Preparing a dual boot PC (Ubuntu + Windows 10)

dogfonos

Well-known Member
I'm preparing to set up my W10 Pro 32bit PC as a dual boot (Ubuntu + Windows 10 Pro). I've read up on it and asked numerous questions on an Ubuntu forum to try to get to grips with the subject.

For various reasons, I intend to wipe both physical HDD's and clean install W10 Pro 64bit on one HDD and Ubuntu on the second HDD. I broadly understand what I need to do though I have a specific question about UEFI vs. BIOS:

Belarc Advisor states the main circuit board is UEFI American Megatrends Inc. whereas it states that the Operating System Boot Mode is "Legacy BIOS in UEFI" (secure boot not supported). So is it UEFI or BIOS? Any explanation appreciated.
 

AJohnston

Active Member
I'm preparing to set up my W10 Pro 32bit PC as a dual boot (Ubuntu + Windows 10 Pro). I've read up on it and asked numerous questions on an Ubuntu forum to try to get to grips with the subject.

For various reasons, I intend to wipe both physical HDD's and clean install W10 Pro 64bit on one HDD and Ubuntu on the second HDD. I broadly understand what I need to do though I have a specific question about UEFI vs. BIOS:

Belarc Advisor states the main circuit board is UEFI American Megatrends Inc. whereas it states that the Operating System Boot Mode is "Legacy BIOS in UEFI" (secure boot not supported). So is it UEFI or BIOS? Any explanation appreciated.
Instead of dual booting have you thought about using Virtual Machines? I used both of those OS's as VM (VMWare ) as, part of my programming development environment. Other than VMWare no other software or configuration changes needed.
 

next010

Distinguished Member
UEFI replaced bios on motherboards and you will still see bios used at term in lots of online docs.

The UEFI may have a prompt to boot from other devices or you will have to manually enter it and select the USB drive.

1) install windows on HDD1 via its own USB installer,

To create a USB installer for Ubuntu use this tool, another is rufus if needed and boot from the USB stick.

2) install unbuntu on HDD2

When installing ubuntu don't select default (split windows HDD), instead choose entire HDD and point it at the second HDD.

After its done it will install a bootloader that will give you the selection prompt of which OS you want to boot from.


If you want a more windows like Linux desktop I would recommend Linux Mint or Zorin instead, both are based on Ubuntu but mimic windows GUI to a degree (not fully).

Virtual machine is the other path too.
 

dogfonos

Well-known Member
Thanks for your responses.

If you want a more windows like Linux desktop I would recommend Linux Mint or Zorin instead

In an ideal world, I'd wipe every trace of W10 from my PC. It's the highest-maintenance, most inconsistent OS I've ever used - and I go back a long way! (though I bypassed the 8.x OS debacle) but then I'm a 'light' user and don't make use of W10's more sophisticated features that may be invaluable to some. I also think running the 32 bit version of W10 Pro, as I currently do, is causing some of the many problems I've experienced - particularly the sluggishness/memory issues. That's why I'll clean install W10 Pro 64bit.

Anyhow, no, I don't need or want Ubuntu to look like W10, thanks. I've been running Ubuntu as a memory stick trial for some months now and it conforms to my idea of logic, unlike the schizophrenic, unreliable mess that is W10. However, for various reasons, I need to retain W10 as a secondary system, unfortunately. I'll check, but I think installable Ubuntu was put on my memory stick when I put the trial version on it.

Instead of dual booting have you thought about using Virtual Machines?

I've been researching the subject of a dual boot machine for over a year now and the virtual machine approach has been mentioned before. Thing is, I've had enough. For the sake of my mental health, I need to get a workable solution up and running now. This precludes me from further investigation (or procrastination?). Thanks for your suggestion but a dual boot PC it is.

UEFI replaced bios on motherboards and you will still see bios used at term in lots of online docs.

Indeed it did. It's just the wording of the Belarc Advisor report threw me. I guess it doesn't matter as I'll use UEFI for both OS's anyway because it appears the motherboard is UEFI 'compliant' (or whatever the correct term is).
 

oneman

Well-known Member
Same you've discounted virtual machine, as long you have sufficient hardware resources its the best way forward. You can even boot into Linux as your main OS and then use Windows in a VM if you have an app that only runs in Windows. KVM is free and pretty usable,
 

sunlituplands

Well-known Member
Re dual boot: I have such a system triple boot Windows 10, Ubuntu 20.10 and Fedora 33 on different drives using an oldish Gigabyte motherboard. Just set up the boot order you wish in the BIOS after pressing F2 and on startup press F12 in this case to bring up the drive list and choose the one you want.

Have used the same system on an American Megatrends board in the past and it is similar although I seem to remember it was a different F to get the list.

Always worked perfectly for years now.
 

dogfonos

Well-known Member
Well, part one went surprisingly well - replacing a troublesome W10 Pro 32bit system with the 64bit version. Never expected that.

Ubuntu installation not successful because, when it came to choosing my PC drives/partitions on which to install, it seemed like a foreign language. Sda, sdb and whatnot - so I couldn't be certain which HDD and partition was the partition I had previously prepared for installation. Correct me if I'm wrong but isn't Ubuntu supposed to be about the simplest Linux 'flavour' available? I've used the (non-installed) trial version of Ubuntu for a while and it really is clean and logical so why revert to alien drive and partition names at the install stage?

More reading up for me (yawn) before I try to install Ubuntu again.
 

sunlituplands

Well-known Member
Well, part one went surprisingly well - replacing a troublesome W10 Pro 32bit system with the 64bit version. Never expected that.

Ubuntu installation not successful because, when it came to choosing my PC drives/partitions on which to install, it seemed like a foreign language. Sda, sdb and whatnot - so I couldn't be certain which HDD and partition was the partition I had previously prepared for installation. Correct me if I'm wrong but isn't Ubuntu supposed to be about the simplest Linux 'flavour' available? I've used the (non-installed) trial version of Ubuntu for a while and it really is clean and logical so why revert to alien drive and partition names at the install stage?

More reading up for me (yawn) before I try to install Ubuntu again.
Generally sda1, sdb1, sdc1, sdd1 are the drives in order of connection to the board I think. Connecting a USB stick would then become sde1 in the above instance for example.

If it's a desktop and you are concerned disconnect all but the drive you are installing Ubuntu on and then reconnect the other drives when you are finished installing.

If you stick to Ubuntu Linux is very easy to install and at the end of the day a hell of a lot more simple than Windows.
 

FrankBT

Member
Ubuntu installation not successful because, when it came to choosing my PC drives/partitions on which to install, it seemed like a foreign language. Sda, sdb and whatnot - so I couldn't be certain which HDD and partition was the partition I had previously prepared for installation. Correct me if I'm wrong but isn't Ubuntu supposed to be about the simplest Linux 'flavour' available? I've used the (non-installed) trial version of Ubuntu for a while and it really is clean and logical so why revert to alien drive and partition names at the install stage?
How many drives/disks are you using? Ubuntu isn't the easiest form of Linux if you're a newbie. I would say Linux Mint is, since it resembles the Windows desktop the best.

EHPWmYc.png
 

next010

Distinguished Member
Well, part one went surprisingly well - replacing a troublesome W10 Pro 32bit system with the 64bit version. Never expected that.

Ubuntu installation not successful because, when it came to choosing my PC drives/partitions on which to install, it seemed like a foreign language. Sda, sdb and whatnot - so I couldn't be certain which HDD and partition was the partition I had previously prepared for installation. Correct me if I'm wrong but isn't Ubuntu supposed to be about the simplest Linux 'flavour' available? I've used the (non-installed) trial version of Ubuntu for a while and it really is clean and logical so why revert to alien drive and partition names at the install stage?

More reading up for me (yawn) before I try to install Ubuntu again.


The above lists the storage terminology used by linux.

The installer should have also listed the manufacturers name of the SSD/HDD, that's other way to make note of what's installed on which. Boot back into windows and go into the disk management in settings and it will show what HDD its installed on. Or check what HDD is set to boot from first that would be the windows drive.
 
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sunlituplands

Well-known Member
How many drives/disks are you using? Ubuntu isn't the easiest form of Linux if you're a newbie. I would say Linux Mint is, since it resembles the Windows desktop the best.

EHPWmYc.png
Good point, of course most Linux distros allow the installation of alternative desktop environments such as Gnome, Cinnamon, Mate, KDE and so on. Even the straight Gnome based Ubuntu default environment can be transformed quickly and simply installing 'Gnome Flashback'.
 

oneman

Well-known Member
Another vote for Mint. It's on the same kernal but as simple as it gets for people used to windows though as found filesystem is still the biggest difference to windows.
 

dogfonos

Well-known Member
How many drives/disks are you using?
Two HDDs. One containing W10, the other with Ubuntu. It is my intention that all data will be stored on the larger W10 drive.

Ubuntu isn't the easiest form of Linux if you're a newbie. I would say Linux Mint is, since it resembles the Windows desktop the best.

Honestly, I'm trying to escape the clutches of Microsoft! Any OS that even vaguely resembles Windows 10 sends me into a cold sweat. The grief that my 32bit version of W10 Pro has given me over the past two years...it's a wonder I'm not in counseling. And to think that W10 is the OS that Microsoft will be remembered for. Oh dear!

Unfortunately though, I need to retain W10 (now the 64bit Pro version) but it will rarely see the light of day.

I've used Ubuntu (as a USB drive 'live' trial) for months and like what I see. It's clean, logical, intuitive, fast and reliable - in fact, everything that W10 Pro 32bit wasn't. I have no qualms at all with using Ubuntu - it's just getting it installed was the issue. I checked out 5 or 6 online guides (incl. one on the official Ubuntu forum) and none were sufficiently clear for me to risk damaging a recent W10 clean install. Earlier today, I paid a rare visit to YouTube and within minutes, Ubuntu was up and running. Success - at long last.

Thanks for all your replies. I much appreciated the info. and suggestions. Now it's just a matter of acclimatization.
 

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