Probably daft question about MP3 file sizes

Discussion in 'Headphones, Earphones & Portable Music' started by Chris1234, Mar 9, 2006.

  1. Chris1234

    Chris1234
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Hi All,

    I have ripped all my CDs onto my hard drive in MP3 format. When I look at the files in WMP or iTunes, they appear to be about 3 to 4Mb each.

    Therefore, I would've expected to be able to fit roughly 200 tracks onto a 700Mb CD-R. This would also fit with the approx 1,000 tracks that I can fit on a 4Gb ipod mini. In reality, it will only take about 20 tracks.

    Does anyone know why? Am I missing something incredibly obvious??

    Cheers,

    Chris.
     
  2. WelshBluebird

    WelshBluebird
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2005
    Messages:
    2,511
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    86
    Location:
    Rhondda
    Ratings:
    +135
    because usually when you burn music cd, you burn an audio cd which is playable in nearly all cd players. These discs do not use the digital file size to determine how many songs can go on the cd, but use time - usually its around 80 minutes of music on a 700mb cd.
     
  3. rich1068

    rich1068
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2005
    Messages:
    145
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +4
    Very, very low bit rate...? :rolleyes:
     
  4. callidus

    callidus
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Not sure I understand what you're asking.

    When you rip a CD to mp3 format they should be approx 3-4 Mb. They could also be upto 9ishMb depending on the bit rate you used. Normal MP3's have a bit rate of about 128kbps some up to 196kbps.

    If you rip the files from the CD to a standard audio format ( .wav for example) they have an size of approx 10Mb/min of song play.
     
  5. WelshBluebird

    WelshBluebird
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2005
    Messages:
    2,511
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    86
    Location:
    Rhondda
    Ratings:
    +135
    if I understood it correctly, he was confused because each mp3 on his computer was around 3/4meg (average 3.5meg) so on a 700MB audio cd, he thought you could have around 200 songs.
    But, when burning an audio cd, the capacity is measured in minutes (usually 80) and not megabytes - hence why he can only get around 20 songs per cd.
     
  6. callidus

    callidus
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Ah ok. You're right though.

    The only way around this is to buy a CD player that will play mp3's :smashin:
     
  7. Happytab

    Happytab
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2005
    Messages:
    261
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +2
    You can burn the 200 songs if you change your settings in Itunes to burn an MP3 Cd not an adio CD.
     
  8. BenW

    BenW
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2005
    Messages:
    888
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Stansted
    Ratings:
    +17
    But that will only work if the cd player will read an MP3 disk
     
  9. steve-p

    steve-p
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2006
    Messages:
    286
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +7
    Lots do nowadays. The audio system in both my cars will, for example. In fact, one of them will play mp3s off a dual layer DVD, and that's a lot of music :)
     
  10. Maidenpriest

    Maidenpriest
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2005
    Messages:
    238
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +8

    196kbps is a low bitrate to me, mp3's do go higher, i think 320kbps is considered to be cd quality!
     
  11. KJ_Palmer

    KJ_Palmer
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Some people (eg. Naxos.com) consider 64kbps to be 'near' CD quality... :(
     
  12. Toasty

    Toasty
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2004
    Messages:
    13,125
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    167
    Location:
    Staffs
    Ratings:
    +4,530
    Some would argue only lossless could be considered CD quality.
     
  13. kevH

    kevH
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Messages:
    833
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Location:
    Live Leeds Work Chesterfield
    Ratings:
    +37
    i would argue your ears are the only true test of CD quality !!:rotfl:
     
  14. steve-p

    steve-p
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2006
    Messages:
    286
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +7
    It depends on what equipment you are playing it back on, but the LAME VBR encoding is very good at around 250kbps.

    I am always sceptical of people claiming that any mp3 is 'CD quality' even at 320kpbs, since mp3 encoding does not have a flat frequency response anyway. However, the tradeoff between size and quality is something which concerns only the people using the files. If it sounds good how you use it, then it is good, simple as that.

    Also even lossless encoding is not perfect unless you use something like Exact Audio Copy to ensure you aren't getting errors from the disc when you rip it. It's surprising that some 15 year old discs can be error free, and some brand new ones can have plenty of errors. Age and condition do not seem to be the factor they might be. With a disc with errors on it, ripped with EAC to avoid the errors, a lossless format could actually be better than CD quality in that on a CD player, it would not filter out the errors on the disc.
     
  15. PJTX100

    PJTX100
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2004
    Messages:
    8,143
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Ratings:
    +564
    In answer to the original question, and agreeing with Happytab, I suspect that an audio CD is being created which presumable converts the mp3s back to WAV - ie you get the worst of both worlds - compressed sound quality and big files! Best to burn an MP3 data CD. And if your player can't read these, either buy one that does or buy a digital MP3 player!
     
  16. steve-p

    steve-p
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2006
    Messages:
    286
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +7
    Errr... didn't we already cover all that :)
     

Share This Page

Loading...