Powerline Query

DanH23

Novice Member
I am wanting to install a powerline at home to help with video streaming in the living room due to my router being situated elsewhere.

I will only need an Ethernet connection, so am looking at the below option from Curry's.


At some point in the future I want to run the internet to the garage so will need an extra powerline in there which ideally would be WiFi. So my questions are 1) would adding a single WiFi enabled power line work with the product above and 2) is it even possible to buy a single powerline to add on later as everything I see online is a starter pack which is sold in pairs.

Thanks in advance
 
single unit but not got wifi bult in

Amazon product

single with wifi but seems expensive for the extra wifi.

Amazon product

worth noting that every extra powerline added divides the highest possible speed between them as they all want to talk to the "master" plug and share the bandwidth to do so.

so say you get 600mb out of your possible 1200mb due to general overheads from using powerlines when you have just a a pair, if you added a 3rd you will get 400mb between the 3 of them roughly add a 4th 300mb maybe between all 4 - its how they function. These are very rough numbers for example.
 
Last edited:

DanH23

Novice Member
Thanks.

If adding a third later in the future is it the case that this needs to be at least the same speed as the others two otherwise all powerlines on the network will downgrade to the lower speed?
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
worth noting that every extra powerline added divides the highest possible speed between them as they all want to talk to the "master" plug and share the bandwidth to do so.

so say you get 600mb out of your possible 1200mb due to general overheads from using powerlines when you have just a a pair, if you added a 3rd you will get 400mb between the 3 of them roughly add a 4th 300mb maybe between all 4 - its how they function. These are very rough numbers for example.

It's not quite like that though.

For a start, the advertised speed is the duplex speed so the maximum possible speed would be half of it. Then you have overheads which will often knock it down to around 1/10 of the advertised speed in normal real-world houses. You might get a bit more but if you use this figure you won't be disappointed.

Greg does a review here and does get a little better but its not brilliant.


Also, these have MIMO so might be better with more than one adapter. It used to be similar to WiFi in that only one thing can talk at once so adding more devices drove up contention.

Streaming to a single device should be ok but don't plan on it being a long term solution especially if you go for broadband speeds past 200Mbps or use them for in your internal network for connecting a NAS to something else as these will rapidly become bottlenecks.
 

Sloppy Bob

Distinguished Member
Powerlines can be great, or completely useless.

I have 4 in the house, I can stream 4K rips and max my internet over three of them.
The 4th one, a bedroom, I can't even stream 1080p rips off my server and streaming services cut down to a lower quality.

I took the same adapters to a friends house for him to try them. Might as well have been cups with string attached for all the good they were.

It's all down to your house wiring and the layout. Make sure to buy from a retailer with a good returns policy
 

neilball

Well-known Member
It’s often not so much the wiring - copper T&E is not going to be any different, but more likely the high frequency noise and interference carried on the wiring that creates many of the issues. There can be many sources if this interference, and if it raises the noise floor too high then the powerline signals simply are not clear enough for communication between nodes to be fast or reliable. And as you cannot see or easily test this then it’s simply a lottery as to how well powerline works in any household. It can also explain why some people get intermittent issues or have a once reliable setup start to misbehave.
 

Sloppy Bob

Distinguished Member
It can also explain why some people get intermittent issues or have a once reliable setup start to misbehave.

The one in my lounge is rock solid, until it throws a wobbly once every few weeks and I need to unplug it and the one at the router, and plug them back in.
Occasionally this doesn't work and then I have to swap them around. I have no idea why this works, but it does.
 

The latest video from AVForums

Panasonic LZ2000, LZ1500 & LZ980 Hands-on Launch Event | No QD-OLED for 2022, new 77-inch for LZ2000
Subscribe to our YouTube channel
Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom