Question for builders

HMHB

Distinguished Member
I'm going to have my fascias and soffits replaced shortly but I'm also now seriously considering a conservatory as well.

Should I put off having them replaced until I've had the conservatory done? The bloke who's going to do the fascias says that I should have them done first otherwise he won't be able to replace the one where the conservatory has been put.
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
We had all ours done and we have a conservatory.

It just meant they had to put a scaffolding bridge over the conservatory.

I don't recall them using any othe scaffolding, just ladders.

Ours was done by a big company and they just swallowed the price. I imagine that any builder that wants the work might, but I guess a small local company might want to add the scaffolding cost to the bill.

Cheers,

Nigel
 

paulyoung666

Distinguished Member
We had all ours done and we have a conservatory.

It just meant they had to put a scaffolding bridge over the conservatory.

I don't recall them using any othe scaffolding, just ladders.

Ours was done by a big company and they just swallowed the price. I imagine that any builder that wants the work might, but I guess a small local company might want to add the scaffolding cost to the bill.

Cheers,

Nigel
+1 :smashin:
 

bodoman

Well-known Member
I would suggest having them done first as i cant see any financial advantage in leaving them until after having the conservatory in place whereas it will cost another 3-400 quid to have a sacffold bridge over it.
I managed a maintence contract for a scaffolding company that provided scaffolding where needed to council house properties over 8 years and our main source of income was derived from erecting scaffolds over conservatorys, some them strected the whole width of the house meaning support towers had to be erected in the neighbours property either side, sometimes the neighbours also had outbuildings or a conservatory butting up which made this impossible, the only way then was to take sections of the conservatory roof out to put the support towers in, all the above racks up more costs and inconvenience of course.:)
 

EarthRod

Distinguished Member
I would recommend holding off replacing the fascias and soffits until next spring. The weather this winter is not the best for this sort of work.

Also, get them replaced first then have a new conservatory installed.
 

KUBBY

Well-known Member
A lot of these companies have little work for their employees in January/February so ordering now for fitting then,could get you some discount.

Have the Soffits and Facias done first but, check the contract.If they stipulate Removal and replacement of existing,then make sure that they do and not just cover them.

The company that did mine (Well established and Known name) tried this with me and I made them take them off and do it as agreed.

Good luck,

K.
 

HMHB

Distinguished Member
Cheers everyone, I will get them replaced first. The bloke who's going to do them has done 3 other properties on my street and he definitely removes the old ones. He's quoted for that and I've watched him do the others :)
 

chipper

Active Member
Are you sure about getting a conservatory? I've ripped mine down and had a summer room type extension built.
It was too hot in summer, too cold in winter. They won't last like an extension and won't put much money on your house.
 

NewfieDrool

Banned
Will be interesting to see if holding back will save you money. With the increase in VAT, insurances and more I have a feeling prices will rise even though they need work.

Might still get some good discounts but overheads to firms may push the prices up including material which no doubt will cost more too.

Just a thought.
 

HMHB

Distinguished Member
I think a conservatory might be my best idea as it has to go on the back and the bedrooms are at the back, so a more solid construction might not be the best idea (it's a bungalow). The problem I have is that this place is very small and I'm fed up of having no room.

I'm not in the slightest bit bothered about the value of the house to be honest :)
 

HMHB

Distinguished Member
I'm pretty sure that I will have it brick built up until the level of the windows but I believe that if it has a glass roof then I won't need planning permission?

I was also looking to get underfloor heating in it.
 

elliotskywalker

Active Member
Hello John,have you considered getting a local bricklayer or builder to do your foundations and dwarf Walls.then getting the double glazed firms in to quote just for supply and insulatio.this will save you at least a thousand pounds.do not under any circumstances use the electric underfloor heating ,the one with wires under the tiles/flooring as it will cost you a fortune in running costs....get the hot water underfloor heating or just a small double radiator.if the conservatory is going to be on the large size it may be worth getting an air conditioning unit for summer cooling that also heats in the winter.iT is the type that will fit into your brick walls. If you need any advice just ask as my dad is a builder,he will give you good free advice:thumbsup:
 
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HMHB

Distinguished Member
Hello John,have you considered getting a local bricklayer or builder to do your foundations and dwarf Walls.then getting the double glazed firms in to quote just for supply and insulatio.this will save you at least a thousand pounds.do not under any circumstances use the electric underfloor heating ,the one with wires under the tiles/flooring as it will cost you a fortune in running costs....get the hot water underfloor heating or just a small double radiator.if the conservatory is going to be on the large size it may be worth getting an air conditioning unit for summer cooling that also heats in the winter.if you need any advice just ask as my dad is a builder,he will give you good free advice:thumbsup:
Cheers for that. I've got someone coming round to have a look sometime next week. He's the brother of someone I've known for 35 years so I know I can trust him and he did my mate's extension. I'm wondering if I should go the whole hog and have it with a proper slated roof for proper insulation and to keep excess heat out. If I have it done it will be South facing and about 7 to 8 ft deep and 18 ft wide.
 

EarthRod

Distinguished Member
I'm pretty sure that I will have it brick built up until the level of the windows but I believe that if it has a glass roof then I won't need planning permission?
Bit of a grey area with council approval. Best to seek advice with your planning office.

All sorts of factors have to be addressed, like how far from the next door neighbour's fence is it? Does the conservatory go over any underground services? Does it effect your next door neighbours light?

Also, if you install the conservatory and your next door neighbour objects to the council and you haven't consulted the planning office or obtained approval - you might be asked by the council to take it down!

Best be safe than sorry. :thumbsup:
 

HMHB

Distinguished Member
It's going to be at least 10 ft from the fence so I think I should be OK but will check everything first. I know for a fact that it won't be going over the sewerage pipes because they go directly under my pond :laugh:
 

Ian J

Banned
Are you sure about getting a conservatory? I've ripped mine down and had a summer room type extension built.
It was too hot in summer, too cold in winter. They won't last like an extension and won't put much money on your house.
Apart from planning permission the other big advantage of conservatories is that they let in far more light than most extensions which can be of great benefit to the room that the conservatory is attached to which otherwise might end up too dark.

We had ours built a few months ago by a small general builder who subcontracted the bricklaying and it's warm enough to sit in at the moment even with snow all around
 

HMHB

Distinguished Member
Apart from planning permission the other big advantage of conservatories is that they let in far more light than most extensions which can be of great benefit to the room that the conservatory is attached to which otherwise might end up too dark.

We had ours built a few months ago by a small general builder who subcontracted the bricklaying and it's warm enough to sit in at the moment even with snow all around
Yes good point about the light. It would be across the 2 bedrooms, only one of which is used as a bedroom, the other one being an office. I'm not too bothered about it making the bedroom darker but it might be a problem if I ever have to sell?
 

IronGiant

Moderator
You'd probably want some massive rooflights in the roof if it's solid; to allow light into those back rooms then... May as well go for all glass/polycarb...
 

HMHB

Distinguished Member
I might even see about opening up the office room fully to the extension so it should get enough light in there. The main problem with the lack of light might then be limited to the bedroom, which wouldn't be a problem for me I'm sure.

I really would like to put a bedroom and a bathroom up in the loft but sadly the roof pitch is shallow and there's barely enough room to stand up even in the highest part of the loft :(
 

Dave Weystoner

Active Member
I might even see about opening up the office room fully to the extension so it should get enough light in there. The main problem with the lack of light might then be limited to the bedroom, which wouldn't be a problem for me I'm sure.:(
Check with your local building control officer on this: a conservatory should have the facility to be shut off from the main house with external-grade windows/doors (at least until building control has signed it off), otherwise you have to compensate for the heat loss elsewhere in the house, which is very tricky to calculate.

Dave
 

elliotskywalker

Active Member
Just to throw a spanner in the works.my dad put self cleaning glass in his conservatory and it works a treat and it was installed 5years ago. Ps. A south facing conservatory will get very hot in the summer months....please be very aware of this
 
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Orson

Moderator
There are quite a few quirks & niggles with conservatories & planning, depending on the location of your property, the way it's facing, and the size & construction. If you do need planning your local council have been known to be very picky - and this is coming from someone who fits conservatories for a living, in your area, and has dealt with them on several occasions.

What you really need is someone fairly local to give you a bit of free, independent advice... :D
 

HMHB

Distinguished Member
I'm hoping that I can get something done in the loft instead but that might be too tricky and expensive. As the level of the roof will need to be raised I imagine that planning permission will rear it's ugly head!
 

HMHB

Distinguished Member
I'm still thinking about this. The builder still hasn't turned up to have a look and give me an idea about price.

I'm wondering at what point it becomes just as cheap to knock down the bungalow and rebuild it as I require!
 

Orson

Moderator
What work are you after John, loft conversion or conservatory?
 

HMHB

Distinguished Member
I really don't know mate. It depends on what can be done and for what price. I might even try to get one of the bedrooms extended onto the drive and out of the back but not sure if it's possible.

The only way I could have a loft conversion would be to remove the roof and build up as there's not enough room up there.

I just don't have enough space as it's only a small 2 bedroom bungalow and one of the bedrooms is my office. Moving would be too expensive I think.
 

Orson

Moderator
As I mentioned in an earlier post... what you really need is someone to have a look & give you some free, independent advice... :D

I'll be in Sutton & Forest Town on Friday if you want to put the kettle on :)
 

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