Problem with subwoofer power

RezaD

Novice Member
Hi all
I have two LG active subwoofers:
Down Firing
8-inch cone
150 watts RMS (300 watts Peak)
88 dB/W (1 M)
4 Ohm
35 Hz - 200 Hz


The problem is that if I increase the subwoofer volume by more than half, when I turn up the AV receiver volume, the subwoofer sound is severely destruction.
That's why I have to set the subwoofer volume to half. But at this volume, the subwoofer sound is not that powerful.
To compensate for this problem, I bought another LG subwoofer. The sound is much better than before but still not enough.
Could the reason for this be that the position of the subwoofers is not adjusted?
Or is it because of the low power of LG subwoofers?

The position of the subwoofers is shown in the image below:
 

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gibbsy

Moderator
LG are not reknown for their sub woofers and more than likely at the volume you want to have them is that they are bottoming out. Looking at your room you would be more likely to get a better response from one of the companies that specialise in building subs.

Set up wise we need to know what receiver and it's room calibration system to see if you have EQ'd that correctly into your system. What do you have the crossovers of the speakers set at and their size. With subs in the system you should be looking for a crossover of 80hz with the speakers set to small. Phase on the subs should be set to 0 (zero) initially and their crossover set to it's maximum.
 

RezaD

Novice Member
LG are not reknown for their sub woofers and more than likely at the volume you want to have them is that they are bottoming out. Looking at your room you would be more likely to get a better response from one of the companies that specialise in building subs.

Set up wise we need to know what receiver and it's room calibration system to see if you have EQ'd that correctly into your system. What do you have the crossovers of the speakers set at and their size. With subs in the system you should be looking for a crossover of 80hz with the speakers set to small. Phase on the subs should be set to 0 (zero) initially and their crossover set to it's maximum.
Thanks "gibbsy"
My settings are as you said.
I set the speakers to small, the subwoofer crossover to 80 Hz, and the phase to 0.

My current receiver is LG. Unfortunately my receiver is an old model and does not have settings such as frequency and room calibration.

A question
Which of the following do you suggest?

1- Connecting the LFE channel to the subwoofer and connecting the output of the front speakers directly to the speakers

2- Connecting the output of the front speakers first to the subwoofer and then to the speakers (without connecting the LFE channel to the subwoofer)

3- Connecting the output of the front speakers first to the subwoofer and then to the speakers (along with connecting the LFE channel to the subwoofer)
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Sorry but it seems you have an all in one system and that will be designed to run with just one sub woofer and I cannot get my head around how you have it all set up. If the receiver has speaker connections as well as an LFE output then they should all be connected directly to the receiver.
 

RezaD

Novice Member
Sorry but it seems you have an all in one system and that will be designed to run with just one sub woofer and I cannot get my head around how you have it all set up. If the receiver has speaker connections as well as an LFE output then they should all be connected directly to the receiver.
Not! I will explain now
This is my system (Picture No. 1). One AV receiver, 7 speakers and 2 active subwoofers.
On the back of the subwoofer, there is both a speaker input and output, as well as an LFE input (Picture No. 2). The receiver has only one LFE output, but I connected it to two subwoofers using a 1 to 2 converter.
 

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Last edited:

MI55ION

Distinguished Member
Thanks "gibbsy"
My settings are as you said.
I set the speakers to small, the subwoofer crossover to 80 Hz, and the phase to 0.

My current receiver is LG. Unfortunately my receiver is an old model and does not have settings such as frequency and room calibration.

A question
Which of the following do you suggest?

1- Connecting the LFE channel to the subwoofer and connecting the output of the front speakers directly to the speakers

2- Connecting the output of the front speakers first to the subwoofer and then to the speakers (without connecting the LFE channel to the subwoofer)

3- Connecting the output of the front speakers first to the subwoofer and then to the speakers (along with connecting the LFE channel to the subwoofer)

Option 1 is the ideal standard method.

Options 2 and 3 are not recommended.
 

MI55ION

Distinguished Member
Thanks "MI55ION"
What do you think about the post at the beginning of the topic?

Its probably a combination of the low power sub, limited frequency response along with the size of the room and your seating location.

If the sub is distorting before reaching the volume that you like, it means the sub is not powerful enough for your needs. If you are stuck with the subs, you could try moving them and/or your seating location as these two factors have a significant effect on overall bass response and intensity.

If you want to get more involved, to measure you would need to obtain a USB mic and REW software. If your room is square or rectangular you could use just the room simulator within REW to get a better idea of sub response. It all depends how committed you can be.

I appreciate options are probably limited for you due the ridiculous sanctions imposed on your country.
 

RezaD

Novice Member
Its probably a combination of the low power sub, limited frequency response along with the size of the room and your seating location.

If the sub is distorting before reaching the volume that you like, it means the sub is not powerful enough for your needs. If you are stuck with the subs, you could try moving them and/or your seating location as these two factors have a significant effect on overall bass response and intensity.

If you want to get more involved, to measure you would need to obtain a USB mic and REW software. If your room is square or rectangular you could use just the room simulator within REW to get a better idea of sub response. It all depends how committed you can be.

I appreciate options are probably limited for you due the ridiculous sanctions imposed on your country.
Bravo. How brief, useful and accurate you explained. A complete answer. It was also interesting to me that you mentioned my limited circumstances. I would be grateful if you could comment on my other topics and guide me.
 

MI55ION

Distinguished Member
Bravo. How brief, useful and accurate you explained. A complete answer. It was also interesting to me that you mentioned my limited circumstances. I would be grateful if you could comment on my other topics and guide me.

One other thing which I forgot you should try is: take turns with each sub and see which side (left or right) sound best. Then stack the sub on top of each other as this should give a plus 3-6db gain and offer a little more headroom. Also corner loading the sub often adds a little more output (free bass they call it) but you may need an outboard eq device such as antimode or minidsp to tame the peaks this may create.
 

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