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Progressive Scan picture using Computer monitor?

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by DrPepper, Oct 2, 2001.

  1. DrPepper

    DrPepper
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    I have Toshiba SD-P1000 which outputs Progressive Scan.I can not afford plasma or projector so I wish to connect my dvd to computer monitor.

    Can I get Progressive Scan picture using Computer monitor?

    If I can how do I connect component phone(D-connector) out to BNC component video input? Is there a cable to do this?

    Thanks
     
  2. Stuart Wright

    Stuart Wright
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    Since the VGA output of a PC is progressive scan (i.e. non-interlaced), then the answer to your first question is yes.<br />The output from a PC has 5 elements, Red, Green, Blue, Horizontal and Vertical sync.<br />You'll need to convert component to RGB. And that assumes that the monitor will work with the sync on green or however it is extracted from the component outputs.<br />Why would you want to do this, anyway?<br />The cheapest decent 21" monitor is still over £500.
     
  3. Guest

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    why bother connecting your DVD player to a monitor?
    Just play your DVD's via the PC.
     
  4. Stuart Wright

    Stuart Wright
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    Floys has a good point.
    The image quality on a PC monitor from a DVD ROM drive and with DVD player software will be vasty superior to what your stand alone DVD player can produce.
     
  5. Jeff

    Jeff
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    Colour reproduction on standard PC monitors is very poor.

    Jeff
     
  6. DrPepper

    DrPepper
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    Thanks for your all your replays

    Looks like I need to get a plasma or
    projector .I better start saving. :(
     
  7. Mr.D

    Mr.D
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    Colour is OK on mine adjusting overlay gamma is crucial though as most monitors/graphics cards seem to have a straight linear response : you want a bit of a curve out of the blacks and into the whites otherwise flat blacks and clipped harsh whites.

    iiyama pro510 22" but gamma tweaking should apply equally to any monitor. iiyama UK still seem unable or unwilling to tell me where the RGB cut-off and drive adjustments are though which I kinda resent after paying 600quid for the monitor
     
  8. Stuart Wright

    Stuart Wright
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    Mr D - we have the same monitor. How have you set yours? I just ineptly cranked up the brightness and contrast to what looks ok.
    I run it at 1600x1200, BTW.
     
  9. JohnAd

    JohnAd
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    A quick intro to monitor gamma
    http://www.bberger.net/gamma.html

    Note that this applies to the handling of normal windows screen data. For overlays the situation is more complicated but basically it is sometimes possible to adjust for the gamma differences.

    The gamma and the colour temp both effect colour reproduction. A well set up CRT monitor should be as good as any other CRT device as long as the phosphors are close to the correct chromacity points (see Richard's post below)

    Jeff on what do you base your assertion that PC monitors suck?

    John

    [ 09-10-2001: Message edited by: JohnAd ]
     
  10. Jeff

    Jeff
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    Richard,

    Thanks for bailing me out!

    Jeff
     
  11. JohnAd

    JohnAd
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    Richard and Jeff

    Fair enough, this probably does rule out a straight swap out from TV to monitor (i.e. the question being asked)

    The flicker problem will be bad, as Richard metioned, with a normal player.

    But if you are looking at a screen at about 1 to 1.5 screen widths away and can run at higher frequencies (72/75Hz using a HTPC say) I can't see why you would not want to use a PC monitor.

    John
     
  12. RichardA

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    If my response implied that you shouldn't watch video on a PC monitor then I'm sorry - what I was trying to get across is that TV and PC monitors are not equal. As long as you are aware of that, no problem.

    I should say that I am surrounded by half a dozen engineers, working on next generation scalers, and they are virtually all watching DVDs on their PC's monitor with the PC signal on top!

    Richard
     
  13. Mr.D

    Mr.D
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    1600x1200 at 85Hz normally but when watching dvd I switch down to 1024x768 at either 72Hz or more recently 120Hz ( doubt I'll find an affordable pj that will handle that though)

    I squish the picture vertically for 16x9. I actually used the snell and wilcox test patterns on VE for this. Then set brightness and contrast ( 6500K is sorta accurate in the mids but goes way out of whack towards black and white : I checked the same model monitor at work with a colour analyser: incidentally it didn't have a large enough intensity range to meet our requirements for film work whereas a slightly cheaper sony model passed: wouldn't fancy its chances of lasting longer than 6 months even then!)

    You can see the grayscale tracking going way out of whack if you pump the gamma settings for your overlay whilst viewing a ramp in VE.
    Just setting the contrast and brightness gave a very nasty image that exhibits some posterising: blacks that are either completely dead screen or milked up and whites that were way too clippy ( too hard a clip into white)
    varying the gamma a tad firstly allowed me to resolve the below black strip on the pluge in VE and allowed me to keep the contrast at high enough levels but smooth off the transitions into peak white : posterisation also fell of significantly.

    This makes sense as video isn't quite a linear distribution intensity wise unlike CG ( well most CG)

    The colour controls in windvd ( HSI I think) allowed me to tweak out a bit of red overall also but that was a preference and I wouldn't say it made the picture any more accurate.

    Brightness wise I get plenty.
     
  14. RichardA

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    The main difference of note for this kind of application is that a PC monitor has different phosphors to a TV set - the colourimetry of them may be similar but that's about it.

    A PC monitor will be seriously dimmer than a TV set.

    The PC monitor phosphors have a faster decay than a TV set.

    Both of these combined means that you will be much closer to the PC monitor than you would be to an equal size TV set and this will cause flicker perception to increase, so you may well find that you won't want to watch 50Hz material (even if the monitor will lock to it)

    Hope this helps!

    Richard Ansell
    Snell & Wilcox
     

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