Questions about external USB HDDs

Discussion in 'Computer Components' started by Foebane72, Mar 1, 2013.

  1. Foebane72

    Foebane72
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    I have a small amount of data (16Gb or so) on my HDD.

    I am currently using flash drives for storage, but I find them slow for large transfers, and I am concerning about constantly plugging and unplugging them to bring each "copy" of my files up to date.

    I also have a partition on my internal HDD which is a copy of my data which I "hide" with the Win7 feature "Computer Management", and make available when I want to make updates.

    Lastly, every now and then I will burn backup copies onto DVD+R as added protection, but it's a pain having to prepare the relevant files for each disc (which I number) because of the small capacities of the format.

    I look at SSDs but cannot afford them, and it's Flash memory which I don't entirely trust yet, but I've heard countless users boast about the speed and reliability of external USB HDDs for a while now, and I've resisted so far.

    Ideally, if I had a USB 2.0 HDD, I'd like to make a copy of the data, dated in a folder, every time I made an update - it would help to make use of the large capacity of any USB HDD which I used, and make data salvage easier. But how slow would such a transfer be each time?

    I also assume I can create partitions on the USB HDD with something like EaseUS Partition Manager? AND hide the partitions (or logical drives) using the "Computer Management" tool of Win7?

    Basically, is it worth me going to external HDD/DVD+R rather than Flash/DVD+R for backup? And can anyone recommend a reasonable sub-£50 drive with a modestly small capacity?
     
  2. Foebane72

    Foebane72
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  3. bobbymax

    bobbymax
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    Last edited: Mar 1, 2013
  4. Foebane72

    Foebane72
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    Can one keep such a device plugged in via USB all the time? What about when the computer restarts?
     
  5. bobbymax

    bobbymax
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    Yes no problem I have mine as an incremental back-up using Acronis, so leave it plugged in all the time. :thumbsup:
     
  6. Foebane72

    Foebane72
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    Thank you all for your advice, but I have changed my mind, as I discovered that with the small amount of data I am backing up, Verbatim DVD+Rs with their AZO technology would suit me better and probably last longer and more permanently, especially with multiple copies. And it's cheaper, too.

    Sorry about that, all, but I've never had an external HDD before, and given what I've heard about the longevity of HDDs (or lack thereof) and the high cost of SSDs (essentially massive flash drives), then I think this solution works out best for me.
     
  7. EndlessWaves

    EndlessWaves
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    Backup is about having a copy of the data, not of having the data on something reliable. How likely it is to break down should solely factor into running costs (and time spent restoring if relevant). Growing to think you can trust a medium is not a good habit from a backup point of view.
     

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