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Q70R - HDR

Miksterek

Standard Member
*sorry for my english*

Hello guys, how can I enable HDR10+ on my TV Samsung QE55Q70R? I think it’s just normal HDR or maybe im wrong. I cant find any settings for that. Im watching Netflix
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zeppelino

Distinguished Member
Hdr10 is the “base” hdr version. Your Q70 is playing hdr correctly via Netflix. Amazon offer some content in hdr10+.
 

Foster1984

Well-known Member
I realise this might make me sound pedantic, but for the benefit of people who might read this thread in the future, I think we need to make the distinction that “HDR10+” and “HDR+” are not the same thing.

HDR10+” is the dynamic metadata version of “HDR10”. It is an actual HDR format.

Whilst, “HDR+” is the name Samsung give to their picture setting, which was designed to make SDR content look like HDR.

It is confusing though, which is why I believe Samsung have now dropped this naming moniker/scheme on their newer models of TV.
 

dots999

Member
Just to double down on Fosters clarification. Did anyone ever test what HDR+ mode does when used on HDR10 content, does it add any kind of scene specific dynamic metadata adjustments i.e. resulting in pseudo HDR10+ similar to LG's Active HDR? Samsung's releases about HDR+ were always cryptic and lacking details but I did wonder whether the mode formed the basis of their HDR10+ concept.
 

Foster1984

Well-known Member
Just to double down on Fosters clarification. Did anyone ever test what HDR+ mode does when used on HDR10 content, does it add any kind of scene specific dynamic metadata adjustments i.e. resulting in pseudo HDR10+ similar to LG's Active HDR?
HDR+ doesn’t read any kind of metadata; as it is designed for SDR content and SDR content doesn’t contain metadata. It was designed to smooth out posterization on SDR content by trying to better match the TV panel’s native colour space.

When used with HDR content, it does that same as it does with SDR content. But this just leads to artifacting, since the algorithm can’t add anything extra to a HDR image except oversaturation.

Samsung's releases about HDR+ were always cryptic and lacking details but I did wonder whether the mode formed the basis of their HDR10+ concept.
They lacked details, because what HDR+ did depended entirely on the content you were watching, it was an algorithm. It kind of shows why Samsung have started to remove it from their TVs. In short, consumers found it confusing.

HDR+ simply is to colour reproduction, what upscaling is to resolution. The key thing to remember is that it is an effect, e.g. additional processing, it is a picture processing "enhancement" nothing more; it doesn’t add anything to the picture that isn’t a guess.

Whereas HDR10+ was a genuine response to Dolby Vision. Because dynamic metadata allows for more effect tone mapping and therefore an improved HDR experience on less capable TVs, because the information can be mapped to the TV’s capabilities rather than static data that might sit outside the TV’s abilities.
 

dots999

Member
Agreed, in SDR it's just trying to create something that isn't there and fails. Samsung in their initial blurb did indicate that it also added something to HDR content that seemed to infer it was doing some additional processing to individual scenes. You can change settings to eliminate some of the more jarring processing and allign it with the regular HDR settings so I was just curious if anyone ever came across any sites where this mode in HDR was actually tested to see what it was doing (if anything). I assume not though.

For reference, below is a section of their press release on HDR+ that specifically mentions enhancements to HDR content around brightness & contrast rather than colour reproduction.

"With HDR native contents, HDR+ also uncovers previously hidden images from darker content scenes, supplementing the level of brightness to express objects hidden in darker shadows. For brighter content scenes, HDR+ increases the level of contrast ratio to differentiate objects from the background, while still depicting more image details on the screen for an overall better picture."

 
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