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RADEON 9600 PRO Svideo->Philips 'cool green' TV

Discussion in 'Desktop & Laptop Computers Forum' started by UoTegne, Sep 27, 2004.

  1. UoTegne

    UoTegne
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    Hi,

    Can anyone point me in the direction(s) to find out the best configurations for hooking up my Radeon 9600 PC Video Card via S-Video to my Philips 'Cool Green' 32" wide-screen telly.

    There's the choice of 3 scarts at the rear and the front s-video input. Each one seems to give differing image qualities but none are that amazing. The fonts are really quite blurry.

    The best option I've found so far seems to be configuring the front S-Video to be the TV's digital source and to go through that ...

    Also the refresh rate resolution etc make quite a difference but I can't seem to get the right combination.

    Anyone able to suggest a few links or tips?

    TIA

    Lee.
     
  2. andy572

    andy572
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    It'll never be up to the standard of a monitor, of course; but I have had reasonable results with my old telly and s-video (though it seems to vary for everyone).

    Again, you may be happy with a higher resolution, but I'd suggest using 800 x 600. Whilst I find 1024 x 768 okay, it gives an appreciably softer image. Other forum members beg to differ - but they're my findings, my own, my preciou... Ahem! :blush:

    Oh, selecting PAL can improve things a great deal, too. As with all settings, simply right-click your Windows desktop, select the 'Settings' tab on Display Properties, then click 'Advanced'. Next, click on 'Displays', then click on the tab for the appropriate display (TV, in this case). This will give you options for the display format (e.g. PAL or NTSC) and a couple of further tweaks, including 'sharpness'.

    I think that's everything, so I hope it helps and... good luck :)
     
  3. UoTegne

    UoTegne
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    I think I'm probably expecting too much out of an s-video connection to a TV. Movies and Games look great - it's just small-ish fonts that look quite blurry and unreadable. That's to be expected I guess.

    Might invest in some better quality cables to see whether that makes a difference.

    ...and then it's on to getting the sound output to deliver nice Dolby Surround into my AV amp!
     
  4. CodeThief

    CodeThief
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    Trust me, just go straight for the VGA --> RGB SCART route, Svideo looks bloody awful comparatively. Just make the cable and give it a go, I think you'll be surprised ;)

    Dave
     
  5. groovyclam

    groovyclam
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    UoTegne are you aware of this procedure for getting RGB SCART from your Radeon VGA port ?

    http://ryoandr.free.fr/english.html

    As CodeThief says it is just many times better in quality than svideo and worth the effort of soldering the lead up.

    If you are going to make it, don't follow the diagram wiring on the web-page - it is wrong - follow the connections listed in the table before the diagram.

    After you have made the lead you, will need to install PowerStrip software and set up a custom Windows resolution at the right resolution and frequency for widescreen on your TV.

    It is absolutely worth the effort for the quality boost.
     
  6. UoTegne

    UoTegne
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    Thanks for all the tips. I haven't wielded a soldering iron for 10 years but maybe it's worth the effort!
     
  7. groovyclam

    groovyclam
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    "maybe" doesn't enter into the equation!
     
  8. stlic

    stlic
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    Let me add to the VGA->Scart support club. I hadn't used a soldering iron since school but it was surprisingly easy to produce and cost only a few quid for the bits needed. The quality difference over s-video is stunning.
     
  9. aal

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    Hi,

    Thanks to all the posts in this forum i have been able to create a VGA->RGB Scart lead and used powerstrip to enable a 960x540 resolution on my Sony wega 32FQ86 CRT 16:9 TV.

    However, the picture quality of the RGB signal is worse than s-video. My picture is "flaming". what could be the cause? What kind of cable did you use? I used a 10 wire, low voltage computer cable. Did you also ground the chassis of both VGA and Scart connector (pin 21 of the scart connector)?

    And how did you go about getting the picture stable during boot (i.e. until powerstrip kicks in)?
     
  10. mbiddlecombe

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    read through this post, and have looked at both solutions on

    http://ryoandr.free.fr/english.html and
    http://www.idiots.org.uk/vga_rgb_scart/

    I am interested to understand why the two wirings are slightly different, particularly scart pins 8,16 and 18.

    Can anyone who has tried the wiring on http://ryoandr.free.fr/english.html tell me if the result cable sends an autoswitching signal to the tv to change inputs?

    This is the one thing that I need. I can get a good picture on the screen using either composite or s-video into a scart adaptor, but I want the autoswitching capability provided by many vcr/dvd players. So I am looking at these cabling solutions.

    Any help appreciated!
     
  11. groovyclam

    groovyclam
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    I can't say why the wiring is different but use the wiring from

    http://ryoandr.free.fr/english.html

    Ignore the diagram on that web page and use the table before it to get the right pin wiring.

    Autoswitching does not happen as graphics cards can't and don't change voltages (which is what happens with autoswitching).

    However you don't need it. The wiring is such that it permanently sends the "widescreen" signal so your TV will switch into widescreen all the time it is looking at your RGB signal from the HTPC.

    It is the *programmes* that you use to watch DVDs and TV progs on your HTPC that then handle the switching, and it is not upto the TV any more. i.e. when you are watching a 4:3 DVD then the DVD software detects that it is a 4:3 DVD and pads either side with black vertical bars so your TV is always widescreen, showing a widescreen picture but with or without vertical black bars as necessary.
     
  12. aal

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    mbiddlecombe,

    I used the wiring from http://ryoandr.free.fr/english.html and my Sony TV switches to the scart input whenever i startup my PC. It also automatically detects RGB and enters the "wide" mode. I guess this is what you mean.
     
  13. mbiddlecombe

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    thanks, that exactly what I mean! I'll give it a go.

    Those of you who have tried - have you started from scratch, or started from a vga cable or started from a scart cable?

    Haven't cut the end off anything yet so would be interested in knowing which solution is easiest
     
  14. groovyclam

    groovyclam
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    I started with a SCART and cut one end off ( well, not really cut, just dismantled )

    I would suggest a good quality SCART as this will have decent shielding on the wiring.

    You can dismantle a SCART quite easily and reassemble it - to see which colour wires are attached to which pins. Unscrew the plastic neck where the socket joins the lead and push the neck back onto the lead. The rest of the plastic will open up like an oyster and you can look at all the wiring. Do it carefully and you will be able to have a good butchers and put it all back together.

    You will need to solder the VGA onto the correct colour pins at one end. But you will also need to solder your phono lead onto three of the correct SCART pins at the remaining SCART end.
     
  15. mbiddlecombe

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    what about the resistor? presumably that needs to go the scart as well.
     
  16. groovyclam

    groovyclam
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  17. groovyclam

    groovyclam
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    Once you've dismantled the SCART head you can push the pins out of the metal socket using small pincer pliers or tweezers.

    This allows for easier soldering and they can then be pushed back into place.

    Push from the TV-side of the socket, pushing the pin as if you were trying to push it back into the plastic oyster case side.

    After the soldering you can pull the pin back into place with the pliers.
     
  18. aal

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    Hi,

    This regular scart-to-scart cable, does it always have all the pins connected on both ends? From your remark i gather that the audio pins are not wired?
     
  19. groovyclam

    groovyclam
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    Just follow the wiring on http://ryoandr.free.fr/english.html ( *not* the diagram - use the wiring in the table before the diagram )

    You will see in the table that the phono lead left channel, right channel and earth(?) have to be wired to three SCART pins.

    A VGA port does not carry sound so you will have to buy a phono lead that fits your soundcard/motherboard sound-out and wire that to the SCART end of your new lead. ( Unless you are using 5.1 or putting your sound into an external amp )

    If these pins are already connected when you open up the "real" SCART-to-SCART ( as they probably will be - to carry the audio from a DVD or set-top-box ) then just cut them and solder the phono to the three appropriate pins.

    Just open up a SCART as I have described - it will all become clear.
     
  20. mbiddlecombe

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    Can anyone help me with finding a 75 Ohm resistor for this cable? Don't know where to start looking. Any good online shops in the UK for this kind of thing?
     
  21. groovyclam

    groovyclam
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    Maplins - go to any Maplins in the high street since a resistor will be less than a pound and P&P from Maplins online will be more than the resistor itself.

    Maplins will have all the other bits you may need - soldering iron, solder, multimeter, VGA casing and VGA port to solder the lead to, etc. etc.
     

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