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quick amp/speaker power question

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by Korben Dallas, Oct 2, 2002.

  1. Korben Dallas

    Korben Dallas
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    Having finally decided on what amp to get and what speakers

    amp- yamaha rxv630rds

    speakers - mission 77 series package

    I got told tonight by someone that the amp should have more power than the speakers or I could damage it.

    the amp has 75w per channel and I belive the speakers have 100w . Tell me this isn't true and that I don't have to go looking for another set of speakers. Does this indeed make any difference as he said if the speakers are trying to get 100w and only 75w is available it is damaging.
     
  2. Reiner

    Reiner
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    Indeed you can damage a speaker easier with an underpowered amp than using a higher powered amp, but as long as you keep volume levels normal there isn't anything to worry about.
    As well the figures you have stated are max. values and thus do not represent the permanent load.

    In short: I don't see any problem with that combination as long as you don't try to run a disco on the weekend ...
     
  3. buns

    buns
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    Dont forget that the speaker power rating isnt the power that they use. It is supposedl th max power they can handle.

    Damaging the amp is more applicable when talking about a tough load, say driving a 4 ohm load with an amp which has 6 ohms as its minimum. I for example use a power amp that is 50wpc, but, it drives my speakers to levels where much more powerful amps would just have run out of steam. The power ratings need a bit of understading at times!

    As reiner said, you should have no problems even with quite high levels.

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  4. konghh

    konghh
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    Hi Korben Dallas. Whoever told you that has half-baked idea about hifi IMO. You will only likely to damage your speaker if you really turn up the amp's volume to extreme, say...3 o'clock, and by that time, you have to worry about your ear rather then the speaker because by then, you would have heard a lot of distortion and unlistenable sound anyway :)

    FYI, I have a 630 and a speaker with max. power handling of 700watts at 4-ohms. Now, tell me, where on earth am I going to find an amp that gives out 700watts for a speaker that originally cost only 900 Sterling Pound? So don't worry. Enjoy the music.
     
  5. buns

    buns
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    my amp will drive about 1.5k watts per channel into 1 ohm........it cost me only £550. But that has dido to do with performance. I could quote you up to about 5kwatts, it depends how you are measuring it.

    But dont worry about the power, you are fine.

    For info though, my yamaha amp will not be much different from the sony, but it shuts down before 10 oclock when driving 4 ohm speakers. I strongly doubt that the sony can manage 700 watts into 4 ohm at anything other than a peak.

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  6. garmtz

    garmtz
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    Like said before in this thread, it is relatively easy to blow up speakers with an underpowered amp. The distortion an amp creates when driven to the point of clipping is sure to fry some tweeters. Powerful amps have better control and will not distort easily, so are safer to use with ANY speaker.

    Don't worry too much about power (handling). Better to worry about sound quality.
     
  7. Korben Dallas

    Korben Dallas
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    The guy that told me is training to be a sound engineer and told me thats what they taught him yesterday.

    Thanks for the help guys
     
  8. buns

    buns
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    excuse my earlier post, nasty lab supervisor annoyed me!

    I dont like to say your friend is wrong, but he may have misunderstood. The set up you suggest will not have difficulties.

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  9. Reiner

    Reiner
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    The guy that told me is training to be a sound engineer and told me thats what they taught him yesterday.

    As I said before he is basically right, the correct term for this is called "clipping", i.e. when the amp is driven to it's limits it will output something close to a square wave (DC) and thus damage the speaker. This is "easily" achieved by wanting to increase the volume using an underpowered amplifier.

    An amp with too much power can of course blow the speakers, too, but most speakers can withstand short surges in excess of the ratings - but only for a short moment (a fraction of seconds).

    So it's very much up to you to prevent this - when you hear any distortion lower the volume instantly!
     

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