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Quietness against Temperature

Discussion in 'Desktop & Laptop Computers Forum' started by annefromuk, Feb 23, 2003.

  1. annefromuk

    annefromuk
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    Hi,

    I have finally decided to replace my PC (233 Mhz :rolleyes: )

    The replacement is going to do as much as I can get out of it, including Digital TV, and will be on most of the time.
    So I need to make it as Quiet as possible.

    To cut down noise I am considering using a Hard Drive enclosure and to line the new case with Acoustic material.

    Does anyone have any experience of these methods, and do I risk overheating the PC?

    I have also seen a Fanless PSU, by using this could the inside of the case overheat? (not sure if a standard fan PSU gives additional cooling benefits inside the case)

    Regards
    Anne
     
  2. owain_thomas

    owain_thomas
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    From what I've read on this and personal experience I would say that the hard drives are usually pretty quiet if you choose the right ones (seagate barracudas) so you can get beter bang (or lack of bang I suppose) for your buck elsewhere in terms of making your pc quiet. Also the acoustic material for lining the case is quite expensive for what it does.

    Fanless PSUs are not quite as plug and play as their conventional counterparts, they require case mods to fit and need heatsinks fitted to the back of the case to dissapate the heat they generate. If you take a look at www.silentpcreview.com they have constantly updated league tables of the quiestest PC components, it is possible to get a VERY quiet PSU with a traditional form factor and fans ( http://www.silentpcreview.com/modul...ns&file=index&req=viewarticle&artid=56&page=1 )

    Zalman have until recently held the crown for best heatsink with their Flower cooler, silentpcreview have recently tested a new thermalright HS which is the best yet: http://www.silentpcreview.com/modul...ns&file=index&req=viewarticle&artid=72&page=1 couple this with a variable speed fan control and a quiet fan and you should have a pretty silent PC.

    One last area to consider is the graphics card, if you don't want to play the very latest games then there's only one choice: the radeon 9000 (non-pro version) this has no fan at all and gives great picture quality, try http://www.theoverclockingstore.co....70b741d452a426fdf7f4b2931c2eff9&codeid=801065 (ignore the picture though it's not right)

    HTH
    Owain
     
  3. feet14

    feet14
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    I'd try enclosing the Hard Disk in bubble-wrap and check on it every few minutes in case it overheats. Older Hard Disks tend to run cooler. You will be surprised by how much noise is cut out but it is unlikely to give you silence - I'd second the Seagate Barracuda recommendation if you can afford it.

    For a PSU, your best bet is to have someone who knows what they are doing replace the fan with a quiet papst one - MODIFYING A PSU CAN BE DANGEROUS.
     
  4. annefromuk

    annefromuk
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    Thanks owain_thomas & feet14,

    I think I will use Acoustic Materials after reading the Silent PC Review of it (and oddly it looks like it will out live all the over parts of the PC).

    As for Hard Disk Enlosure, not sure at the moment, as the Hard Drive I am interested in is the 10,000 Rpm Western Digital Raptor (my PC is still about 6 months away so hopefully the Serial ATA version will be out then). I realise the faster RPM will mean more noise, but also more heat, so enclosure might be bad idea.

    The fanless PSU I am considering is a 350w ATX Fanless PSU called "ProSilence 350" for a review go to Warp2Search
    Expensive though (£150), so still very undecided.

    Regards
    Anne
     
  5. owain_thomas

    owain_thomas
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    that fanless PSU does look quite interesting, I must say I haven't seen that before, all the ones I 've seen have been a lot more fiddly than that and have required you to build your own heatsink on the outside.

    Have you seen any more reviews/info in english for this PSU, a google search just keeps coming back to the warp2search page.

    Cheers,
    Owain
     
  6. annefromuk

    annefromuk
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    Hi owain_thomas,

    The Warp2Search review is one of first on this Fanless PSU, although I expect there will be many more reviews in time.

    I believe most noise is created by the PSU, so using a fanless one could be very beneficial :)

    Regards
    Anne
     
  7. powergyoza

    powergyoza
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    There are users of the prosilence that say it's a really tight fit to mount. Otherwise it's fine (if not really expensive) for any non-overclocked single CPU/non-GeforceFX setup. Anything over 200 watts and it apparently gets really hot...

    ExoticPC.com offers a 14dB PSU called the SilenX that is nearly as good. Someone on the SPCR forums has used both and chooses the SilenX over the prosilence. And he builds computers for recording studios to boot!

    EDIT: forgot to answer some of your other questions.
    If you're going to get anything other than a Barracuda 4/5 or possibly the IBM Deskstar 180GXP, you'll need to have it in an enclosure. I don't recommend bubble wrap as a solution. Bubble wrap is mostly air - a very good insulator. My solution for relative silence was to enclose my hdds in printmaking rubber, but any dense rubber free of air pockets should work. Here's an image:

    [​IMG]

    The only off-the-shelf solution I'd recommend is the SmartDrive. Do not get the SilentDrive. It may cook your hdd.

    The best foam I've seen so far is called AcoustiPak. SPCR has a review of that...
     
  8. annefromuk

    annefromuk
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    Welcome to the forum powergyoza,

    Thanks for the advice, looks like I will have to keep watch on both those PSU's (my PC is still about 6 months away).

    Interesting that you mentioned a non-GeforceFX setup, as it's the card I was going to use, well up until I read how loud it was :thumbsdow:

    Regards
    Anne
     
  9. james.miller

    james.miller
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    the gf fx was a very bad design right from the start. good on paper, but horrible in practice.its under-powered and needs rediculously loud cooling.
    the stock fan on the 9700's i think are pretty quiet - though they could be quieter.

    @ owain_thomas: the Zalman flower was never that good a heatsink. thermalright have allways held the top spot. their slk-800 was the absolute best untill they released the slk-900u. Also, you forgot to mention that it:
    a) doesnt use clips, it uses the four holes on the motherboard. meaning you will have to take the board out ever time you put the h/s on. (you can see this in the link he provided)
    b) only fits on a handful of AMD motherboards becuase, for some reason, thermalright decided to rotate the h/s fins 90 degrees. now those fins touch the capacitors on many boards meaning a lot of damage can be done.

    i saw a test of the slk-900 undertaken on AMD boards. out of the 15 motherboards tried, the h/s would only fit on one of them - an epox. Not good.

    c) its the best, but only just. you will only see 1 or 2c difference between that and the slk-800, which is quite a lot cheaper than the 900.

    i would recommend the slk-800 instead. it did a grand job with my athlon xp1800 - temps were 31c idle 37c load with a 20cfm fan (very quiet).
     

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