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Quick question re rainbowing

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by Steviefull, Feb 16, 2005.

  1. Steviefull

    Steviefull
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    It appears from what i have read rainbowing is purely due to an individuals view, so in theory i can watch a film fine on a pj, but someone else could come in and see rainbows all over the shop. Is this fair enough, so as long as a pj tests ok when i demo it, it should be okay when in the home???
     
  2. PJTX100

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    I've seen one or two people comment that they "have suddenly started to see rainbows" after happily watching DLP for some time. But I think this is the small minority of the minority who have issues with DLP.
    I've also read comment that some people find DLP to give eye strain and headaches, and this happens only after prolonged viewing which may not be evident from a short demo.

    You can't do any better though than what you are planning - go and demo DLP and if it's OK then go for it. I'm sure lots of people buy DLP machines blind and have no issues at all...PJ
     
  3. KraGorn

    KraGorn
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    There's also the converse situation .. I see rainbows, always have, and when I got my first DLP for some days it was annoying, but the PQ was so much better than the LCD I had I persevered and after a few days I found (as is commonly the case it seems) that I ceased to notice them .. I see them still but they don't register, if you see what I mean. :)

    So, if you're only mildly affectedand not greatly disturbed by the effect then it's probable you'll also learn to live with them .. however, if you're one of those who suffers eye strain or worse then it's unlikely exposure would reduce that effect.
     
  4. foghorn

    foghorn
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    Some AV shops will lend you a projector for a couple of days to try in your home.

    Watch a couple of films if there is no discomfort you will probably be ok.

    Foghorn
     
  5. LV426

    LV426
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    As well as individuals' visual acuity, visibility or the Rainbow depends to a degree on the material you are watching, distance from the screen, and other factors.

    The rainbow becomes visible as a rainbow when you dart your eyes across the screen to follow a contrasty object. You are most likely to do this when there is a lot of moving action on the screen. It doesn't have to be blockbuster-style action through; watching Phil Collins' drumming (the movement of his hands, drumsticks) did it again for me, recently. Or, scanning the width of the screen, for example to read subtitles.

    The more rapidly you dart, the more likely you are to see the rainbow. Hence, the closer you are and/or the larger the projected image, the more visible it's likely to be.

    The actual visible rainbow is only a part of the issue, though. In my case, simply watching a more or less static image (no panning/darting) I find uncomfortable. I suspect that, at a level just below my consciousness, I'm still seeing the flickering colour and it's nauseating me.

    All of which is a long way round to say:

    Do your demo, for as long as you possibly can (and in any case, no less than a couple of hours), using a variety of likely material, in conditions as close to those you will have at home.
     

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