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radiators vs. RPTV DLP or Plasma

Discussion in 'General TV Discussions Forum' started by mholgate, Jun 9, 2003.

  1. mholgate

    mholgate
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    I am thinking of buying a new rear-projection DLP or possibly Plasma TV. However, the design of my room dictates that the TV would need to be placed by the side of a radiator (roughly a meter in length).

    Will this cause any serious problems with these technologies, especially any magnetically disruption?

    Thanks in advance for your comments,

    MK.
     
  2. LV426

    LV426
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    No magnetic interference with any technology EXCEPT CRTs - both direct view and 3-tube RP. Direct views may get colour staining; RPs may get convergence errors.

    LCD, DLP, Plasma not affected.

    (By the way, if you are considering the LG DLP RPTV - check out it's geometry first; the one I saw in Dixons recently displayed straight vertical lines as curves (the picture is narrower in the middle than at the top and bottom).
     
  3. Stuart Wright

    Stuart Wright
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    My first thought was that if you're getting a plasma, you could bolt it to the wall higher up. The bottom of ours is 4 feet up. There are several advantages such as being 'out of the way of little fingers' and easier to see from anywhere in the room.
    But since heat rises, I guess there is a potential problem cooking the unit if it's above a radiator.
     
  4. mholgate

    mholgate
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    Thanks for your input.

    I was thinking about the LG , but decided to wait for a Samsung / Optoma model to come out in the UK at a reasonable price. However, now I'm starting to think about forgetting the whole Plasma vs. DLP RPTV option and concidering a front-projector as my dedicated TV & DVD display device. Oh man - back to square-one! I originally thought they aren't bright enough to watch with the curtains open or with any ambient light, but starting to think otherwise.

    Do you guys know if the best front-projectors can achieve the same screen-brightness and overall quality as these alternatives?



    MK
     
  5. nathan_silly

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    My RP is right in front of a radiator- no problems with convergence or the like.

    RP is fine with normal ambiant light, as long as no direct light hits the screen.

    You also don't want to watch a Plasma in a bright room, even though they're better for that- it still destroys contrast.
     
  6. LV426

    LV426
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    In general, the 'natural' colour of any type of 'TV' (Plasma, direct view CRT, LCD, RP) is fairly dark grey. Any ambient light falling on the screen is reflected back to your eye as dark grey. It only gets any brighter than this when illuminated by whatever is inside the set.

    A Front Projection system, of necessity, has to throw onto a white or nearly white screen. Ambient light falling on the screen is therefore reflected back to your eye as white (or nearly white) - at whatever intensity the said ambient light is.

    So, a 'TV' will always reflect less ambient light than a projector screen. It is this that makes front projection 'need' dark conditions. A projector can never project black - it can only project nothing (at best). In other words, it can't make the screen darker than it is. You can only get true black by having no ambient light on the screen.
     
  7. Jpfahy

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    Any chance of moving the radiator to another part of the room?
     
  8. mholgate

    mholgate
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    >Any chance of moving the radiator to another part of the room?

    Yeah, that was the first thing I thought - It's just that draining out then refilling 3 floors worth of liquid scares me. :confused:

    My initial post was an attempt at finding an alternative solution, but it looks like it might be worth moving the radiator too in the long run. :rolleyes:
     

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