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Progressive Scan PAL v NTSC

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Buying & Building' started by Howbury, Oct 8, 2004.

  1. Howbury

    Howbury
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    I recently bought a Philips 32PF9986 LCD television which I am very pleased with. I am now looking for a reasonably cheap DVD Player AIO system to go with it [thinking of waiting another year before getting a HD & DVD Recorder system]. I have looked at the specs of various systems and have identified the Panasonic SCHT520 as a possible. I have been put off systems that have Component output but only with NTSC Progressive Scan which is why I haven't taken the plunge yet.
    However last night it occurred to me that things might not be that bad. VHS videos specify if they are PAL or NTSC but DVDs only specify a Region. So maybe DVDs are neutral and can be processed as PAL or NTSC. In which case maybe I might be able to use Component output with NTSC Progressive Scan on the SCHT520 to display on the 32PF9986.
    Does anyone have any knowledge or experience of this, please ?

    Thanks
    John
     
  2. LV426

    LV426
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    A television signal (whatever method is used to carry it - tape, DVD, transmission) is defined as a given number of lines, and a field refresh rate. This defines the structure of the image.

    NTSC signals have 525 lines of which 480 are used for picture) and a field refresh rate of 60hz.

    PAL is 625 (576) and 50.

    Regardless of any region coding, the signal on all DVDs are one or the other of the above. Europe and Australasia (for example) are PAL territories and (with very few exceptions) DVDs in these markets have the PAL (625/50) structure. North America and Japan have NTSC (525/60).

    So, in fact, the recorded signal on DVDs DOES differ by territory.

    In addition, colour information is added to this structure. On tape and in broadcast, there are specific methods for each territory. These are PAL and NTSC (and also SECAM). On DVDs, colour information isn't PAL or NTSC. But the players, when generating an output create either a PAL or NTSC colour carrier for compatibility with local TVs etc.

    These can be mixed and matched. Normally 625/50 has a PAL colour carrier, and 525/60 has NTSC. But it's quite feasible to create a 525/60/PAL signal. This is used in Brasil (I think) as a national standard. It's also often found as an option on DVD players where it is known as PAL60 or PseudoPAL.

    So, the point is, that whilst colour data on DVDs is standards neutral, the image structure (line and field) isn't.

    All LCD devices are intrinsically progressive by nature. They deal with interlaced video signals for themselves - de-interlacing them (i.e. making them progressive) for display.

    The benefit of using a progressive source is limited to the likelihood that the de-interlacer fitted to (say) a DVD player may well do the job better than the one inside the display.
     
  3. Howbury

    Howbury
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    Many thanks Nigel. That answers my question and more. I now have a much clearer basis for evaluating AIOs

    Regards
    John
     

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