Position of Sub

newcomers

Active Member
hey guys,

had my setup for about 2 years now. I have an onkyo 606 with a jamo 5.1 speaker setup, along with Sky HD, PS3 and an HTPC all connected via HDMI.

I have the 50" plasma wall mounted on the chimney breast, and I have a 3 seater sofa opposite, with the 2 rear speakers to the left and right of the sofa. Also to the left of the sofa is the sub.

What Ive found is that if sitting on the sofa, you obviously feel the effects of the sub. If sitting on any chairs in the living room (one being also close the sub) you cant really feel the affect of the sub. Ive tried turning the sub round in different positions but doesnt make any difference.

Should the sub be next to the tv (i.e front) or would a better sub be the best option of allowing all seats to feel the affect, or is it just not possible?

The problem I have is that the cable for the sub is under a wooden floor and it would be hard to re-route the wires, but if you guys feel it'd make a difference, id do it.

Thanks
 

Showoff

Distinguished Member
I don't speak from experience as I've not played about moving my sub, but I'd suggest you buy a long sub cable (just a budget one) that you can run over the flooring just to try out a few positions. The reason for this is the effects will depend on so many variables from the flooring you have, what else you have in the room, even to how you personally like it to sound/feel. Only you can work this out in your room. ;)
 

Member 639844

Former Advertiser
The best position of a sub changes with every single room. The only way to find the best positions is to try moving the sub about till you find which is best. Because of the way sub bass interacts with any given room, you end up with some of its frequencies louder than others, and which are louder and quieter changes around the room. Even moving just a foot to your right can give a totally different response., and this is what you are noticing.

You basically have 3 options to try improve what your hearing.

1. Move the sub around to other positions and listen for improvements.

2. Buy an SPL meter, download REW (free sub analysing software), then run a few tests to see where your problems are and if they can be improved. Again you still really have to move the sub about to find where it works best.

3. Invest in an auto sub EQ solution. These can be quite expensive, the current cheapest is around the £250 mark. These are fantastic bits of kit though according to those who have them. You plug them in and they test your sub with in built sweep tones, then they apply a load of electronic magic to make your sub work at its absolute best from what ever position you have to use the sub in.

It's upto you if you want to invest the time in learning about the intricacies of sub bass and how it works in your room, but theres plenty to learn if it floats your boat. If you dont mind spending the money, the auto EQ devices are the simplest and easiest option by far, not to mention they leave you with the very best results.
 

newcomers

Active Member
The best position of a sub changes with every single room. The only way to find the best positions is to try moving the sub about till you find which is best. Because of the way sub bass interacts with any given room, you end up with some of its frequencies louder than others, and which are louder and quieter changes around the room. Even moving just a foot to your right can give a totally different response., and this is what you are noticing.

You basically have 3 options to try improve what your hearing.

1. Move the sub around to other positions and listen for improvements.

2. Buy an SPL meter, download REW (free sub analysing software), then run a few tests to see where your problems are and if they can be improved. Again you still really have to move the sub about to find where it works best.

3. Invest in an auto sub EQ solution. These can be quite expensive, the current cheapest is around the £250 mark. These are fantastic bits of kit though according to those who have them. You plug them in and they test your sub with in built sweep tones, then they apply a load of electronic magic to make your sub work at its absolute best from what ever position you have to use the sub in.

It's upto you if you want to invest the time in learning about the intricacies of sub bass and how it works in your room, but theres plenty to learn if it floats your boat. If you dont mind spending the money, the auto EQ devices are the simplest and easiest option by far, not to mention they leave you with the very best results.

Think Ill get a long cable and move the sub about.

My living room consists of 3 sofas (3 seater, 2 seater, 1 seater). Heavy coffee table, nest of tables, a side table next to the sub (previously sat over and covered the sub), foot stall. side board and a vetrine which are both at the other end of the lounge.

Something else ive found is that the bass sounds louder in the dining room, compared to being in certain parts of the living room. The dining room is at the other end of the living room, and has an opening into it from the living room (no door) and also a large pane of glass. You are definitely more aware of the bass in the dining room than wheh sitting in the 1 seater sofa. 1 seater sofa is about 4 meters from sub, dining room is about 7-8 meters from sub.
 

Member 639844

Former Advertiser
Those kinds of rooms are known for causing bass suck out. The opening into the other room causes the bass in your room to be dampened down. You may find your sub works bet in one corner on the wall the opening is on.

Try that first, and try swapping the phase on the sub to to see which works best for you main sitting position.
 

newcomers

Active Member
Those kinds of rooms are known for causing bass suck out. The opening into the other room causes the bass in your room to be dampened down. You may find your sub works bet in one corner on the wall the opening is on.

Try that first, and try swapping the phase on the sub to to see which works best for you main sitting position.

What do you mean by swapping the phase? Also, on the back of the sub I have 3 controls, gain, phase and cut off. I have the gain at minimum which I was advised to do (amp also has sub to -5), but what should the other 2 be set to, and what do they actually do?

Thanks
 

Member 639844

Former Advertiser
Its typical for a subs gain to be around 50% or 11 o'clock is on the dial. The Frequency crossover is handled by the amp when you use a low level connection to set this dial on the sub all the way up as high as it can go and leave it there. The phase is the switch on the back. Its basically a setting to try and make sure its working in time with your speakers properly. Thats a very basic explanation of what it does and without measuring equipment you cant get it bang on, you should however just try both settings to see if you can detect a difference. If not great, if you can keep the one you prefer.
 

newcomers

Active Member
OK, to move the sub im going to have to extend the cable to the sub. Its going to be easier to extend it round the back of the sofa rather than start drilling through the chimney breast (wife wont be pleased!!).

Does anybody make extensions for sub cables, or would I have to make one up mysefl?

If I have to make it, what type of cable and connectors will I need?

Thanks
 

Member 639844

Former Advertiser
Easiest thing is to get a phono to phono connector, and by the cheapest 10 m phono cable you can find just to experiment with. Then just connect to your existing cables from where they are now. This way if you end up leaving the sub where it is now the only thing youve lost is no more than a couple quid and an hour or 2 experimenting.
 

newcomers

Active Member
Thanks for that mate, ill post back the results.
 

newcomers

Active Member
Im going to sound like a right idiot now, but Ive found a lead but just want to make sure its suitable. Its listed as:

Single Digital Audio Cable (75 Ohms)

and the connector is listed as:

Single Phono to Phono Gender Changer (F-F)

Are they both ok to go ahead and buy?

Thanks
 
Last edited:

Member 639844

Former Advertiser
Yep. they're the ones. F stands for female. Male connectors enter the female ones and a twin 'f' adapter is for connecting 2 male end cables together. All cables are male end as the female socket is usually part of a component, like your sub or amp.

There should be a picture though so you can see, if not they are the correct ones..
 

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