Red Wine!

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Soundburst, Jan 9, 2012.

  1. Soundburst

    Soundburst
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    Anyone on here a red wine lover?

    I've been trying to get into it for ages now. Still pretty much only drink cocktails when I'm out ; or kopperberg.

    I'm looking some light reds to start me off as all the ones I've had have been very strong and dark and a bit off putting.

    I'm off on holiday this week so I just bought three reds to try out randomly and I'm hoping one of them is nice haha.

    Not saying I want Ribena tasting red wine ...but one that's "accessible" for me to gradually acquire the taste.

    Anyone got any suggestions? :)
     
  2. Hitby

    Hitby
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    Have you tried any whites? They're much more palatable if you're not a wine drinker. If you're dead set on reds ask in the off license for anything that's tannin free/virtually tannin free. They're also easier to drink imho.

    Personally I love a good Tempranillo but that is quite an intense purple wine

    hth
     
  3. nonumb

    nonumb
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    Try a colder climate wine such as a burgundy or a beaujolais (asda extra special fleurie is £5) these tend to be lighter than most. I'd avoid rioja for the time being.

    For very easy (but not for real wine lovers) you might want to start on the cheap californian or aussie wines such as gallo. I dont like them but they are a bit like ribena so may be a way in for you. Perhaps some New Zealand wines may be another place to look. Depends on your budget also.

    If you've got an independent wine shop near you go in and see them they'll usually sort you out. I really miss my local wine shop now that I've moved cities!
     
  4. craig1912

    craig1912
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    Cotes de Rhone is fairly light. Stay away from most of the Australian Reds as they tend to be heavier
     
  5. nonumb

    nonumb
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    Tempranillo I'd say is not a great grape to start on if you're just getting into wine. Its the grape in Rioja and as you say is quite intense, although there are some quite smooth examples out there but then you're looking at quite a lot of money.

    I'm a massive fan of pinot noir and its not too strong a taste might be a good place to start. Can produce a red which is extremely light.
     
  6. nheather

    nheather
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    I find the easiest way to get into Reds is to drink it with food.

    I don't get too hung up with the right colour for the right dish - I think it is just best that people drink what they prefer.

    But in my opinion reds go very well with food, whites do aswell, but if drinking without food I find whites much easier as they are more refreshing and colder!

    Cheers,

    Nigel
     
  7. Steven

    Steven
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    Try fruitier lighter wines intended to be drank on their own or with appetisers, rather than fuller bodied ones to be drank with raw red meat. Though feel free to dive in if you wish. Nigel's observations are good too
     
  8. Soundburst

    Soundburst
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    I bought this as a gift for one of my friends before christmas as the description did sound pretty tasty - I'll try it myself now thanks :)

    Colder climate = lighter wines. I didn't know that, thanks. That's a good tip for me to look out for. . .I actually bought a small bottle of Gallo this evening which I'm going to try out tomorrow. :) Budget really doesn't bother me as I'm trying to find a decent wine so willing to try out some good ones if it means I'll have something to enjoy.

    I've tried a lot of white and I just don't get on with them so I'm keen to get into Red wine. Interesting tannin free points there. Not sure what that means but it definitely sounds like it'll be something that'll help me ease myself into the wines.

    ------

    I bought a few small tasters tonight:

    Simply Sangiorese Rubicone which is "lively redcurrant and spice from Italy"
    J.P Chenet Merlot which is "fruity and round"
    Gallo Family Cabernet Sauvignon which is from California (no numb has suggested that so it might be the first one I try tomorrow).

    In the past I've found that the descriptions don't really mean anything :laugh:

    Looking up some wine tasting classes to go to with a couple of friends too.

    Thanks for all the tips.
     
  9. shahedz

    shahedz
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    I don't like strong reds, I was told to try a pinot noir as they're quite light and I really enjoyed that.
     
  10. Soundburst

    Soundburst
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    ooOoo. Thanks for this.
     
  11. Dony

    Dony
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    Don't be afraid to stick a red wine in the fridge. We've always been told to serve red wine at room temperature, but that rule of thumb has been in existence since before central heating.

    My personal favourite is Nuits St George (Pinot Noir), but for something lighter, a chilled Fleurie is hard to beat.

    Once you get the flavour, make sure to try out a good St Emillion
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2012
  12. Soundburst

    Soundburst
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    Never thought about sticking them in the fridge. Will do that tonight in preparation for lunch tomorrow :D

    Will also check out Fleurie :)
     
  13. Dony

    Dony
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    Don't leave it in there too long......here's a guide to give you an idea.

    Best temperature to serve wine
     
  14. Soundburst

    Soundburst
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    Oh I see! Thanks for that. . .was about to stick it in overnight :D

    Beaujolais Nouveau also seems to be a tasty light red wine. . .have you had a taste of it?
     
  15. Dony

    Dony
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    Yes, but not this years vintage so no idea how it compares to previous years. Generally speaking it's a very easy drinking wine, though I remember one year and it was only good for putting on chips.
     
  16. Soundburst

    Soundburst
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    Oh dear. Well you haven't sold that one to me :laugh:
     
  17. Dony

    Dony
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    It's a very young wine which is meant to be an indicator of the season (for Beaujolais wines, not all French wine).
    Served chilled and it's not bad, but don't use it as an indicator for French wines as it's really quite unique in that it's meant to be drank immediately.
     
  18. Soundburst

    Soundburst
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    Interesting. Yes upon doing some research it seems young wines mean less of those tannins mentioned earlier which usually means a more light and fruity flavour.

    I might start with these really young wines and then work up the tannin scale.

    Actually quite excited. Really enjoy appreciating other drinks (though as I say usually all types of cocktails myself) while my mates slag me while they drink their Corona/Budwieser!
     
  19. Mr.D

    Mr.D
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    I drink a lot of wine but still find pinot "difficult".

    If you want to start at the softer fruitier spectrum start with Merlot. Generally speaking a good bottle of Merlot can be very useful in getting avowed non-wine drinkers "into" wine.
     
  20. Soundburst

    Soundburst
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    Oh god now I don't know what to have first. . .the Merlot or the Gallo :D
     
  21. Buzza

    Buzza
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    If you are looking for a 'light' red, try Brown Brothers Tarrango. In the past have got this at great price from likes of Somerfield, but see that elsewhere it is typically £7 or so these days.

    It is easy drinking and a very different wine from the darker reds you are not so keen on.
     
  22. jassco

    jassco
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    One thing you should consider doing to get used to the taste is to drink it with certain foods.

    Wait until you have something such as a steak (medium-rare) or chilli, and have a glass of red with it. Both the wine and the food will taste much better than alone, and it gets you used to the taste. Likewise some cheeses are brilliant, but I don't know which
     
  23. p9ul

    p9ul
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    Always used to drink Rioja - was always under impression is was a bit of a "bastard" wine as its generally amde from left overs...

    More recently moved on to Merlot, although the current favourite in our house has been Hardy's Nottage Hill Cabernet Shiraz 2010 after we were recommended it by a friend - normally about £8 but its now in tesco for a fiver...
     
  24. Soundburst

    Soundburst
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    Thanks for that. Had the Merlot there for lunch. Initially it was still a bit strong for me if I'm honest. I'm clearly a pansy if it's meant to be light.

    After the first drink of it I tasted it as opposed to drink it right down and it made it way easier to drink. By the final glass I'd got accustomed to it and it was less "woah!".
     
  25. FZR400RRSP

    FZR400RRSP
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    I'll go for a Merlot as my first choice, maybe a Shiraz second.
    If they have any from the 'Barefoot' winery in California, I will go for that.
    Wonderful stuff.
     
  26. nonumb

    nonumb
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    The only thing is gallo cab sav may be quite strong, if you really want an easy drinking fruity 'ribena-esque' wine then perhaps blossom hill may be better, really cheap and I dont like it but its often served in pubs as its easy drinking.

    I'd definitely look at at beaujolais or a burgundy as these really are very light. As I said (and someone else also said) before Fleurie is a good beaujolais and asda extra special bottle is £5. Slight taste of strawberries quite mild etc. serve ever so slightly chilled.

    Another option for you (which may not help when you're out) is to decant the wine. Get a cheap wide based decanter from a charity shop for a few quid and pour in the bottle an hour or so before drinking. You'd be amazed at the difference this makes to wines. Often the end of a bottle tastes better than the first glass and this is (aside from being ******) is due to the wine breathing and opening up.

    If you did want to get into white wine then a sancerre is a good place to start not cheap but quite nice.

    Yet another option is to go to somewhere like tesco or sainsburys and look at the taste the difference (or equivalent) range. These usually have pretty good descriptions of what the wine is like and look for 'smooth or mellow' wines.
     
  27. oska

    oska
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    I've been favouring Chianti for quite a while now.
     
  28. Lancia34

    Lancia34
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    Mmmm, one of my favourites, but only with food (not great on its own).

    I tend to drink Beaujolais if its going to be on its own or with a light dinner (pasta etc..) but like Chianti, Malbec and Rioja with heavier, meaty meals. They make a great accompaniment.
    Although I mainly drink white nowadays as the missus doesn't do red I do love a good glass of red every so often :)
     
  29. figoagogo

    figoagogo
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    I think if you are not liking trying the wine you may never like it, I don't think its a taste you will get to like? I have always like the taste of red wine from the age of about 8 (I used to be allowed small amounts watered down).

    As above I find a lot of red wines, especially the cheaper ones are best with food (red meat, cheese etc).

    Persoanlly I like Shiraz (but quite "peppery" and strong tasting - best with food), Merlot (easier drinking IMO), but will drink any grape type.

    I tend to avoid the 3 for £10 offers, especially in our local ASDA, as I find them pretty rough... mainly stick to the local Sainsburys with bottles at £5-6each. If some of the Saindbury own brand stuff is OK.

    However, like I said, you may never like it, your best bet would be to try the local stuff with the local food (when on holiday), it may just turn you!
     
  30. FZR400RRSP

    FZR400RRSP
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    I didn't like red wine at all until I was around 37 years old.
    Then I became friends with a Portugese bloke and he encouraged myself and other friends to it.
    Love it now (when I'm out, still never get the urge to have it at home).
     

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