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Question Question about frequency response and Impedance

Alphafighter

Established Member
For frequency response, does larger range generally mean better speaker?

For a receiver with minimum impedance of 6ohms, does it support 8ohms? is a reciever with minimum impedance of 6 ohms better or a receiver with 6|8 ohms better?

sorry for such newbie questions. Thank you.
 

AV COM

Prominent Member
AVForums Sponsor
For frequency response, does larger range generally mean better speaker?

For a receiver with minimum impedance of 6ohms, does it support 8ohms? is a reciever with minimum impedance of 6 ohms better or a receiver with 6|8 ohms better?

sorry for such newbie questions. Thank you.
Hello,

Generally a wider frequency response is better as its an indication the speaker is more capable. The generally accepted working range of the human ear 20Hz to 20kHz. Most speakers wont be capable of going down to 20Hz but its usually not an issue as a subwoofer can be used for low frequencies.

Impedance is a measure of the load an amplifier can manage. The lower the number the more difficult the load. This means that if your speakers impedance is rated above or equal to the impedance stated for your amplifier, your system will run fine. If your speaker(s) are rated lower than your amplifier than you should not use those speakers with that amplifier.
 
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ashenfie

Distinguished Member
I general better AVR handle low ohms speakers better.

Frequency response is often printed in the spec's generally don't mean a lot. Quality not quantity is what you want. In theory the human ear can hear between 20hz and 20khz. More likely many can't hear much over 16khz when older. Thats not really an issue and the areas of the frequency spectrum affect use differently, see below.

Sub bass is 20hz to 60hz. Music wise a bass guitar would struggle to get to 41hz and in any case hard for us to hear due to what know as Fletcher Munson Curves. The frequency is best handled with a subwoofer to shake us as much anything else, so great for movies.

Bass is 60hz to 250hz Important area for many as the rhythm come from this range

250hz to 500hz Lower Mid range and cover by many instruments

500hz to 2khz Mid range, defines how prominent an instrument is

2khz - 4 khz Upper Midrange Human ear very sensitive to this spectrum

5khz - 6khz Affects the perception of clarity

6khz - 20khz Affects the perception of brilliance and sparkle and composed of harmonics

Regardless of spec sheets and all. Good speakers try and handling the 60-15khz range well. The more you spend the wider the frequency band gets that they cover well. Based on above how much really benefits what your listening too and lower distortion just as important.
 
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