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R1 Superbit DVDs and Projectors..

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by guido, May 2, 2005.

  1. guido

    guido
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    OK - a numpty question.... (probably?)

    Been meaning to buy The Fifth Element for a while, and am deciding whether to get the Special Ediition (which has DTS), or the R1 Superbit version (also DTS).

    Am using Pioneer 575 DVD via component into a SP4805 projector. Am I going to notice any difference with the superbit version? Have never bought a superbit before. Is it a re-master, i.e. have they cleaned it up at all? and what about all the NTSC lower res? 3:2 pulldown conversion thingy, 50-60Hz malarky and so on? I think my 575 is multi-region :confused: :eek:

    Words of wisdom from the enlightened much appreciated!

    Guido
     
  2. Oakleyspatz

    Oakleyspatz
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    I am just the man to help you !!!
    I have a SP4805 and the Superbit R1 of The Fifth Element. The image has far less grain than the standard version and better colour saturation. Shadow detail is also better. As with all superbits, the sound is also in DTS. There are several versions out on DVD of this movie and I think the latest Special Edition uses the same Superbit version of the movie with the extras on a seperate disc.
    On a tv, you may not notice the difference but on an 80inch screen you will!
     
  3. kurtz

    kurtz
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    Hi guido,

    If have problems with 3:2 , 60Hz stuff then you could consider the R4 superbit edition which is in PAL and, according to Michael's DVD is R2 and R4 dual coded. Australia is PAL and a lot of Australian discs are R2, R4 dual coded so they can be sold in South Africa (which is R2 I think).

    A review of the disc is at Michael's DVD and it can be shipped from most R4 online retailers such as EzyDVD .

    A comparison on DVD Answers concludes that the R2 special edition has the same transfer as the original R2 :( .
     
  4. Maff et1

    Maff et1
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    Your Screenplay 4805 has a native resolution the same as NTSC so using R1/NTSC wont reduce the quality.

    3:2 pulldown is the conversion from film to NTSC, it's related to the '50-60Hz malarky'. And confusing as hell to describe.

    I've just attempted to descibe it to myself 3 times and failed. So here I go again...

    Film is 24 frames per second
    PAL is 50 frames. To create the PAL image from the Film just double it, this gives 48 frames so PAL runs slightly fast (4% faster than real time), but you don't notice.
    NTSC is 60 frames. Film speed doesn't simply multiply up to give a speed near enough to NTSC to look right (48 frames would move to fast, 72 too slow). So for NTSC you have to mix film frames when interlacing. You have to alternate between using 2 and 3 NTSC frames for each film frame.

    In thoery PAL should look smoother during rapid movements like pans, but not enough to notice with a good quality transfer.

    I'm sure somebody else can explain it in words that actually make sense.

    Also, I should check your 575 for MR before spending money (borrow a friends disk if you can), as if it isn't it can't be made MR without a special remote (costs about 20 quid).

    From the screenshots pointed to by Kurtz the superbit does seem to have better image quality (especially background details). Sod's law as I've just bought the SE (still, 20 quid for 3 at woolies so no bad value).
     
  5. FoxyMulder

    FoxyMulder
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    Film is 24frames per second
    Pal is 25 frames per second
    NTSC is 30 frames per second

    The settings you refer to are hertz 50 for Pal and 60 for NTSC

    Most if not all NTSC discs are produced for 24frames per second hence the 3:2 pulldown effect.

    In theory Pal should be better but in practise you don't notice a difference and Pal speedup can affect sound if your ear is very highly trained to notice it, personally i suggest shopping around the world for the best versions, sometimes this is the Pal version sometimes its the NTSC version.
     
  6. guido

    guido
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    Thx for all the replies! :thumbsup:

    In the meantime found this really good explanation of Pulldown and all things conversion wise... has examples and diagrams etc:
    http://www.projectorpeople.com/tutorials/pulldown.asp

    Wouldn't mind finding out whether the 2-disc SE version is Superbit equiv or not... only way I expect would be to examine VOB file sizes without the sound included. If my 575 is multiregion (think it is - will look at paperwork tonight) then think will have a punt on the R1 Superbit disc.

    Projector/HC disassembled at the mo as in middle of major DIY project to build myself PJ Lift :eek: but its taking ages as dont have the time to devote to it :boring: :(

    Thanks again :smashin:
     
  7. dirge

    dirge
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    www.dvdbeaver.com <- you'll find lots of detailed comparisons on films.

    Seems versions can vary quite a bit mind, so always check this site.
     

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