question about screen

Discussion in 'Plasma TVs Forum' started by johnni612, Mar 23, 2006.

  1. johnni612

    johnni612
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    hi guys. im new. i was browsing plasma forums to ask this question. is there a way i can fill the whole screen w/o using the ZOOM option? i have a Akai PDP4273M 42 in Flat Panel Plasma TV. I also am using a HD Scientific Atlanta Explorer 3250HD cable box and also using the RED, BLUE, GREEN connection to view HD shows. It seems like when i watch normal tv, local hd channels, it only uses the middle part of the tv (leaving a 6 inch border on both sides). it only FILLS up when i watch HD premium channels. is this normal? when i connect my dvd player, and a regular cable box, it fills up the screen. is this normal? i know my screen has several options: fill-all, wide, anamorphic (zoom). its on fill-all and yet it has a border on local, and local HD channels. any inputs?
     
  2. choddo2006

    choddo2006
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    Are they 4:3 transmissions? Are you in the US by any chance? I'd have thought the local HD channels would be 16:9 though, what happens if you put it on wide?
     
  3. johnni612

    johnni612
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    when i put it on wide, it does the same thing but 'wider'. only way to watch it is in zoom (anamorphic). it sucks. only dvd's, hd premium work on 'fall-all'.

    ps: yes im in the U.S.
     
  4. johnni612

    johnni612
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    nvm..found my solution..

    "Wide Screen Aspect Ratio
    Plasma televisions have a widescreen 16:9 aspect ratio, which was originally designed to match the natural field of view of the human eye. Of course you're familiar with the wide screen aspect from watching movies in the theater—and a widescreen plasma TV allows you to watch movies in the format the director intended. The 16:9 aspect ratio is also the chosen format for HDTV content, whether it's broadcast over the air or through digital cable or satellite TV.

    But what happens when you watch a standard (4:3) TV program or a computer image? Choosing a plasma TV that scales images appropriately will give you the most enjoyment from your plasma, as well as extending its life. There are several algorithms used to scale incoming video signals to match the plasma's native 16:9 aspect ratio. All plasma screens can show the image in its original 4:3 format with bars (either black or gray) on the sides of the image, but there can be some variation among plasma screens in how well they convert a 4:3 image to the widescreen monitor. Manufacturing engineers accomplish a "best of both worlds" approach by limiting the stretching in the center of the screen, or by enlarging the entire image to larger than the screen size, and "cropping" the edges. This scaling technique allows the most stretching to be located on the edges of the image, thus reducing visible distortion.

    So basically there are a number of ways to display an incoming "standard" 4:3 picture from satellite, VCR, or cable TV, and some plasmas do it better than others. It can be displayed as is, with the bars on the sides. In "Zoom" mode, the image will have very little distortion or stretching and will fill the entire screen area. However, this mode often cuts off too much of the picture around the edges, and can cause motion artifacts and pixelation—resulting in a "grainy" or jagged appearance.

    Typically the best option for converting a 4:3 NTSC TV signal is the "Just" or "Full" mode—you'll see the same idea called different names by different plasma manufacturers. This aspect ratio option converts the 4:3 image with specially designed algorithms, which reduce the visible "stretching" as much as possible by using a combination of techniques, cropping very little of the image and situating any stretching or distortion to the outer edges where it will be less noticiable. If it's done well, you'll hardly notice any difference at all."
     

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