Possible change of screen

DodgeTheViper

Moderator
I've currently got a Grandview Cyber Series Electric 106" screen. The 106" is the diagonal measurement and the screen is approx 8' wide.

I'm assessing if a wider screen is possible within the space that I have available. Available space is approx 106" or 2.7m wide. The casing can be wider as that won't interfere with speaker positioning.
The room is light controllable and not used for movie watching in the day. There is a window and doors that are protected by curtains and light does seep through the gaps during the day but I don't watch during this time. In the darker hours it's black, dark grey walls with a black painted ceiling.

My current PJ is a Panasonic AE-3000 which is still going strong with plenty of hours left on the bulb. But I want to take into account a new PJ when I get the screen.
Lens distance from screen is approx 3.9m.

I'd like tab tensioned, IR control, 16:9, and variable drop adjustment. I don't need/want a AT screen.

Any recommendations please ?

Cheers :D
 
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Deleted member 598831

Guest
Screenline Othelloline - Tab Tensioned Range 9ft | Quantum AV
 
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jfinnie

Distinguished Member
If you go tab tensioned (I guess the current screen isn't) you will lose a bit of screen width from the tensioning system if it has to drop down into a fixed width gap.

Eg; in the case of a Euroscreen Diplomat TT screen; the visible screen size is 264mm less than the bottom bar width (drawing here: http://www.euroscreens.se/backnet/media_archive/original/e5b58d0a9a508ea4f94d25ee7dd6df65.pdf )

2.7m width available - 0.264m bottom bar allowance = 2.436 visible screen width.

That is 95.9" wide, which gives ~110" visible diagonal.

I guess bottom line is that to see how much you'd gain (not much in the case of Euroscreen Diplomat TT) you'll have to very carefully study the drawings for the tab tensioning losses.
 
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Deleted member 598831

Guest
Just for reference here is a pic of Kev's room, (hope ya don't mind @DodgeTheViper )

IMG_0691.JPG
 

Rickyj at Kalibrate

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
As @jfinnie has mentioned, you will lose quite a lot of viewable width, if that 2.7m is a 'hard limit' if you go for a tab tensioned screen.

When I refer to a 'hard limit', this means the bottom bar can not exceed this limit. There are certain situations (yours may be one?) where the limit is actually bigger as the bar could fall behind the front speakers? In this situation the limit for the screen, may be the width of the viewable area or the case?

So my questions would be:

- can the bottom bar fall behind the speakers?
- what projector(s) would you be considering for the next change - for throw distance purposes?
- Do you want to go for a 2.35:1 screen, if not, what is the distance from top of centre speaker to the ceiling, as looks like you are nearly max'd out on that dimension.

We have a factory in Europe that produce size screens for us. This means we can customise the measurements to 1cm of the required size. These are the same price as the standard sizes, you just pay for the standard size up from your dimensions i.e. if you want a screen with overall of 2.7m, you would pay for the 3m, and then the customised specs would be provided to the factory.

I have attached pdfs for the TT and Electric screens to give you an idea of the pricing.

Let me know if you need any more information:)
 

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  • Tab tensioned (revised Jan 2017).pdf
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  • electric.pdf
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jfinnie

Distinguished Member
I hadn't seen the pic and indeed it does look like the bar might be able to drop behind those speakers, though I guess it may look a bit odd.

@Rickyj @ Kalibrate , what is the deal with the two types of tensioning shown in the PDF? - I've only ever seen the flat bar, not the one with the kinked ends. What is the difference / any benefit to either system?
 

Rickyj at Kalibrate

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
I hadn't seen the pic and indeed it does look like the bar might be able to drop behind those speakers, though I guess it may look a bit odd.

@Rickyj @ Kalibrate , what is the deal with the two types of tensioning shown in the PDF? - I've only ever seen the flat bar, not the one with the kinked ends. What is the difference / any benefit to either system?
With the 'usual' system, their may need to be bit of consumer interaction over time to re-tension the strings etc. The 'counterweight' version is designed so that it adjusts naturally over time.
 

DodgeTheViper

Moderator
Hi Ricky,

Thanks for replying ;)

The bottom bar can fall behind the speaker cabinet and I doubt that it would look odd. The back of the speaker cabinets is just about in front of the screen currently.

My next projector would be along the lines of Epson 9300 or Optoma UHD 60/65.

I'm initially thinking of a 16:9 screen. The distance from ceiling to top of centre speaker is approx 166cm.

Cheers
 

Rickyj at Kalibrate

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
Hi Ricky,

Thanks for replying ;)

The bottom bar can fall behind the speaker cabinet and I doubt that it would look odd. The back of the speaker cabinets is just about in front of the screen currently.

My next projector would be along the lines of Epson 9300 or Optoma UHD 60/65.

I'm initially thinking of a 16:9 screen. The distance from ceiling to top of centre speaker is approx 166cm.

Cheers

Not a problem.

I have double checked and both the Optoma & Epson projectors would have throw distance to throw and image 2.80m, and 2.87m wide respectively (See the attached pdf and image), so throw distance is not an issue.

Presuming an estimated distance of 15cm from ceiling to the bottom of the case (not sure if you included the pelmet into the 166cm), that will give us a maximum viewable height of 150cm. This equates to around 2.67m wide max for a 16x9 screen. Therefore, presuming the room is able to take the case, you could go for a 2.65cm wide screen (allowing a couple of cm contingency), giving you an overall diagonal of over 119" diagonal. If you were to go for our tab tensioned screen, the case would be around the 350cm screen, but with a final case width of around 314cm.

Whether you would want to go that big would be your decision, for a couple of reasons:

- The screen will end up being quite high towards the ceiling, unless you are reclining that could become tiring if you watch a lot of 16x9 material?

- The viewing part of the screen is going to be very close to the speakers. The reflections for the speakers will likely have an impact on the sides of the image closest to them.
 

Attachments

  • 170715 Dodge Optoma.JPG
    170715 Dodge Optoma.JPG
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  • 170715 Dodge Epson Calc.pdf
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DodgeTheViper

Moderator
Thanks Ricky, that's much appreciated ;)

It's getting to within the boundaries of my knowledge now though.

I'm purely thinking of a 16:9 screen as I can view 2:35 on it, albeit with borders. But unsure how 16:9 would be viewed on a 2:35 screen. Admittedly, 16:9 content is limited but it is there and a 16:9 screen doesn't need any adjustment to view 2:35. It's just the borders that are irritating. My Panasonic AE-3000 does have lens memory though, so I can lower the 2:35 image to the bottom of the screen so the border is only at the top.

I'm unsure if I should be looking for a 2:35 screen.
 

Rickyj at Kalibrate

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
Thanks Ricky, that's much appreciated ;)

It's getting to within the boundaries of my knowledge now though.

I'm purely thinking of a 16:9 screen as I can view 2:35 on it, albeit with borders. But unsure how 16:9 would be viewed on a 2:35 screen. Admittedly, 16:9 content is limited but it is there and a 16:9 screen doesn't need any adjustment to view 2:35. It's just the borders that are irritating. My Panasonic AE-3000 does have lens memory though, so I can lower the 2:35 image to the bottom of the screen so the border is only at the top.

I'm unsure if I should be looking for a 2:35 screen.
I will keep this brief (just getting ready for my sons 4th birthday party....), but having looked at your situation, with your width limited by your throw distance, going constant image width as you are doing now is probably the best idea.

Moving the image to bottom can work well, and would continue to work with the Epson (but not the Optoma easily, due to manual controls).

Alternatively you could look at a multiformat screen, but that can add to the cost, to around double. More info here: We are selling our demo Multi-format screen | Kalibrate Limited | Home Cinema products, Calibration, DVD Players, 3D Glasses | Audio Systems | Cinema Systems
 

DodgeTheViper

Moderator
Thanks again.

I haven't read enough about the Optoma to notice that it doesn't have a motorised lens control. So that is probably off the radar now.

And looks like I'd be best sticking to a 16:9 screen.

;)
 

Doug Pyper

Distinguished Member
- The viewing part of the screen is going to be very close to the speakers. The reflections for the speakers will likely have an impact on the sides of the image closest to them.

Just on this point, if it's of use, I currently have this cut to size on the tops of my subs (which sit just below my screen). I used to have it on the sides of my MK S150s when they were either side of my screen. It's similar to black velvet/devore, so soaks up reflections well, and is very easy to stick on/peel off without damaging the speakers' surface or leaving any residue. It makes a big difference if you're bothered/distracted by reflections.
 

DodgeTheViper

Moderator
Just on this point, if it's of use, I currently have this cut to size on the tops of my subs (which sit just below my screen). I used to have it on the sides of my MK S150s when they were either side of my screen. It's similar to black velvet/devore, so soaks up reflections well, and is very easy to stick on/peel off without damaging the speakers' surface or leaving any residue. It makes a big difference if you're bothered/distracted by reflections.

I've got the biggest reflections covered, which is the inside edge of the cabinets. That would look neater but I'd be crapping it at the thought of it leaving any kind of residue . . . . . Or worse.
 

Doug Pyper

Distinguished Member
I've got the biggest reflections covered, which is the inside edge of the cabinets. That would look neater but I'd be crapping it at the thought of it leaving any kind of residue . . . . . Or worse.

Yea, that was my concern before putting it on the 150s. But I figured it's worth a punt at £5. So I tried it on a surface before putting it on the 150s. It was totally fine, and hardly sticky at all. In fact, I've been mulling putting some on the top of my S5s, just to protect them (my M6s are behind an AT screen, so reflections/protection isn't an issue for them).

You can see what it looks like in this pic. It had gathered a bit of dust - I'd been messing about with Rockwool prior to taking the pic - but on the sides of speakers it hardly attracts dust, and more or less disappears into shadows so as to be largely invisible from a few feet.

It made a big difference, and well worth it. I find reflections really annoying/distracting. I'd recommend checking it out, and if you're concerned once you've got it about putting it on the Arendals you're only a fiver down.
 

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DodgeTheViper

Moderator
I might get some and try it on some other surfaces. I'm not bothered about losing a fiver but more about my beloved Arendals :D
 

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