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Reflective paint

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by smallangryboy, May 8, 2003.

  1. smallangryboy

    smallangryboy
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    Anyone know if there are any paint products that can be used to create a reflective screen for an LCD projector, and if so where can they be found ?

    So instead of using a roll down screen, one wall of the room is painted to project an image onto.
     
  2. gothmog

    gothmog
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    Here you goo.

    Others have great success with regular Dulux Icestorm paint :)

    -- Jon
     
  3. stevelup

    stevelup
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    Are you sure you want a reflective screen for an LCD projector. High gain screens often get worse hot-spotting and accentuate the poor C/R of most LCD projectors. They are also affected more by ambient light.

    You probably just want a light grey screen (Dulux Icestorm 5 or 6)

    Regards,

    Steve
     
  4. Kase

    Kase
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    A reflective paint, rather than something like silk vinyl, will have tiny flakes of aluminium in it, which cause the sparkly effect when you paint them on. However, the flakes will align in random directions and simply create 'snow' on your picture with thousands of tiny hot spots, unlike a proper reflective screen which I believe uses tiny beads that act similar to cats eyes, by reflecting the light all in the same direction (i.e. back at the viewer) rather than scattering it all over the place.
     
  5. Anders_UK

    Anders_UK
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    Don't get too hung up on all the marketing crap that goes with screens. You won't be able to tell the difference a great deal anyway - unless it is really badly done.

    A normal matt paint - with a hint of grey to improve contrast will be fine.
     
  6. Gary Lightfoot

    Gary Lightfoot
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    Or maybe white blackout cloth stretched over a frame. That's what I used for over two years until I needed some extra gain.

    The blackout cloth is around £5 (or less) per linear meter, and a frame will cost just a few quid for the wood.

    Be carefull with the paint - too refelctive will give a hotspot in the middle.

    If it has to be paint, I'll second the Icestorm 5 or 6 vote though. :)

    Gary
     
  7. Fjorko

    Fjorko
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    Where does one get blackout cloth ?
     
  8. Gary Lightfoot

    Gary Lightfoot
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    You can get blackout cloth from most good curtain shops or haberdashers (sp?).

    There are various colours it seems, but look for the whitest one. It'll be a white cloth on one side, and a white or off-white vinyl on the other.

    It's used to hang behind curtains to act as a light block.

    Gary.
     
  9. fazer600

    fazer600
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    Or pop into Ikea and pick up a white blackout blind for £20 200cm x 195 cm. Works brilliantly with my AE100.
     
  10. xander

    xander
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    I've had very good results with Silk and Satin interior water based paints (gives a nice bright picture, better than on flat paint, imo). I've settled on Dulux 474 (they don't know about Ice Storm down under) after experimenting with a few colors. The biggest problem however is to apply the paint with an even sheen. Spraying is the best but causes too much of a mess if you have to paint this in-situ. I've purchased Dulux semi-gloss this week, together with Floetrol (spelling?) to help in the smooth application. I will be rolling it on.
     

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