads the MPEG bit stream off the DVD or it fails. Miss out any bits from an MPEG stream and the picture freezes, macroblocks become visible, the sound drops out and so on.

    The difference in a high-end player may be that the quality of the video DAC is higher, or it may apply more accurate and sophisticated video processing during the decode process, but it still starts with exactly the same data. An expensive player doesn't somehow look harder and find more data bits on the disc than a cheap one - bits that contain fine details about the picture and sound, but without which it's still possible to play the movie albeit in reduced quality. It just doesn't work that way.

    I suspect it's all down to product development time, engineering resources and expertise. If you're making cheap DVD players, margins are tight and you simply can't afford to have many of them returned as faulty. So, you make very sure you get disc compatibility sorted, and picture & sound quality (which people won't have had the opportunity to assess before buying) become a low priority.

    Make high-end players, though, and your engineering team needs expertise in making the best audio and video circuits possible, so the player gets good reviews and beats the competition. Chances are that the transport is a bought-in component, and the expertise to get the best possible disc compatibility probably just isn't there.
     

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