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Prestige Best films of the 00's year by year!!

Discussion in 'Movie Forum' started by lucasisking, Sep 11, 2017.

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    1. lucasisking

      lucasisking
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      Off we go with a new decade, and new century...

      While @theprestige puts the final touches on his choice (think I can guess) I'll get the ball rolling.

      As per previous threads:
      Prestige Best films of the 70’s year by year

      Prestige Best films of the 80’s year by year

      Prestige Best films of the 90’s year by year !!

      RULES:

       
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    2. lucasisking

      lucasisking
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      2000 for me starts with my favourite British film:


      Sexy Beast
      - Jonathan Glazer

      “Where there's a will - and there is a ****ing will - there's a way - and there is a ****ing way”

      upload_2017-9-11_15-14-33.jpg


      This deliciously re-watchable classic managed to elude me until 2014, when I caught the last half on telly one day. I ordered the blu ray immediately when the credits rolled.

      What can I say, not just a great story brilliantly directed and structured- blackly comedic, brutal and smart- but also a feast of characterisation and rich dialogue scenes. Ray Winstone superbly plays the role of ex con Gal who has found true happiness in the tremendous, boiling, roasting, glorious Spanish sun, with the love of his life Deedee (Amanda Redman) and his best mates Aitch and Jackie. Fandabbydozy. His life of crime in '****hole' England with its glum people and grey weather is just a memory, and all he has to worry about now is what to order from the local tapas restaurant. However... when a boulder comes crashing down into the tranquil blue water of his villa swimming pool, it heralds the arrival of someone he hoped he'd never hear from again...

      upload_2017-9-11_15-14-52.jpg

      The metaphor is heavy handed, but effective. Immediately you notice the effect on Gal (excellent acting by Winstone here) when the news hits; painful reminders of prison "no risk? 8 years of my ****ing life, no risk?" and the panic of having his perfect world shattered- just like the tiles of his ruined swimming pool. Ben Kingsley's Don Logan, sent to persuade Gal to return to London for 'one more job' (a stunningly audacious bank vault heist) is one of the most complex and thoroughly engrossing villains I've ever seen. Logan is literally a human boulder barrelling down to shatter his tranquillity, and he’s not someone to **** with. A paranoid, capricious, volatile bully, but with a child-like sense of loneliness. His psychological attacks however are relentless, how he tries to dismantle Gal by insulting his lifestyle, his weight, his wife, wearing him down while offering himself as a sympathetic solution to his 'problems', like some kind of criminal saviour. Each rebuttal is met with bitter recrimination as though Logan is the victim, prompting further abuse. Gal simply cannot reason with him.

      upload_2017-9-11_15-15-8.jpg

      Kingsley is a tour de force; a role unlike anything we’ve seen him attempt before, and he achieves it with a performance that is expressionate, physical and verbose. Yet he isn't the only memorable player here; further up the food chain is also Ian McShane's suave sociopath and crime boss Teddy Bass; who is just as impressive; arguably more so. While Don is mouthy, mercurial and explosive, Teddy is calm, quiet and hides his intentions behind a gleaming smile or deadpan stare. You realise that even Logan is merely a means to an end for Bass: “if I cared, Gal… If I gave a solitary ****…” It’s a charismatic but icy cold, chilling performance. It’s interesting to note that McShane and Kingsley never share a single scene together (I wonder if that’s significant), but their presence in all their individual scenes is so commanding you cant take your eyes off the screen when they're on.

      upload_2017-9-11_15-15-24.jpg

      Each scene crackles with energy and nervous tension, as though every interaction is a game of mental chess and unspoken threat. It's also replete with quirky humour (the plane scene is one of my favourites). Fracturing the timeline and having dialogue scenes intercut between separate narrators is one of many other stylistic flourishes Glazer adds, along with surrealist touches such as the vaguely Lynchian gun-toting ‘man in the rabbit suit’, and it all adds up to one of the most gleefully re-watchable films. I think it’s a genuine masterpiece of style and substance.



      Runner up:

      American Psycho - Mary Harron

      upload_2017-9-11_15-13-44.jpg


      "Don't just look at it. Eat it"

      A black comedy based on a novel by Bret Easton Ellis, delving into the messed-up mind of a handsome young Manhattan executive in a spectacularly eccentric central performance from Christian Bale. I rediscovered this fairly recently and found it a joy to revisit and to re-watch over and over.

      In a world of utter superficiality and one-upmanship, Bateman is a shallow, image obsessed misogynist- who enjoys dining out, Huey Lewis… and killing people. He becomes increasingly confused about his identity and also murderously envious of his peers- all of whom are as vacuous as he is. Presenting a world where business cards, restaurant reservations and workout routines are so important everyone becomes homogenous, it’s a biting satire of 80s excess and yuppie culture, combined with a study of schizophrenia and psychotic tendencies.

      As the film goes on the line between reality and psychosis becomes hopelessly blurred, and the events of the film are increasingly open to interpretation. Is some of what transpires just in his head? Is all of it? Is he the success story he thinks he is, or just a wannabe? There’s plenty to scrutinize and dissect making this a wonderful slice of early 2000s cinema, and one of a series of brilliant mystery thrillers from the early part of that decade.


      Best of the rest:

      upload_2017-9-11_15-14-1.png

      Erin Brockovich - Steven Soderbergh's bio of a working mum who exposes a negligent pharmaceutical company has a fantastically feisty central performance from Julia Roberts. You don't need Wonder Woman for your female empowerment fix: Erin is your gal. Albert Finney has a lovely supporting role as her exasperated boss with whom she forms a bond of mutual fondness and respect.

      Unbreakable - Shaymalan's remarkable sophomore feature is a dark and breathtakingly unique spin on the comic-book genre. Intelligent, ambitious fiction from when the filmmaker was in his prime.

      Requiem for a Dream - Darren Aronofsky's unbearably bleak study of addiction and mental illness is a harrowing but compelling watch. It’s a grim spiral into darkness and destruction with a phenomenal performance from Ellen Burstyn.

      Memento - Chris Nolan's breakout film and still one of his best. Very cleverly structured and I love the way it unravels.

      Almost Famous - A tender, sweet, feel-good film but with a mild undercurrent of cynicism and heartbreak, based loosely on Cameron Crowe's real life experiences interviewing 70s rock bands. Things I like about the film are the seventies rock vibe, nicely captured by the music and hippy-chic costumes. Kate Hudson and Billy Crudup are great.

      Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon - Ang Lee's willowy romantic adventure. The shine has worn off slightly, but it’s an impressive production and I completely fell in love with Zyang Zi.

      The Beach – Hard to imagine a more ‘year 2000’ movie than this: 90s era Dicaprio, All-Saints & Moby soundtrack, and Virginie Ledoyen (FHM magazine!). It’s still an enjoyable ‘young people having an experience’ tale with a great central performance from Leo DiCaprio.

      Snatch - Another stonking, dialogue-rich guns & geezers flick from Guy Ritchie. Big Bricktop fan “you’re on thin ****ing ice, my pedigree chums”.

      Castaway - Wilsonnnn!!


      Honourable mentions:

      Meet the parents, Pitch Black, Hollow Man, Ginger Snaps, Gladiator, Titan AE, Final Destination, Battle Royale
       
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    3. Wildkarrde

      Wildkarrde
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      Hated by some going by previous remarks but i love it....

      [​IMG]

      "My name is Maximus Decimus Meridius, commander of the Armies of the North, General of the Felix Legions, loyal servant to the true emperor, Marcus Aurelius. Father to a murdered son, husband to a murdered wife. And I will have my vengeance, in this life or the next.

      Gladiator

      Swords and Sandals epic from Ridley Scott that really pushed Russell Crowe to the forefront as an action guy.
      The action just oozed from the beginning, scenes in Germania fighting the Barbarians "At my signal, unleash hell!"

      [​IMG]

      To the Gladiator battles themselves -

      [​IMG]

      But without any shadow of a doubt the best part of Gladiator is Joaquin Phoenix as the deranged Commodus. He truly steals the show and delivers a role i've yet to see him better.

      [​IMG]

      [​IMG]

      The ending is predictable and clichéd but by the time it comes you don't really care as you're immersed in it and happy with how it goes.

      Of course filming this seen the last of Oliver Reed who tragically passed away during filming so he was GCI'd for a part of it. I guess it was rather fitting that as Proximo he delivered one final hurrah in an Oscar winning film.

      upload_2017-9-11_15-52-45.jpeg

      RIP
       
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    4. theprestige

      theprestige
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      Properly strong start there (and some hilarious quotes!) :D with a couple of films I really admire, particularly the latter.

      Completely agreed about McShane in Sexy Beast. Kingsley gets most of the praise and understandably so, but McShane as you rightly pointed out is just as intriguing.

      American Psycho might be the funniest film I have ever seen in my entire life. That film makes me laugh far more than any Judd Apatow or Farrelly Bros film can. :thumbsup:
       
    5. theprestige

      theprestige
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      You know, as far as latter Ridley Scott goes, it's one of his better ones, I reckon.

      Sure it's mostly silly cliched machismo, but at least the film actually takes you on a journey and like you said, Pheonix makes for a fun villain.
       
    6. Wildkarrde

      Wildkarrde
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      @lucasisking

      Seems you're jumping a year here -
      In Theaters:
      Jan 12, 2001

      Better go back and write something else :laugh:
       
    7. lucasisking

      lucasisking
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      Lol. Not on your nelly!
       
    8. Wildkarrde

      Wildkarrde
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      I forgot to add his " I'm feeling vexed" scene, was very funny :)
       
    9. theprestige

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      Ah yes, this is something we touched upon in an earlier thread. I think the 00's is a decade where most of us can remember specifically when we went to see certain films. There are two films I have in my list that imdb says was released in the year before they were officially available to see in the UK. They take into account the hundreds of film festivals that the film would have be shown at.

      For example, my 2001 pick is listed as 2000 on imdb all because it was shown at a Swiss film festival, but the reality is it wasn't released here in the UK until January 2001.

      What i'm saying is that certain films are going to be problematic, but I say just use your instincts. If the imdb lists the film as a 2006 release but you know in your heart it was not available in your country until 2007, I won't see that as an issue.
       
    10. systemsdead

      systemsdead
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      Dancer in the Dark (2000) Directed by Lars Von Trier
      f2f4afc481263d01a8d684c4c52edc6a.png
      Winner of the 2000 Palm d’Or, Trier again turned another genre on its head and had viewers spinning with joy and bemusement this was an entirely different kind of musical this was much darker and more despairing than anything that had gone before.Like his previous movies this packs one emotional punch one after another, and again Trier doesnt take the Hollywood route instead he opts for filming it entirely on digital video with no tracking or dolly shots just static camera placement which in places had more than 100 camera’s placed at various scenes capturing a wealth of angles and movement.
      1311.jpg
      Its story revolves around Selma (Bjork) a Czech immigrant working the blue collar factories U.S.A she works every hour she can but she is suffering daily as she realises that she is loosing her eyesight and gradually going blind, this blindness she suffers is hereditary and will be passed on to her young son, this is why she works saving up enough for an operation for her son…., its story gets darker and darker as things progress and becomes heartbreaking watching Selma go through these chain of events knowing full well this isn’t going to end on a happy note, if you get emotional at films this one will absolutely leave you in shreds.
      maxresdefault.jpg
      A very special mention needs to go to Bjork and the music she hears and plays out in her imagination she is absolutely amazing in this film the way she portrays emotion on every level here is staggering she is Selma and no other could have played it quite like this, she is The Dancer in the Dark and carries every scene with such innocent and intense vulnerability.Another fantastic offering from Trier and one thats ending as haunted me for years.

      Runners up

      In The Mood For Love - Wong Kar-wai Beautiful Blu Ray fans should lap this one up
      Requiem For a Dream - Darren Aronofsky A real gut punch that will never leave you
      Wercmeister Harmonies - Bela Tarr A great introduction to anyone new to Bela Tarr
      Code Unknown - Michael Haneke Immaculate filmmaking from a master
      Amores Perros - Alejandro Inarritu Dog lovers stay away, eat your heart out Crash fans
      Traffic - Steven Soderbergh Great film also a great TV series

      Some acclaimed movies that i really need to see from 2000
      Yi Yi
      Malena
      Girlfight
      Last Resort
       
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    11. theprestige

      theprestige
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      Is it fair to say that Lars Von Trier is one of your favourite filmmakers then? He's popped up a couple of times in your lists. This has been recommended to me on many occasions but I haven't seen it but it sounds quite a devastating emotional experience. The idea of going blind is one of my greatest fears ):
       
    12. systemsdead

      systemsdead
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      Yep he’s definitely sits somewhere in my top 5 all time directors only a couple of films from him I just couldn’t get fully involved in at the time Dogville and Manderlay but hope to catch up on them again soon though.
       
    13. QuestShield

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      This. Can't really add to this goodness from Lucas, both my choice for 2000 too, except I'll probably throw in as a runner up O Brother, Where Art Thou?, remember loving it but haven't watched it in ages. I'm a Dapper Dan man!
       
    14. theprestige

      theprestige
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      2000: Memento (Christopher Nolan)

      [​IMG]

      I imagine that this was the film @lucasisking was referring to. I mean it has to be the number 1 film of 2000. In many ways it's like a spiritual sequel to The Matrix as far as film going experiences are concerned. But truth be told, i've exhausted my thoughts about this film and I imagine I can't be the only person who loves it that much so, at this point, I would rather read another member's thoughts/review on it as everybody who's seen me post about Memento knows what i'm going to say.

      Instead, I will talk about my runner up, a film I consider to have a big impact on me, albeit in a completely different way.

      Runner Up: Ginger Snaps (John Fawcett & Karen Walton)

      [​IMG]

      "Out by 16 or dead on the scene, but together forever"

      Joss Whedon's Buffy The Vampire Slayer often alluded to the fact that high school was hell on earth - literally what with the Sunnydale school being on the hellmouth. But what was even more evident was how Whedon suggested that high school was even more hellish for females in particular. Whedon had grown disappointed and frustrated with horror films, especially the depiction of female characters.

      When speaking about the origin of the Buffy concept, you'll often find Whedon saying he wanted to take the cliched 'hot blonde victim' and turn her into a kick ass action figure, turning the formula on it's head a little. With Buffy he also found the horror element in the nightmare of teenage girls (and sometimes boys) trying to figure out who they were. Canadian director John Fawcett took a similar approach with Ginger Snaps, a Canadian horror film that's sharp, quirky reinterpretation of the werewolf myth.

      [​IMG]

      The synopsis is basically about a pair of 14-15 year old sisters, social outcasts who are attracted to the morbid and the disturbing things in life by which they pride themselves on. Then one night, the slightly older sister survives an attack from a certain big hairy beast thing whilst simultaneously commencing her journey to adolescence.

      What's interesting about Fawcett's Ginger Snaps is that unlike similarily themed teen werewolf films (Teen Wolf, The Beast Within) it is told from a distinctively female perspective. Yes, Fawcett directed and co wrote it but it was Karen Walton came up with the concept and wrote a majority of the script. It is a horror film that's based on very human(ish) relationships and young girls growing up. Whedon did the same thing with Buffy, but that was television. I hadn't really seen a horror film go to the depths and use genre tropes to show the vulnerabilities young girls in such a light and what they have to endure growing up.

      [​IMG]

      After the attack, the films charts the next 28 days in Ginger's life. When Ginger first starts to see changes in her body, they are disturbingly similar to what every 15 -16 year-old girl would go through during adolences. But as the film progresses, it becomes apparent that she is transforming into a big hairy nasty lycanthrope. This is where the film grows even more fascinating as Fawcett and Walton go out of their way to use the mythical notion of werewolf transformation as a deliberating over the boundaries of "ordinary" and strange experiences of adolescences. Not new, I know, but never done in a way that was so riveting and emotionally engaging.

      The thing that mostly affected me, that stayed with me, however, were the increasingly deterioating relationship between Ginger and her younger sister Brigitte. Brigitte's interpretation of her sister's sexual blossoming carries with it a sense of abandonment and loneliness. The earlier transformation scenes in which Ginger complains about period pains along with being checked out by the jocky high school sleaze Jason demonstrate that her sexual maturity is already breaking the bond they so once prided themselves on. Emily Perkins' is quietly heartbreaking here as her wide innocent eyes observes the physical (and social) transformations her sister goes. Much like Veronica in David Cronenberg's The Fly, Bridgette has to bear witness to the breakdown of a loved one's body as she does everything in her power to prevent it from happening. Brigitte had always been an outsider, but back then she always had her sister. Now she's

      [​IMG]

      I don't know if any of you lot have read Barbara Creed's The Monstrous Feminine, but when I did film studies, we were able to link Creed's theories with Ginger Snaps, and that's how I realised how truly psychoanalytical and layered this film was. Creed's theories work by being linked to philosopher Julia Kristeva's concept of the abject. If Bridgette and Ginger and miserable and depressed human figures then they fit perfectly into Kristeva's abject theory. The abject is also considered to be a motherly figure who refuses to let go of her hold of her daughters and their bodily functions. In this case, Ginger and Brigitte's mother (an wonderfully sparky Mimi Rogers) can be considered abject due to her being a paradigm of that. But then, I figured that everybody experiences abjection from time to time.

      I know I keep referring to Buffy a lot but I feel the parallels are impossible to ignore. Buffy also dealt with the issue with a teenager, at the onset of puberty, discovers she's 'not human'. In that sense, she is no different to Ginger. These are female characters who are amongst the line of powerful contemporary horror protagonists who's sexuality is linked to extreme measures of violence. There is a scene later on in the film that highlights it. "I get this ache...and I thought it was for sex but it is to tear everything into fudgeing pieces".

      [​IMG]

      A lot of people question whether or not Ginger Snaps is a feminist film. Me personally, I take such labels with a grain of salt, and the word has far too many negative connotations these days to engage in a respectable discussion. I do, however, feel that there are enough Freudian references and fairly explicit references to the vagina detenta to suggest that it is film that wants you to understand the plight of growing up a young woman and make you sympathise with the fragility of female relationships, even if it was directed by a bloke. I mean, much of Ginger's aggression is targeted at males, especially ones she claims are sexually attracted to her sister.

      Ginger Snaps is a film I had to warm up to. I first caught it on some Sky channel back in the early 00's. It seemed interesting but nothing earth shattering. I then watched it again on DVD maybe a year later and was much more impressed with it, having watched it in it's entirety. We then watched it in a studies class where it was presented in a more appropriate way with a decent speaker system and felt it was a revelation. The score by Mike Shields in particular stood out even more and is one of my favourite scores in cinema. It perfectly adds to the tone of the film with it's haunting gothic vibes, aurally hypnotic.

      [​IMG]

      Despite the mythical analogies, the film does a far better job at depicting teenage angst than that flippin' TV show where all the FIFTEEN year old characters used suspiciously long words *cough* Dawson's Creek *cough*

      Both Fawcett and Walton are probably now best known for developing the tv series Orphan Black, but this is a beautiful film and definitely deserves a wider audience.
       
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    15. domtheone

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      Winner
      [​IMG]
      I've not seen Thirteen days for a few years but I can't not put it as my fave film of 2000.

      I watched it umpteen times after it's release.

      An account of the political activity leading up and during the Cuban Missile crisis of 1962.

      Roger Donaldson (fave of mine - directed some cracking movies) directs Steven Kulp (Bobby Kennedy, Bruce Greenwood (John F Kennedy) and Kevin Costner (Kenny O'Donnell) in this tense political drama.

      Acting is first rate all round (imo). Costner's accent may be off (from what i've read) but since I don't know why, it didn't bother me:D

      Heavy on dialogue with sporadic action scenes, the film charts the course of how the USA/Russia play a game of cat and mouse, calling each others bluff, until the other one blinks.

      Given that my history is terrible, once gain, I'm not 100% sure how accurately the movie follows true events, but it's a cracking story.

      Runner Up
      [​IMG]

      I did think about placing this as my number 1, as Julia Roberts performance alone, could have been enough to put it there.

      She's outstanding (really really), as the single mother who becomes a legal assistant (to Ed Masry - brilliant turn by Albert Finney) and fights a power company, accused of polluting the water supply.

      Fantastic.


      Honourable Mentions;
      Gladiator - Top movie from Ridley. Years back I would have put this at No 1 but have cooled on it a tad. Needs a rewatch.
      The Beach - Great early effort from Danny Boyle. Caprio with another performance that would show hints of his future greatness.
      X-Men - One of the best X-men movies.
      Pitch Black - Budget Horror. Way back when Vin Diesel made good movies.
      Final Destination - Spawned numerous sequels but the orignal probably the best.
      The Perfect Storm - Wolfgang Petersen again with this good (but flawed) movie out on the Ocean.
      Traffic - Brilliant multi weaving story from Steven Soderbergh. Awesome cast. On another day, could have been my no 1.
      Crouching Tiger - Ang Lee and some crazy sword fighting in trees.
      Space Cowboys - Massive Guilty pleasure, awesomely feel good movie. Great cast.
      Memento - Nolan. Enough said.
       
    16. systemsdead

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      @domtheone Totally forgot about The Perfect Storm and Pitch Black I used to get a lot of entertainment out of those two, good calls :smashin:

      @theprestige I’m gonna crack on with Ginger Snaps I don’t remember much about it except at the time it never left really left a mark on me, but people seem to appreciate a lot more these days so a second chance is definitely on the cards.:smashin:
       
    17. theprestige

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      Yeah I reckon it's one of those films that takes at least a couple of proper viewings to appreciate. I too watched it 3 times before I realised how wonderful it was.

      Unfortunately, it's not out on blu ray yet and the DVDs are not very good, picture wise ): I hope that won't spoil your enjoyment of the film.
       
    18. J.J.GITTES

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      Amores Perros(Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu)

      [​IMG]


      I guess that when the 2010 decade roles around in a few years time Inarritu will feature heavily with his one-two sucker punch of Birdman and The Revenant, two films I like but don't love so it's a good place to start for noughties with my favourite Inarritu film and it was a joy revisiting it the other night for this thread.

      The film is three stories interwoven showing different classes of life, how a single car crash effects each story, and how dogs are a major part of there live's, the stories break down like this...

      Octavio and Susana

      The film starts with the working class as we see Octavio (Gael Garcia Bernal) in a high speed chase with his dog in the back seat covered in blood from a gun shot, flashback as we see that Octavio has a hand in illegal dog fighting which he got involved in trying to make some extra green so he can run away with Susana (Vanessa Bauche) and save her from the miserable life she has with his brother Ramiro (Marco Perez), but things don't all go to plan as Ramiro past catches up with him and he and Susana run away leaving Octavio lost and alone.

      Daniel and Valeria

      The second segment is about the upper class, Valeria (Goya Toledo) is the model everyone wants, she is drop dead gorgeous and has it all, Daniel (Alvaro Guerrero) has just left his wife and two kids to be with Valeria, he has just got the flash apartment and a breath of fresh air in his life and the most beautiful women in the country on his arm, but tragedy strikes when Valeria is involved a horrific accident, her leg is severely injured, and one complication leads to another and her life is turned up side down from that very moment.

      El Chivo and Maru

      In the third segment we are homeless, El Chivo (Emilio Echevarria) who is briefly seen in the other two segments is homeless, a revolutionary-turned-squatter who has lost his wife and kids, on the side to make money he is a gun for hire, one day he gets approached by a man to kill his business part, when he accepts the job he adds his own brutal twist to the murder plan that may just change his life forever.

      I am not trying to give to much away as the fun(if you can call it that) is seeing it all play out, and if you are worried about seeing it after seeing the misery porn of 21 Grams or the utter pretentious bullsh*t that is Babel then fear not, this is the film both them two wished they could be, yes it's not pretty, there is a lot of story in the 154mins but it is never dull, with interesting characterisation, along with excellent performances from the leads in each segment , and with some of the best dog acting you will ever see, it's not pretty at times, so dog lovers may find it a hard watch, you see the streets of Mexico where Inarritu grew up at its most purist, but that's the beauty of the film, its a bit like Pulp Fiction with all the stories interwoven but all coolness from Tarantino replaced with gritty realism of Mexico, it's like Inarritu just picked up the camera and went out his front door and made a film, it's an experience and a half and to me it's still his best film for me.

      Traffic (Steven Soderbergh)

      [​IMG]

      Easily could have been my number one and the high point for me in Soderbergh directing cannon, a brilliant multi-story telling of the drug world and the problems on both sides of the boarders, Del Toro is the stand out performance from the all star cast, and the look of the film from Soderbergh and DP Peter Andrews is just great, never a dull moment in the film which got robbed of the big golden statue for Best Picture, madness.

      Honourable Mentions

      In the mood for Love : Finally got round to seeing this the other night and really enjoyed it, like a modern version of David Leans, A Brief Encounter, going to watch it again this week.

      Sexy Beast : @lucasisking said it all, watched it the other night as I had not seen it for along time and still as fresh as when I watched it on release, brilliant British film

      Memento : Nolan best film still

      O Brother, Where art Thou? : The Coen's still great as ever

      Thirteen Days : @domtheone highlighted this one perfectly

      Erin Brockovich : Another Soderbergh cracker

      Final Destination : Cracking start to one of my favourite horror franchise, some good sequels followed

      @systemsdead read my mind here

      Film I have still not seen from that year but must

      Dancer in the Dark Highlighted here by @systemsdead post 10
       
    19. lucasisking

      lucasisking
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      ^ Really want to see those two films. Am also a big Inarritu fan (one of his will feature highly for me in one of the years to come). Don't know how I've managed to miss Traffic but its also been bumped way up the list :smashin:.
       
    20. systemsdead

      systemsdead
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      Great top choices there J.J and excellent reviews as always:smashin: pleased you enjoyed In The Mood For Love it’s one where I think the title alone puts a lot of people off.
       
    21. Roohster

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      My choice for best of 2000 has already been reviewed by Lucas, it's the excellent
      Sexy Beast

      "I won't let you be happy, why should I?"

      SB.png

      My all-time favourite movie bad guy/nutter, Don Logan.

      Scary as hell, utterly relentless and mad as a box of frogs, he's your worst nightmare come to stay as a house guest.

      Glazer is hit and miss for me as a director, (love this, didn't like Under The Skin or Birth) but I can't fault his casting choices, casting Kingsley in this role was genius. I'd love to see the audition.
      Kingsley has stated that the character is based on his grandmother :rotfl:.

      I love the whole look of this film, and the opening scene (and resulting poster image) is iconic.

      I really can't add any more that hasn't already been said at the beginning of this thread, so on to my runner up...


      Ginger Snaps

      "I'm a goddamn force of nature. I feel like I could do just about anything."
      gingersnaps.jpg

      Not Katharine Isabelle's first movie, but certainly her first big role, and the one that made everyone sit up and take notice.

      Love this film, it's smart, funny and original - traits that are sadly missing from many a horror film.

      It's a great story and beautifully scripted; so much so that the best bits all take place before the inevitable "monster fight".
      Once all the action starts I find myself really missing the dialogue.

      My second favourite werewolf film (after American Werewolf in London).
       
      Last edited: Sep 12, 2017
    22. J.J.GITTES

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      Perros is on Amazon Prime fella, if you have that, traffic is not on any steaming service at the moment , so Blu only, if that helps, can always post them two to you if you want a watch.

      Cheers Fella, got ITMFL on DVD as it was super cheap but now what the Criterion Blu as it look rather lovely and agree, most would be put of by the title , its egging me on to watch The Grandmaster from him now.

      Funny thing, when doing some prep work for the decade it showed me how much I explored cinema outside of American as I got older with a lot of forgiven language films coming up from myself, one thing I haven't done this last year or so which has bugged me.

      Just need to track down one film for 2003 as the DVD goes for stupid prices, the hunt is on.
       
    23. systemsdead

      systemsdead
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      ^
      I was super excited waiting on The Grandmaster unfortunately it did nothing for me apart from looking absolutely stunning, found it really hard to follow with its different time fragments.
       
    24. richp007

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      We're only on page 1, and I can't believe I've been beaten to it already! Although it just shows how worthy it is.

      Best Film - Memento - 9/10

      [​IMG]

      Well the best film of the 00's pretty much came at the very beginning of the decade.

      I was completely dumb struck by this film's genius when I watched it at the cinema. So much so, as far as I can remember this is one of only two films I've ever seen at the cinema twice. Because to understand it properly I had to go back and watch it again a few days later. (God Bless being able to rewind a DVD).

      For me it's still Nolan's greatest achievement. Which considering how good some of his work is, shows how great a movie it is. A truly original concept, resulting in a truly individual thriller, the likes of which I haven't seen since.

      To be honest I'm not sure how I even begin to explain it! But the genius is the way the film evolves both backwards and chronologically, coming together at the end. Rarely has colour and black and white ever been so effective in a film. Nolan using colour to show sequences in reverse order (to simulate Leonard the protagonist's mental capacity in the eyes of the viewer), and black and white sequences to move the story forward logically. The real icing on the cake is that the clues are all there, but we're as confused as Leonard is, and piecing it all together is meant to be as tricky for us as it is for him.

      I was also very pleased with the film's casting. Guy Pearce was tremendous as Leonard - what a step up from Neighbours it was! And given some of the star names touted to play Leonard before he did - Brad Pitt for one - I'm glad Pearce got the gig. Also a clever move from Nolan to use Carrie-Ann Moss and Joe Pantoliano, fresh from the success of the previous years The Matrix too. Both were excellent additions to the cast, and I remain a big fan of Pantoliano to this day.

      The only sad thing is the film's lack of success in terms of awards. Yes, that not-fit-for-purpose Academy chose to spurn it for Screenplay and Editing, but quite rightly it did win awards for these elsewhere. It was undoubtedly the best edited film of 2000; most likely the entire decade.

      It only remains to say that it is a film any movie buff should have in their collection. It's also a film that stands up to repeat viewings, and I believe you can also watch it in reverse too. But maybe @theprestige can confirm this. Because unbelievably I have never sought too.

      Runner Up - Gladiator - 9/10

      [​IMG]


      "Father to a murdered son, husband to a murdered wife. And I will have my vengeance, in this life or the next,"


      If Memento hadn't have been a 2000 film, this would definitely have been my winner.

      Strangely somewhat slightly scorned these days, but I have no idea why. Not Scott's best film, but perhaps his most box office. Again a movie that stands up to repeat viewings, and whilst dark in places, it is a lot of fun. One of my favourite scene's being where Maximus walks out to the arena with his name chanted by fellow gladiator's, and promptly slaughters the men whom clearly fear him. When it should be the other way round.

      But there are plenty of outstanding moments in this film. The battle at the beginning, as well as the recreation of Carthage in the Colosseum. The ending too is a terrific finale, and punctuates beautifully the tone of everything that preceded it.

      And then there's that score by the great man himself, Hans Zimmer. Perhaps my favourite piece of music of all time, 'Now we are Free' closes it out, and there's almost a tear in my eye as the credits roll. And I don't easily shed tears.

      There's also great turns in this from Crowe himself, as well as Joaquin Phoenix (who needed a win after the previous years woeful 8mm), and old hands Richard Harris and Oliver Reed. Oliver Reed who sadly passed during the making of the film, and is craftily re-created by computer for his final scene. If I'm honest I didn't even notice they'd done it on my 1st viewing, and for nearly 20 years past, it still remains a pretty nifty piece of editing in my opinion. There's also great work on the recreation of the Colosseum too.

      I'll certainly look with interest now if Gladiator pops up much as the Winner or Runner-Up in this thread. As I'm not sure of it's popularity around these parts. But for me it's definitely in the top 3 of 2000, and likely the top 10 of the entire 00's.

      "Are you not entertained!"

      ;)
       
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    25. domtheone

      domtheone
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      I've just subscribed to a streaming (Netflix) service for the first time ever too. Was thinking about searching for Traffic too.:facepalm:

      I'll park that idea for now and move onto 2001. Not the greatest year ever so I have my top 2 already. Think i'll re-watch something from 2002.:confused:
       
    26. J.J.GITTES

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      Surprised it not on any service , but I am sure it pop up sometime.

      As for 2001 , three classics in that year for me and not easy to pick from them, but I am going for the odd ball choice as I am sure the other two will get picked as one is a cult favourite and he other is well just brilliantly mad.
       
    27. Wildkarrde

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      Ironically i'm finding the 2000's less 'fun' than the 80's and 90's. I think that my viewing habits changed due to numerous factors and i could no longer watch and re-watch movies.
       
    28. J.J.GITTES

      J.J.GITTES
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      I think the era of the DVD is kicking in for me, more films from around the world getting released and easier to get hold of, meaning more choice and the reason I explored more out side the American bubble, great fun mind.
       
    29. theprestige

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      First of, excellent review, mate. Most people counted it as their runner up on here but you are the only one to have written about it. To be honest, I was starting to think nobody would do a write up so was please when I saw your post.

      You can indeed watch the film in 'chronological' order, but I really would advise against it. I watched about 10 mins of it once just out of curiosity and just switched it off after then because I felt like I was watching a far lesser film and betraying the purity of it.

      Naturally, I agree with everything you say about it, though I think it was a film that was just way too good for the oscars so i'm not bummed about the awards it missed out on. Guy Pearce's Leonard Shelby remains Nolan's most interesting and beguiling characters yet. Really weird that he hasn't worked with him since. Nolan seems to prefer the likes of Harry Styles these days.
       
    30. Roohster

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      I'm not much of a fan of Von Trier, but this is a superb film. Absolutely beautiful and heartbreaking... and Bjork is superb.
       
      Last edited: Sep 12, 2017

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