Question Problem with Buffalo Linkstation NAS

Davemazo

Active Member
I have two NAS drives loaded up with photos, some ripped films, etc, etc. These are quite old a Diskstation DS211 and a Buffalo Linkstation (not sure of the model).
Until recently they both worked fine when I wanted to access them from my PC. They were both mapped so I can access them via Windows File Explorer.
Recently access to the Buffalo suddenly stopped from my PC, the Diskstation works fine. I can also access both from my smart TVs and my Android devices.
I can get to the Buffalo if I type the ip address into my browser to look at the settings etc but I don't seem to be able to access the files on there.
I read somewhere that Windows 10 doesn't support SMB (whatever that is) any more but in the Buffalo settings SMB and FTP are both ticked. Also SMB is ticked in Windows network settings.
Whenever I now turn on my Nas drives I can't see the Buffalo in Windows (they are normally turned off, as is my PC, until I need them). If I try to delete the existing path in File Explorer it locks up my PC for a couple of minutes. If I try to remap the Buffalo to File Explorer I get an error saying it can't find the path or it already exists.
At the moment it's working after I repeatedly tried to delete then remap the Buffalo, (not sure what I did) but I know that when I turn everything off I will be back to square one. I can't leave it all on because I get complaints about the noise, the wife and kids claim to have sensitive hearing and can't sleep at night because of the buzzing, vibrating etc.
I'm sure it's not a fault with the NAS or HDDs in there because when it is working (on my PC)it works fine so it must be something to with Windows.
I hope I've explained the problem clearly enough.
 

rpr

Active Member
Have you mapped it using Buffalo's NAS Navigator?
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
There's now several versions of CIFS/SMB (two names for the same thing.) If your server is using an older version, you may need to tell newer versions of Windows to also load up the older version(s) of SMB. Newer versions of Windows are increasingly turning off the older SMB version because of their incumbent security flaws,
 
Last edited:

leasty

Standard Member
If the Buffalo only supports the old SMB 1.0 protocol, then you need to enable that on your Windows 10 machines. Run Control panel, go to "Programs", then under "Programs and Features" select "Turn Windows Features on or off". Scroll down to, and then expand "SMB 1.0/CIFS File sharing support", then select "SMB 1.0/CIFS Client". Select "OK" and let Windows do its thing and I suggest a restart to be sure..
Only issue is that SMB1.0 does have a lot of security loopholes which is why Microsoft disable it by default.
Good luck.
 

Davemazo

Active Member
Thanks leasty that has improved things slightly. There were three options under "SMB 1.0/CIFS File sharing support"
"SMB 1.0/CIFS Automatic Removal"
"SMB 1.0/CIFS Client"
"SMB 1.0/CIFS Server"

All 3 were ticked so I unticked the 1st and 3rd options and left the 2nd one ticked, restarted both PC and NAS and it has now made it easier to connect to the NAS. The original mapping in File Explorer does not work so I have to disconnect (which it does without locking up my PC for 5 minutes) and then remap the NAS, and everything works.
It's a start and at least I'm not locking up my PC when I try to access the NAS.
Thanks again.

What are the security loopholes. Does it mean someone can access the NAS and delete everything or is it more serious. If its just the former then there's nothing on there that isn't backed up or not important
 

rpr

Active Member

Davemazo

Active Member
Thanks. I bought it secondhand from this very forum so I've never had a manual. I have downloaded it however but it doesn't really help.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
What are the security loopholes. Does it mean someone can access the NAS and delete everything or is it more serious. If its just the former then there's nothing on there that isn't backed up or not important

I've not researched it, but it's almost certainly not something that would concern the average SOHO system builder who tend to run their systems with very lapse if any "internal" security. Generally SOHO users run their systems with everything open to anyone connected to the local network. It's more likely to be something of concern corporate system managers who (for example) have to ensure the HR's data isn't visible to Finance, the Directorate is not visible to Marketing and so on.

It won't be exposing anything to users outside your network (on the Internet) - that would require you to make changes to the firewall rules on your router.
 

Davemazo

Active Member
Thanks Mick. As you've probably gathered I'm no expert when it comes to networking and the security of it.
I hope I'm doing as much as I can by setting strong passwords, only allowing admin (me) to alter or delete files and by having my routers firewall on.
I would though like to be able to allow my daughters who live away to be able to access films stored on my NAS which I suppose could make it less secure. If only I knew how to do it that is.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
I would though like to be able to allow my daughters who live away to be able to access films stored on my NAS which I suppose could make it less secure. If only I knew how to do it that is.

In the UK, that's probably a Copyright violation, unless it's your home movies.

It's technically possible of course. VPN's would be my weapon of choice to secure it. ("Proper" VPN's, not Nord et al.) Though I wouldn't been keen to use SMB/CIFS/NFS to stream over long distances, I'd prefer to use something a bit more robust about transporting media over an unreliable infrastructure such as the public Internet and be web browser based, akin to what YouTube et al use.

For the amount of money and hassle it would cost to build and maintain it, it might be cheaper, simpler and legal to just buy them a NetFlix subscription.
 

Davemazo

Active Member
Thanks again Mick. I know if somebody who uses Plex to do it and I just thought I'd have a go for something to do. Like I said I have no idea how to do it and am well aware it is beyond my capabilities. With your explanation you have doubly confirmed that I would give up after 5 minutes.
They already have their own Netflix, Disney+, and Amazon prime subscriptions so my little project would be massive overkill.
Thanks for putting me off though and saving me from wasting my time 👍
 

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