QUERY: parted magic on NAS

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by andwan0, Sep 12, 2012.

  1. andwan0

    andwan0
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    I have a NAS (DNS-320) which has one physical 500GB HDD.

    Is it possible to re-partition the HDD without wiping it (ie. retaining existing data). I can do this using "Parted Magic" live-CD on a laptop/PC, but not sure how to go about this with a NAS.

    Currently I have one full/large NTFS partition on my NAS, but I would like to create a FAT32 partition.

    Any help very much appreciated

    Cheers
     
  2. bubblegum57

    bubblegum57
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    If you map it as a network drive, see if any partition tool sees it.

    IF. you try over a network, use a cable, even so, networks can just drop out, so it could muck it up.
     
  3. OmniBlade

    OmniBlade
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    This a D-link sharecenter? According to google it formats its disks as some variation of the linux ext filesystems (probably ext3 or 4), not ntfs or fat32. You won't be repartitioning that over the network, you would need to take out the disks put them in a normal system and then run your parted magic disk on them, but I don't see how that would benefit you in any way.
     
  4. maf1970

    maf1970
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    The NAS defaults to EXT3. However, if you read the user guide , there are options to allow it to be used by Apple etc.
    The question is though, why do you need a FAT32 partition ?
     

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