Power Director 8 HD probs

gazkilla

Standard Member
Hi :hiya:

I'm having probs with PD8 and the editing. When i drag the AVCHD file from the library onto the timeline its not at the same quality as the original source. It used to be on my Vista PC but now I've upgraded to Windows 7,I can't quite remember the exact preferences to use. It seems really blocky and to an extent VHS standard :eek: Is it because I'm playing it on a PC where I've put the settings so that it'll be watched on a HD TV?

Thanks for any replies,Gary
 

CrashEd

Standard Member
Hi Gary,

I'm new to PD (ver 10), however one thing I noticed with AVCHD footage in v10 is that the media player plays back video clips at a lower resolution than the original file. This is to save PC resources. I think you can change this however using one of the buttons in the media viewer toolbar below the playback area.

Have you tried rendering your footage to a file and checking it outside of PD? Or even burning it to a disc and trying it in your target device (DVD player etc)? I now have re-writeable DVDs/bluray discs that I use before I do a final burn to disc.
 

grahamlthompson

Distinguished Member
All editors do this, how would you fit 1920 x 1080 pixels on a small section of the screen ?. If you have a high spec PC you will be lucky if the full screen is capable of 1920 x 1080.
 

CrashEd

Standard Member
Indeed, depends how the op has it setup. You can preview at any resolution up to full screen (if your monitor's resolution is big enough, as you say).

It's worth checking the preview settings too. From the manual:

Select (.) and then a preview resolution from the list (Full HD*, HD*, high, normal, low) to set the quality of the video used when previewing your movie in the preview window. The higher the resolution you select, the more resources that are required to preview your video project.

Preview Mode:

CyberLink PowerDirector provides two modes you can use to preview your video production:

Real-time Preview: synchronizes and renders clips and effects in real-time, displaying a preview of your video at the standard 25 (PAL)/30 (NTSC) frames per second.

Non Real-time Preview: mutes the audio and displays a preview at a reduced speed to help make editing much more fluid. Useful when editing high-definition video, using multiple PiP tracks on a less powerful computer, or when you receive dropped frames when previewing. By muting the audio and slowing down the video, CyberLink PowerDirector lets you view more frames per second when your computer has trouble providing a smooth preview during editing.
 
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grahamlthompson

Distinguished Member
Indeed, depends how the op has it setup. You can preview at any resolution up to full screen (if your monitor's resolution is big enough, as you say).

It's worth checking the preview settings too. From the manual:

Select (.) and then a preview resolution from the list (Full HD*, HD*, high, normal, low) to set the quality of the video used when previewing your movie in the preview window. The higher the resolution you select, the more resources that are required to preview your video project.

Preview Mode:

CyberLink PowerDirector provides two modes you can use to preview your video production:

Real-time Preview: synchronizes and renders clips and effects in real-time, displaying a preview of your video at the standard 25 (PAL)/30 (NTSC) frames per second.

Non Real-time Preview: mutes the audio and displays a preview at a reduced speed to help make editing much more fluid. Useful when editing high-definition video, using multiple PiP tracks on a less powerful computer, or when you receive dropped frames when previewing. By muting the audio and slowing down the video, CyberLink PowerDirector lets you view more frames per second when your computer has trouble providing a smooth preview during editing.
You can't display a higher resolution in a window on your monitor than there are actual pixels in the window. It's a physical impossibility.

Take a 1600 x 900 display. A window quarter of the display area will have 800 x 450 pixels in it. This applies whatever settings you choose for the preview. A lower quality preview will simply have more of the pixels invented, a higher setting than 800 x 450 will have pixels removed to fit.
 

CrashEd

Standard Member
You can't display a higher resolution in a window on your monitor than there are actual pixels in the window. It's a physical impossibility.
No that's obvious, and I never said you could. However we are singing from similar hymn sheets!

All editors do this, how would you fit 1920 x 1080 pixels on a small section of the screen ?. If you have a high spec PC you will be lucky if the full screen is capable of 1920 x 1080.
PD has options for 'preview' resolution which are basically 'HD', 'High', 'Normal' and 'Low'. Agreed, the 'HD' resolution is nothing like Full HD otherwise it would fit the whole screen, as you say. They are all scaled to the size of the preview screen. It's just a way of downscaling the video to improve performance further. I have no problems though at the full preview res in Win7 on a 2-3 yr old machine, however the OP should check these settings as the 'normal' and 'low' settings would make the video look very poor quality (blocky) due to the low resolution. It's easy to see this effect by playing back your timeline and flipping between the settings.
 
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grahamlthompson

Distinguished Member
No that's obvious, and I never said you could. However we are singing from similar hymn sheets!



.
It might be obvious to you and I, :D

Believe me it's not obvious to many. The way HD monitor's and TV's work is a mystery to many.

How many realise that watching SD TV on a Full-HD TV they are watching 1920 x 1080 pixels (sadly most are guessed :eek:)
 

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