Removing 1 x radiator (whilst the wall is plastered), then reinstall

figoagogo

Distinguished Member
Sorry if this is a stupid question, but can I quite easlily remove a radiator from a wall so that a plasterer can replaster.

In simple terms the radiator needs shutting off and removing, but keeping the rest of my C/H working? Then I may be putting it back, or may employ someone to supply and vertical unit.

Its modern C/H with a Bosch Combi boiler, the Rads have thermostats on them, I am guessing I need to some how close of the flow with a spanner/isolation lock?

If one rad is removed, and there is no join to the pipes how does the rest of the C/H work? (call me thick!)

DIY is not my strongest point ;)
 

DavidMac

Well-known Member
Shut off both valves either side of the Rad, then you can crack the nuts joining the rads to the valves, have something underneath as the radiator will drain, Lift the rad off the wall bracket and tilt forward. You can leave it like that whilst the plastering gets done or remove the radiator fully with both valves turned off. The CH will still work.
 

kav

Distinguished Member
Most people will need to drain down their central heating as it takes the normally high water pressure out of the pipes and keeps the mess to a minimum (I know one person who can isolate each rad without draining the system down, but most of us don't have that luxury). Your heating won't work when there is no pressure in the system. Somewhere around your house (mine is outside under the front window) will be a little drain valve you can open to drain your central heating system. Once that's done, get an old towel, and use a spanner to loosen the nuts holding the pipes on either end of your radiator.

Once the pipes are no longer connected, the radiator should lift off fairly easily (you might need help, depending on how big it is). There will probably be some very dirty water dripping from the radiator, hence the towel. Once the radiator is off, you will probably want to unscrew the mounts so the plasterer can get in - before you do that mark the location of the mounts so you can easily replace them.

Make sure it's just a skim coat - too thick and (depending on how much play is in your pipes) you might not get the pipes to line up with your radiator again. That would be unfortunate.

Do all the above in reverse to get it back in place, and refill your system, making sure to bleed each radiator to remove airlocks.
 
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DavidMac

Well-known Member
If you shut off both valves either side of the radiator that particular radiator will be isolated from the system and can be removed. The CH will still work.
 

blue max

Distinguished Member
If you may have a different unit installed, I'd get it all ready beforehand. You may want the supply pipes coming out of the walls instead. The supply pipes should spur off the main run, so by taking a radiator off, you don't break the circuit.
 

figoagogo

Distinguished Member
Thanks, it seems removal is easy, but getting it working again may not be as straightforward.

I may call a plumber, as if we are putting in a new rad, I want it done properly.
 

kav

Distinguished Member
If you shut off both valves either side of the radiator that particular radiator will be isolated from the system and can be removed. The CH will still work.

True, I was thinking of actually moving the radiator - had to do this for two in my house last weekend. Of course if you're just putting the radiator back in the same place you can isolate it without impacting the rest. :confused:

@mattrixdesign2 it's really not difficult to do, ignore my details as that applies more to moving radiators which isn't relevant for you.
 

figoagogo

Distinguished Member
Oh I see. Thanks for confirming Kav.
 

Ste7en

Distinguished Member
It is fairly straightforward, we took all of ours off (individually) and wire wooled them and sprayed them a few years ago. They look brand new now. If you aren't too good at DIY you may get air locks. In which case possibly get someone in to take it off for you, it should only take 10 - 20 minutes.
 

Pisto_Grih

Distinguished Member
yeah, just close both valves, unscrew one nut and open the bleed valve at the top (to let air in) and let water dribble out, plenty of towels etc. Radiators can be heavy esp when full, so be careful not to damage inlet pipes. Lift very carefully off one side of the support and pour out the sludge. When it's close to being empty, unscrew the other nut and remove.

I've done this recently in two rooms, I removed the radiator wall mounts but left the screws sticking out of the wall so that the position would be exactly the same, and put some plastic bags over the ends of the pipes so that plaster wouldn't block the threads when screwing them back on.
 

its_all_Greek

Distinguished Member
I would suggest making a couple of Blanks to connect back into the pipes that go to the Radiator after you have removed it nowt worse than waking up the next morning to find the isolation valve passes a little.
Especially if you have a TRV on one end.
 

Wahreo

Distinguished Member
I don'y think I've drained down a system in over a year and have altered the pipe work to over 20 Towel Radiators.

What's wrong with your Radiator now, matrix?
 

WeegyAVLover

Distinguished Member
Guys this is an interesting thing. I have always taken radiators off and completely drained the system, but that is because I am still learning and an idiot.

When you say turn both valves off can I clarify:
1) The TRV do you just set that to "0" and that is it set to off or closed?
2) at the other side that is just a cap - do you remove the cap and tighten the valve on that side and that is that off or closed?

Is it seriously that simple? If it is I am a muppet but good to know for the other 8 rooms I have to do in the house.

Col
 

kav

Distinguished Member
^yes that's pretty much it. After closing the valves just make sure you loosen the nut on the radiator side of the valve, not the pipe side. ;)
 

Wahreo

Distinguished Member
The 'lock shield' end needs turning with a spanner but the TRV can be shut by closing but beware!!.......it has already been mentioned in this thread but I will say it again- some thermostatic valves can be shut off but if the room temperature drops below a certain temperature then the valve will open on its own.

Best thing to do is cap off the valve itself (leaving the valve in position) by simply installing a 1/2" cap or 15mm nut and olive, a small piece of pipe and a push fit cap.

Remember, when undoing the 'Union' nut on a radiator valve, special care should be taken to hold the valve body either with a spanner, pair of grips or Stilsons slotted at a right angle to the body. Failure to hold the valve properly, coupled with a stubborn union nut, may cause a leak on the nut and olive or worse still, an end feed joint.
 

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