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Quick Resolution Question, Very Confused!

Discussion in 'LCD & LED LCD TVs' started by e-cams, Sep 2, 2005.

  1. e-cams

    e-cams
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    Hi all,
    I've been searching the forums but i'm a bit confused so please advise on the following:

    1) Will there ever be a 32" set with a native resolution of 1920x1080i or is that just not possible (do you have to buy at least a 37" for this?).

    2) When sky broadcasts and we begin using either HD-DVDs or Blu-Ray players will we have an option to output either 1280x720p or 1920x1080i or will it just output the larger resolution and reduce to fit?

    3) If you have a set which has 1280x720p resolution is it best to stick with that or output 1920x1080i and scale down?

    4) Finally, what do the i and p's stand for/mean????

    Thanks!
    Matt :clap:
     
  2. scarty16

    scarty16
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    1) Who knows

    2) Nobody is sure

    3) depends on teh screen and what you are watching

    4) I=Interlaced, P=Progressive
     
  3. NicolasB

    NicolasB
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    My monitor at home is 24" and has a native resolution of 1920x1200, and Apple's 30-inch "cinema" monitor is 2560x1600, so it's technically possible; but there would be no point. In order to actually be able to make out all the detail of a 1920x1080 display, even on a 45" screen like Sharp's LC45GD1E, you have to be sitting only 6 or 7 feet from the screen. Not enough people would want to watch a 32" TV from a distance of 4 feet to make it worth manufacturer's while to make one that's 1920x1080. (I'm actually surprised they're doing it at 37").

    No way to be sure until the service starts.

    As far as Sky HD is concerned, most of the output will (I suspect) be 720p at source. I hope we'll see 1080i for movies, but we may not. My guess is that the Sky HD box will be able to convert either format into the other on the fly, although it may do a rather poor job of it.

    You're unlikely to have the option - the source material will be one or the other. But if you do have a choice, 720p would look better because you'd have double the frame rate at the same resolution. (And that's before you start to consider deinterlacing artefacts).

    Interlaced and Progressive. A 1080i signal (in this country) will be 25 frames per second (each 1920x1080), broadcast as 50 half-frames (or "fields"). The first field of a pair contains lines 1, 3, 5, etc. of the picture, and the second contains lines 2, 4, 6, etc. (Actually that's a bit of an oversimplification - it may be that whatever it is was actually filmed as 1080i - i.e. the camera recorded 50 half-frames per second rather than 25 full frames which were subsequently split).

    With a 720p signal (in the UK) you get 50 full 1280x720 frames per second.

    1080i is ideal for cinema films. The source material is only 24 frames per second, so this is speeded up to 25, and then each frame split into 2 fields. You therefore get the film at 1920x1080 resolution. (Of course, just because it's the best choice for cinema films doesn't mean Sky of the disc issuers will actually use it).

    For something like a football match, 720p may be better - the resolution is lower (1280x720) but you get twice as many frames per second, so rapid movement of (e.g.) the ball seems smoother.
     

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