Presentation advice?

Dancook

Distinguished Member
I've got to give a presentation on Friday about the website I work on.

It's just a presentation to my colleagues, so it doesn't count for much. However I do want to make it interesting for them.

Personally I have found from watching other peoples (power point) presentations if they have too many words on screen, and they talk as well - it's very distracting and usually end up not looking at the screen at all so I can concentrate on what they are saying - kind of defeats the purpose of the screens!

So any presentation gurus got any words of wisdom?

thanks
 

smallclanger

Well-known Member
I've got to give a presentation on Friday about the website I work on.

It's just a presentation to my colleagues, so it doesn't count for much. However I do want to make it interesting for them.

Personally I have found from watching other peoples (power point) presentations if they have too many words on screen, and they talk as well - it's very distracting and usually end up not looking at the screen at all so I can concentrate on what they are saying - kind of defeats the purpose of the screens!

So any presentation gurus got any words of wisdom?

thanks
Lots of fancy slide transitions and sound effects.... kidding.
Keep them simple. Bullet points, a little humour where appropriate.
 

Dancook

Distinguished Member
Lots of fancy slide transitions and sound effects.... kidding.
Keep them simple. Bullet points, a little humour where appropriate.
Thanks

The website is an astronomy resource, I was thinking of finding out some pretty photos to put in the background!

But it'll probably end up looking retro!
 

mjcairney

Well-known Member
I used to have to do a Powerpoint Presentation to my colleagues in the sales team every month and there is no doubt that, as smallclanger said, you stick to just bullet points on the screen and make sure that you inject some humour to stop people falling asleep.

Cheers,

Martin.
 

Mr. Fred

Active Member
1 - Know your material behind your slides. Your slides should act as a prompt for you and contain just as much information as necessary. Too much information will cause your audience to read your slides rather than listening to you and distract them or worse, bore them.

2 - If you have something you can include in the presentation such as some kind of activity or a physical handout, do so. Attention spans vary and a brief activity can help get them back onside.

3 - Involve your audience. Use questions if appropriate or invite questions and any point from the audience. Don't be a robot just recounting information.

4 - Stick to your running time, be prepared to cut aspects that you feel don't have significant importance.

Apologies for it being a bit generic but I hope it helped.
 

Theydon Bois

Moderator
Make sure the slide template is identical across all the slides (ie font, header footer background etc)

Always work on the most crowded slide first to make sure it all fits then you know the others will be fine.
 

Singh400

Distinguished Member
Keep it simple, and don't overload the presentation with bullet points. And make sure the design of every slide is consistent.
 

KhalJimbo

Well-known Member
dont forget about diagrams, make sure your diagrams are not squashed to tiny little pictures that cannot be seen. Also if using diagrams\workflows try not to over complicate them

Less is more
 

hatchleader

Active Member
Few things i've picked up from doing presentations at Uni:

So many powerpoint presentations involve someone saying 'we've had a 30% rise in profit' and then producing a chart showing this :confused: ...... You just told us why do you need to show us!!!!

Avoid putting stuff in just to prove your point, whats on the slides should be props to your vocal presentation!

However: If your talking about the moon whack a pic of the moon up with some bullet points, but make sure the bullets are just there to highlight points... your explanation should be far more detailed and preferably from memory!

and: NEVER EVER READ OFF THE SLIDES!! Everyone went to school, they dont need you to read it!

Good luck :thumbsup:
 

Toasty

Distinguished Member
Good advice above, I also use cue cards instead of reading form the slide to help jog my memory to what I'm saying. Works great as long as you don't drop 'em ;)
 

IronGiant

Moderator
I've got to give a presentation on Friday about the website I work on.



So any presentation gurus got any words of wisdom?

thanks
Hope it snows, a lot... :D
 

FunkyMunkey

Active Member
I attended some really good presentation training when I worked in Sales. The main points were:

  • As you said yourself, keep the text as simple bullet points.
  • Transitions should only mimic how our brain and eyes see them: for text, you should only use wipe left to right, for pictures (that aren't already there when the slide loads), only use dissolve in.
  • Avoid using generic clip art. Ideally images should be as unique as possible to reinforce your point. Maybe take/use your own pics - an example the guy used was a picture he'd taken of a glass to signify clarity.
  • Other than the mouse, don't hold anything in your hands. You'll tend to fiddle with it and distract your audience.
  • Stand straight on to the audience, and avoid looking towards the screen unless it's necessary. You're addressing the audience, not the screen!
  • Make sure you address the whole room. You don't need to look at everyone, just someone in each area because everyone surrounding that person will also think you're looking at them. Look at the person for about 3 seconds, then shift your gaze to someone in another part of the audience, and so on.
  • Use the "b" button once or twice in the presentation. Pressing "b" will blank the screen, so everyone has to focus on you. Press "b" again to bring the presentation back up.
  • If it's relevant, have some kind of activity. Eg. "look at this picture of our company logo, what's the first word that comes into your head"
  • If you can, have a flip chart there and draw or write on it at some stage. Eg. if you need to show a really simple graph, or "these are the three things that our company stands for". It'll break the monotony of looking at the presentation.

That's all I can remember right now. Good luck!
 
Last edited:

bitofatit

Active Member
Thanks

The website is an astronomy resource, I was thinking of finding out some pretty photos to put in the background!

But it'll probably end up looking retro!
Tip: do the basic slides / and presentation content first before diving off to sex things up! That's the way I usually approach the presentation - how do I fit this gag in, this youtube clip wil be fantastic here -, which music should I insert that will get a laugh here etc. Spending 90% on the sexy bit first and he last 10% of your time on the content, as I do, adds to stress levels and sometimes doesn't get the right message across. Of course the punters usually like it!

BoaT
 

Steven

Senior Moderator
Less words on the screen is more. Reserve the PP for the very helpful diagrams and bits which do a better job of explaining it than you ever could. Otherwise they will be reading the screen and not listening to you. I would go as far as to say to resist the temptation to even put too many bullet points down
 

WeegyAVLover

Distinguished Member
Cheers, I'll give it a go.

Prepare to be WOW'ed by the world of ESA Science & Technology: Home page
:boring::boring::boring: ;)

I have given a few presentation and sat through more than I care to remember.

I get terrified giving presentations - despite being a very outgoing person and "office funnyman" (so I like to think!) - One thing that settles me is making people laugh, if I can make them laugh it makes me feel more at ease. I cannot script being funny I just ad-lib being funny as I am good at it (big headed I know).
Also no point having all your info on slides, bullet points only then if you do forget what you are going to say they can help put you back on track.
Keep hand movements to a minimum as this can be distracting and very few people can get away with being "handy"


However when listening to presentations.
Know your stuff.
Talk as if it excites you or interests you.
If you can make m laugh I will keep listening.
Interaction is always good.

My wife is a bit of a presentation whizz and she goes along to presentations with something like creme eggs and puts "pop quiz" questions through her presentations or does it at the begin or end to see if people have been listening and throughs them to people when they get it right - again just makes it a bit more interesting having a creme egg at a meeting is all good :)

They are my thoughts and probably b:censored:cks
 

Dony

Distinguished Member
I started a similar thread last year and got plenty of good advice.

http://www.avforums.com/forums/general-chat/1101331-help-presentation.html

It's important that you practise a lot. In the presentation I had to give for my job interview, my now boss switched off the projector half way through (it was plugged into a socket under the table where he was sat). I carried on without the slides as reference and completed the presentation. He later told me that the other candidate faffed about trying to fix the projector for about 5 mins, totally loosing the attention of the audience / interview team.
 

richard plumb

Well-known Member
Less words on the screen is more. Reserve the PP for the very helpful diagrams and bits which do a better job of explaining it than you ever could. Otherwise they will be reading the screen and not listening to you. I would go as far as to say to resist the temptation to even put too many bullet points down
+1.

PPTs where the presenter is just reading the bullet points on the screen are dull - you've basically done that within 10 seconds of the slide appearing. So either don't put everything down on the slide and talk around the slide, or use the notes page to put info down that you can refer to while the main slide is up on the projector
 
Power point is a pre-requisite for presentations.

Try something a little different, something that will hold true to what it is you do and be different to the "norm" of this type of audience interaction.

Get one or more laptops and actually show them your handy work, you already have a wonderful resource at your finger tips, make best use of it.

You could combine this with your PP if you wish to do so, i'm certain your audience will find it more engaging by the added involvement, interaction you oblige.

Sid
 

Trending threads

Latest news

BritBox adds Channel 5 and Comedy Central to roster
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
AVForums Podcast: 23rd Sept - Spears and Munsil
  • By Phil Hinton
  • Published
T+A expands E-Series with PA 1100E integrated amplifier
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Bowers & Wilkins unveils new PX wireless ANC headphones
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Roku Premiere streaming device with 4K HDR hits UK
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published

Latest threads

Top Bottom