Rear projection with Infocus X1?

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fizassist

Guest
I love my X1. People with much more expensive setups tell me my X1 on a rough off-white wall is the best thing they've ever seen. Of course, it's only good at night, and I have too many windows to make the room light-tight. I would like to look into making a rear-projection setup. This will survive the daylight a lot better, right? Is there a FAQ for how to make a decent rear projection system (using a DLP or LCD projector as the base) on a budget?

Thanks!
fiz
 

WeirdFish

Active Member
This will survive the daylight a lot better, right?
I don't see how. Plus the throw distance will be the same so you could end up with a screen in the middle of your room.

I'm presuming the X1 has a rear-pro setting that reverses the image?
 
F

fizassist

Guest
Originally posted by WeirdFish
I don't see how. Plus the throw distance will be the same so you could end up with a screen in the middle of your room.
I was actually thinking of making a smaller image. I rent, so I don't want to install a ceiling mount; that makes having the projector mid-room difficult. Right now I have it projecting from a shelf on one wall to the opposite one. If I projected from the opposite wall to a closer screen, I would get a smaller (and brighter) image.


I'm presuming the X1 has a rear-pro setting that reverses the image?
Yep.
 

WeirdFish

Active Member
Bear in mind rear pro screens aint cheap. What are you going to do about the screen, I've only seen fixed ones.
 
F

fizassist

Guest
That's the kind of info I'm looking for. I want to know if the project is practical and, if so, how to go about it. I have a 10' diagonal image now; I would be happy with something even 1/3 of that for daytime use. I may just break down and get a TV.
 

ReTrO

Well-known Member
We can do electric Vutec screens with a rear-pro fabric, not sure about other manufacturers.
 
P

Port

Guest
You can redirect light by aiming it at a mirror. You can bend it back on itself eg an 8 foot distance becomes 4 foot from lens to mirror and 4 foot from mirror to screen. You can use more than one mirror to change the angle twice. You then need to right/left picture or/and invert picture from menus, depending on which mirrors have affected picture. (With CRTs you probably have to move wires inside the machine.) (You can also use a mirror in a small room with a long-throw lens by turning the beam through 90 degrees or 2 mirrors through 180 degrees.)

Purists may say you may lose some light and induce optical imperfections, but in practice you should get away with it (I have experimented with it.).

Re. screen for rear-projection, apart from professional ones, I have been meaning to ask if anyone has any cheap ideas. Here are some ideas, but I have not tried them out. You can get a sheet of clear perspex-type stuff from DIY shops - less than £30 for 4 ft by 5 ft. (I think it is used for greenhouses.) Or you could try a glass window - could something be sprayed on this to make it opaque enough? Could it be roughed, eg sandpapered?

As a kid I made balsa planes which used tissue paper over the wings that was doped ie a liquid painted on it to make it taut and slightly opaque. Could a thick enough paper be spread over a frame and treated? Can a large sheet of appropriate thickness paper, from perhaps artists', draughtsmans' outlets, be obtained which lets sufficient light through?
 

johnsattuk

Novice Member
I have been experimenting lately with Rear Proj. and have tried several screen materials. The following observations are not meant to be at all scientific, just a resume of my attempts to find a RP surface for me.

I am projecting onto about an 80" screen, I have an Epson EMP73, a JVC D-ILA M15 and a Seleco 450 CRT to play with. The following are the materials I have tried, and my recollections, I did not take notes.

'Dalite' Da-Tex fabric (grey plastic) - picture bright quite a lot of light transmitted through to viewing room, fair amount of reflected light back toward Proj. , some hotspotting particularly with the CRT where it was easy to see the three sources. Not much good with any ambient light.

Similar type of material from ScreensUK but with a slight texture on the proj. side. This behaved very much like the Da-Tex fabric but a little better allround. I would prefer this one to the Dalite.

'BJurab' acrylic diffusion screen. I only had A4 size samples of this mat. in std. and contrast but I mounted them side by side and alongside the ScreensUK mat.to see what they looked like. The std.sample gave a nice sharp image not very contrasty but quite watchable, the contrast sample was more contrasty and the colours looked more
natural but the darker coating on the proj. side seemed to take the sharpness off the picture and also lose brightness. Not big enough to comment on hotspotting etc.

After seeing a demo of a JVC SX21 PJ on a JVC difusion screen I managed to borrow a JVC screen for a few days. Good contrast and brightness, sharp image, natural colours, not too much reflected light, could put up with some ambient light without getting washed out, Nemo looked wonderful. 'Bingo' beans on toast - start saving.

Found 'Glimm' Grayfire screen (ex Safeways type.) 3mm acrylic. Light grey colour. Very bright image, more rear reflection than the JVC, not so sharp, just a hint of hotspotting, put up with quite a lot of ambient, quite watchable, but I found it to be a little bit glary. Overall I prefered the JVC.

Got hold of 'Glimm' Glasfire screen. This is a dark coloured 'Micro-bead' technology screen. Nice bright image, wonderful colours, very sharp, close to the screen I can see the CRT scan lines more clearly than on any thing else I have tried, very litle rear reflection, all the other screens have quite a bright image on the proj. side ,but this seems to absorb the light,and the rear image is much dimmer, puts up with a lot of ambient, even with the CRT, can watch in daylight with curtains open, obviously much better with controlled lighting but amazing, even some ambient on the proj. side has little effect.

I really liked the JVC screen but the Glasfire is so much better it's a 'no contest'. Bad news is the costs are similar, when I started looking around I was hoping to find that a cheap piece of plastic fabric would do the job, ah well.
 

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