PS3 wireless fix for BT Homehubs

Discussion in 'Playstation Forums' started by mach25, Jan 7, 2012.

  1. mach25

    mach25
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    I am posting this note as a fix that may help the apparently large number people that are experiencing problems with keeping their PS3 on a wireless network when using BT Homehub wireless routers.

    I’ll relate my experience and if you have the same problem with the same or similar equipment, perhaps this will be of help. I am posting this on the AVforum and Playstation support websites to reach the largest audience possible. I apologise but I am not going to be able to offer further assistance beyond this note.

    I believe I have positively identified that the cause of the problem is the software on the BT Homehub itself as I will explain below. It may help you have some confidence in my diagnosis and resolution to know that I work as the network architect for large UK Company, and that I designed, configured and installed its’ large corporate wireless infrastructure which has been reviewed by Cisco.

    My young son’s PS3 had been having intermittent problems staying attached to our BT Homehub. He had saved up all year and then bought it with his own money – imagine how upset he was when it would no longer connect at all. I admit I am mostly posting this here to help with other parents who have equally distraught children, particularly as some may have been received PS3’s as Christmas presents.

    The connection type is WPA2 (do not use WEP as this is utterly useless for security and if anyone is using it I strongly recommend you change this to WPA or WPA2).

    I read of many similar or identical experiences online and tried what seemed like every PS3-based resolution offered, from factory reset to the simple one of re-entering the wireless key (more times than I could count) – all with no success. I even contacted a PS3 repair company who were unable to help.

    What finally pointed me to the cause and resolution was that nothing else in the house had an issue – laptops, blue ray players (BD Live), iPhones, etc. were all working perfectly.

    I verified that the Homehub had no firewall rules operating on the LAN side, and that I had not blocked any MAC addresses or applied any other rules, and so confirmed that as far as devices on the LAN was concerned, it was an open network. There seemed to be no reason for the PS3 to be unable to connect to the wireless network.

    I then started to look at the Homehub logs. I could see nothing that coincided time-wise with the problems my son was experiencing and then I noticed that new software appears to get downloaded to Homehubs automatically. Furthermore, a new version had appeared at about the time that my sons’ problems began – I could not be sure that this was cause but viewed it as highly suspicious.

    Luckily I had an old Netgear wireless router from a previous ISP. I wanted to prove that the Homehub was the cause and so I started up the Netgear, created a new SSID and key on it (still using the same type of encryption) and then changed the PS3 wireless configuration to associate and authenticate to this instead.

    The result was instant wireless connection from the PS3 to the Netgear. The PS3 had clearly been fully functional all along, and therefore the Homehub was positively identified as the cause.

    My broadband service is BT Infinity and so to replace the BT Homehub I would have to buy a new cable wireless router (as opposed to a standard broadband router). I could have done this, but these are expensive and I suggest that you could do what I did instead to fix this problem.

    I admit you need to have a spare wireless router available but any old G or N wireless router will do. Unless you have huge bandwidth into your home i.e. 100Mb or more, the bandwidth of a 54Mb G band radio will likely exceed your broadband network speed anyway so this is still more than enough for your PS3 to play online.

    Other than that, all you need is a single Ethernet crossover cable that you can buy from any PCWorld or other similar store (they only cost a couple of pounds). Try to make it at least several metres long though as you’ll want as much distance from your BT Homehub and your old wireless router to reduce radio interference as much as possible.

    Once you have this, carry out the following steps:


    • On the BT Homehub, check to find a spare IP address on your LAN. You’ll find this by accessing the web page for the Homehub, click on ‘Settings’ (and enter your password), then ‘Advanced Settings’, then ‘Continue to Advance Settings’, then ‘Home Network’, and then ‘IP Addresses’. You should see a start and end date for the addresses DHCP.
    • Pick a spare IP address that is outside of the DHCP scope. For example, if your DHCP scope starts at 192.168.1.100 and ends at 192.168.1.200, you could pick 192.168.1.99 – just make sure it isn’t the same IP address as the Homehub itself which is shown at the top of the same screen
    • Also record the network mask as you’ll need this (it normally will be something like 255.255.255.0)
    • Get your old wireless router, start it up, and connect your PC (or some other laptop) using an ordinary Ethernet cable, but do NOT connect the old wireless router to the Homehub.
    • After your router has started up, log into it and use your web browser to go to whatever admin page sets the network configuration. (If you can’t remember the password, you may have to factory reset the old wireless router, but this won’t matter – there is nothing you’ll need off it.)
    • On the admin page, find the section where you specify the Local LAN address and enter the IP address you chose in step 2. You’ll also need to enter the network mask you recorded in step 3 at this stage too.
    • There will be a screen where it asks if DHCP should be enabled - turn this OFF.
    • Find the screen where the wireless settings are configured and set a ***new*** SSID. Then chose WPA-PSK (TKIP) or WPA2 for the encryption, and enter a new wireless key for this SSID.
    • You don’t need to configure anything else as you won’t be using the broadband connection.
    • Remember to save these changes
    • Place the old wireless router as far away from the BT Homehub as your crossover cable will allow, and use the crossover cable to connect one end to a spare Ethernet (LAN) port on the old wireless router, and the other end to a spare Ethernet (LAN) port on the BT Homehub (these are usually to be found on the back of the Homehub).
    • Once you have put the cable into both you should now have two operating wireless networks – the original Homehub and the old wireless router.
    • Back to your PS3 now – go to the appropriate wireless configuration screen on the XMB and enter the SSID and wireless key that you created in step 8.

    By doing this, the PS3 should be able to connect to the old wireless network using the new SSID.

    The PS3 should now be able to access the Internet as the old wireless network is now providing the wireless connection, and the BT Homehub is providing the IP connection information via the crossover cable to the old wireless router, which in turns passes it wirelessly onto the PS3.

    This also means that all your other wireless equipment can connect as before using the BT Homehub because only the PS3 is connecting using the old wireless router.

    I will be advising BT of my findings.

    I hope this is of help.
     
  2. Foster

    Foster
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    I have the BT HH3 and have had no problems :p Is this for HH and HH2 ?
     
  3. mach25

    mach25
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    Mine is the Homehub2, but I have seen the issure reported on all 3 versions. Ours did work perfectly for several months, and then started to have difficulty up for no apparent reason (i.e. no changes were made by me to the Homehub), but everything else continued to wirelessly connectnormally. After about 3 weeks or so of being erratic in connecting to the network, it just stopped connecting altogether.

    I also eliminated wireless interference as the cause.
     
  4. NightHawk

    NightHawk
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    If your son plays online it is better to go wired if possible.
     
  5. GokuSS4

    GokuSS4
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    Ive got the homehub 3 wireless n on the 40mb fibre optic and never had issues.
     
  6. Foster

    Foster
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    Like what I have and I've never had any issues either
     

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